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Political Paranoia: The Psychopolitics of…
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Political Paranoia: The Psychopolitics of Hatred (edition 1997)

by Robert S. Robins (Author)

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Member:jareader
Title:Political Paranoia: The Psychopolitics of Hatred
Authors:Robert S. Robins (Author)
Info:Yale University Press (1997), Edition: 1st, 408 pages
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Political Paranoia: The Psychopolitics of Hatred by Robert S. Robins

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Paranoia is an underlying theme in political life. While healthy suspicion is invaluable to leaders, extreme cases are disastrous for citizens and nations alike. Arguing that humans have a natural tendency toward paranoia based on the fear of strangers and the need for friends, Robins and Post (When Illness Strikes the Leader: The Dilemma of the Captive King, LJ 2/15/93) examine the role of paranoia in the political context. They first discuss the basic elements of the paranoid condition, then explore past paranoid episodes (Salem witch hunts,) paranoid societies (the Dobu society of New Guinea), and conspiracy thinking. Along the way, they examine the paranoid regimes of Pol Pot, Idi Amin, Joseph Stalin, and Adolf Hitler as well as those of Jim Jones, David Koresh, and Middle East terrorists. The result is a fine complement to Anton Neumayr's Dictators in the Mirror of Medicine: Napoleon, Hitler, Stalin (Medi-Ed Pr., 1995).

Paranoia is not an obscure mental state afflicting some individuals but a widespread condition of modern societies, say the authors of this engrossing book. Robins and Post describe the paranoid personality, explain why paranoia is part of human evolutionary history, and examine the conditions that must exist before the message of the paranoid takes root in a vulnerable population, leading to mass movements and genocidal violence.
  antimuzak | Nov 20, 2005 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0300070276, Hardcover)

Paranoia is not an obscure mental state afflicting some individuals but a widespread condition of modern societies, say the authors of this book. Robert S. Robins and Jerrold M. Post, M.D., document and interpret the malign power of paranoia in a variety of contexts - in political movements like McCarthyism, in organizations like the John Birch Society, in leaders like Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, Jim Jones, and David Koresh, and among extreme groups that commit violence in the name of Christianity, islam, and Judaism. Indeed, Robins and Post show that paranoid dynamic has been aggressively present in every social disaster of this century. Robins and Post describe the paranoid personality, explain why paranoia is part of human evolutionary history, and examine the conditions that must exist before the message of the paranoid takes root in a vulnerable population, leading to mass movements and genocidal violence. Their wide-ranging discussion sheds lights on many troubling episodes in our history: why more than 900 people committed suicide in Guyana in 1978 with their leader, Jim Jones; how the terrorists who bombed New York's World Trade Centre in New York in 1993 justified their violence in the name of God; how the need for enemies in the wake of the dissolution of the Soviet empire led to a rise in anti-Semitism in some eastern European countries even though the Jewish population had been nearly decimated; how paranoia manifests itself among black and white racists; and why the conspiracy theory elaborated in Oliver stone's film JFK strikes such a chord in the viewing public.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:14 -0400)

Robert S. Robins and Jerrold M. Post, M.D., experts in political psychology, document and interpret the malign power of paranoia in a variety of contexts - in political movements like McCarthyism; in organizations like the John Birch Society; in leaders like Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, Jim Jones, and David Koresh; and among extreme groups that commit violence in the name of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Indeed, Robins and Post show that the paranoid dynamic has been aggressively present in every social disaster of this century. Robins and Post describe the paranoid personality, explain why paranoia is part of human evolutionary history, and examine the conditions that must exist before the message of the paranoid takes root in a vulnerable population, leading to mass movements and genocidal violence.… (more)

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