HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

How to be sick : a Buddhist-inspired guide…
Loading...

How to be sick : a Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and… (original 2010; edition 2010)

by Toni Bernhard

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1518112,851 (4.29)9
Member:m.belljackson
Title:How to be sick : a Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers
Authors:Toni Bernhard
Info:Boston : Wisdom Publications, c2010.
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:Illness, Buddha, Love, Family, Doctors, Chronic Fatigue

Work details

How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers by Toni Bernhard (2010)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Very helpful. I have studied Buddhism for years and this is a great resource for chronically ill people. ( )
  gabarito | May 13, 2018 |
Fantastic book. From loneliness to solitude. From suffering to equanimity. Great ideas for all of us not just those with chronic illness. ( )
  TheBibliophage | Mar 20, 2018 |
Written for people with chronic illnesses from which, at this time, there are no cures,
the author shares many of her own experiences after learning that getting better and
being her old self was no longer possible.

She does not spare details of the darkest and saddest hours, months, and years as she
slowly finds hope for acceptance and dealing with her life in a more actively positive way
with inspirations from Buddhist precepts.

For readers not familiar with Buddhist terms, it helps to make a bookmark with brief definitions.
This would be welcome in future editions.

Many of her ideas will be valuable resources for both sick people and their caretakers,
yet, like the Dalai Lama and Swami Pranayomama, she does not embrace basic
Buddhist compassion for all animals and so references animal experimentation results. ( )
  m.belljackson | Aug 30, 2017 |
A great Buddhist book for anyone, learning and accepting Life As It Is.
  LiveOakUU | May 10, 2016 |
Some helpful stuff in here to pass on to Z.
  beckydj | Jan 4, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0861716264, Paperback)

This life-affirming, instructive and thoroughly inspiring book is a must-read for anyone who is—or who might one day be—sick. And it can also be the perfect gift of guidance, encouragement, and uplifting inspiration to family, friends, and loved ones struggling with the many terrifying or disheartening life changes that come so close on the heels of a diagnosis of a chronic condition or even life-threatening illness.

The author—who became ill while a university law professor in the prime of her career—tells the reader how she got sick and, to her and her partner’s bewilderment, stayed that way. Toni had been a longtime meditator, going on long meditation retreats and spending many hours rigorously practicing, but soon discovered that she simply could no longer engage in those difficult and taxing forms. She had to learn ways to make “being sick” the heart of her spiritual practice—and through truly learning how to be sick, she learned how, even with many physical and energetic limitations, to live a life of equanimity, compassion, and joy. And whether we ourselves are sick now or not, we can learn these vital arts of living well from How to Be Sick.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:21 -0400)

This life-affirming, instructive and thoroughly inspiring book is a must-read for anyone who is—or who might one day be—sick. And it can also be the perfect gift of guidance, encouragement, and uplifting inspiration to family, friends, and loved ones struggling with the many terrifying or disheartening life changes that come so close on the heels of a diagnosis of a chronic condition or even life-threatening illness.The author—who became ill while a university law professor in the prime of her career—tells the reader how she got sick and, to her and her partner’s bewilderment, stayed that way. Toni had been a longtime meditator, going on long meditation retreats and spending many hours rigorously practicing, but soon discovered that she simply could no longer engage in those difficult and taxing forms. She had to learn ways to make “being sick” the heart of her spiritual practice—and through truly learning how to be sick, she learned...… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.29)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 6
3.5 1
4 10
4.5 3
5 15

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 129,000,521 books! | Top bar: Always visible