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Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett
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Reaper Man (original 1991; edition 2002)

by Terry Pratchett

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7,85882425 (4.12)181
Member:Novak
Title:Reaper Man
Authors:Terry Pratchett
Info:HarperTorch (2002), Mass Market Paperback, 384 pages
Collections:Terry Pratchett
Rating:***
Tags:Discworld

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Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett (1991)

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» See also 181 mentions

English (79)  Spanish (2)  Polish (1)  French (1)  All languages (83)
Showing 1-5 of 79 (next | show all)
Mi hermano me dice que, como fue mi cumpleaños, tiene pensado regalarme libros.
-¡Si!- digo yo, saltando en una pata.
-Haceme una lista de que autores te gustan.
Le hago una lista de casi 20 autores, le marco las prioridades, le anoto los títulos que ya tengo de cada uno y, además, le hago una lista extra de autores , en caso de que, por alguna razón, no hubiera ninguno de los que le marqué en un principio, esos otros funcionarían como opciones "aceptables".

(Era una lista de tres hojas)

Hoy, dos días después, vuelve de su viaje a la capital. Me dice:
-Perdí la lista, así que te traje estos.
[b:The Silver Dream|16248073|The Silver Dream (InterWorld, #2)|Neil Gaiman|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1365992985s/16248073.jpg|21856072] y este de Terry Pratchett, dos autores que, da la casualidad, no aparecían en ninguna de las dos listas que tan meticulosamente había escrito y OH CASUALIDAD BIZARRA ENTRE LAS CASUALIDADES son dos de sus autores predilectos!!

Conclusión, creo que mi hermano me acaba de hacer la gran Homero Simpson y de regalarme una bola de boliche , jajajajajaj
  LaMala | Jun 7, 2015 |
DEATH is not only the main character of "Reaper Man", he becomes a humorous metaphorical concept in the hands of Terry Pratchett when imagining if the Grim Reaper got replaced and the consequence to the Disc. Pratchett is at his comical and narrative best, further developing previously established characters and introducing memorable new ones.

The Auditors, which I first learned about watching The Hogfather miniseries, make their first appearance in the Discworld novels and target DEATH because he's gained a personality. The result DEATH is forced into retirement, it's short but he decides to learn to live in what time he's got. While living on the farm of Miss Flitworth, DEATH learns about every day things and personal interactions as "Bill Door" all the while checking his golden watch tick down. While DEATH is on the farm, the Auditors didn't have someone to immediately fill his position resulting in people dying but not "moving on" as in the case of Windle Poons, a 130 year old Wizard who had a more active undead "life" than his actual life. Poons, the Wizards of the Unseen University, and many other assorted characters must contend with the build up of Life Force that could result in something that can be the death of a city.

The two plots are vaguely intertwined and only combine with one another at the very end, however each has little subplots that Pratchett uses not only to humorous but narrative effect that drives the book forward. Honestly, I could not find a fault in this book and probably because since I've started reading Discworld I've been looking forward to reading the DEATH series of books with anticipation. However, the time I spent reading this book has been with a smile on my face as noted by my co-workers who shared a table with me during lunches and breaks. I can't give a better recommendation than that. ( )
  mattries37315 | Apr 24, 2015 |
I have a love/hate r'ship with the Discworld books.
I enjoy every encounter I have with Rincewind, the Luggage, and the Librarian.
Carrot is mildly interesting
Bits of concepts throughout the series are clever.
Pretty much the rest of the characters, and books, annoy and/or frustrate me. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Apr 14, 2015 |
Reaper Man is an excellent novel about mortality and the value of life. While it is the eleventh Discworld novel, it can be read independently of the others and is a fairly good book to start the series with.

“No one is actually dead until the ripples they cause in the world die away…”

Reaper Man, in short, is a book where Death gets fired. Not death, the end of living, but Death, the grim reaper who who carries away the souls.

From this initial beginning the book splits into two plot lines. The majority of the page time is spent on Windle Poons, a 130 year old wizard who dies but doesn’t end. Instead, Windle becomes one of the undead. Together with his fellow undead and the staff of the Unseen University, Windle must deal with an overabundance of life force and a new threat to the city. The other plot line deals with Death himself. When he’s fired he’s given time before an eventual death of his own. He gets a job on a small farm and begins to live among humans.

Death’s a wonderful character, and his journey through Reaper Man is beautiful. He’s eager to understand humans and human experiences, but everything is new and almost out of his grasp. He starts to feel time encroaching when he wants nothing more than to go on living.

“Was that what it was really like to be alive? The feeling of darkness dragging you forward?
How could they live with it? And yet they did, and even seemed to find enjoyment in it, when surely the only sensible course would be to despair. Amazing. To feel you were a tiny living thing, sandwiched between two cliffs of darkness. How could they stand to be alive?”

While I’m not as interested in Windle’s character, it’s interesting how his path is almost the opposite of Death’s in that he suddenly has more time, not less. But both Death and Windle learn to find value in the time they have.

Like with the best Discworld books, Reaper Man makes you both laugh and think, moving from hysterically funny one moment to thought provoking the next, sometimes managing to be both at the same time. It’s a book I’ve loved for a long time and have been able to share with friends and with my dad. It’s a book that I would recommend to everyone. After all, we are all human and will have to meet Death someday.

Originally posted on The Illustrated Page. ( )
1 vote pwaites | Apr 6, 2015 |
Oh those pesky Auditors! Always meddling in other's business. This time they have interfered with Death. He is given a life span, and a short one at that, so what does Death do when he knows his time is running out?
This is a great story, full of wizards, undead, Life and Death. We also meet the Death of Rats. On top of all the laughter are the underlying themes of life and death and why it all matters so much. I won't say Pratchett has the answer, but he sure makes the questions fun to ponder. ( )
  MrsLee | Jan 20, 2015 |
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» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Terry Pratchettprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kirby, RonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Planer, NigelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
[None]
Dedication
[None]
First words
The Morris Dance is common to all inhabited worlds in the multiverse.
Quotations
Five exclamation marks, the sure sign of an insane mind.
WHAT CAN THE HARVEST HOPE FOR, IF NOT FOR THE CARE OF THE REAPER MAN?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
DEATH IS MISSING - PRESUMED…ER…GONE.

Which leads to the kind of chaos you always get when an important public service is withdrawn.

Meanwhile, on a little farm far, far away, a tall dark stranger is turning out to be really good with a scythe. There's a harvest to be gathered in…
Haiku summary
When Death retires,
Who will replace him? And will
He be any good?
(espadrile)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061020621, Mass Market Paperback)

They say there are only two things you can count on ...

But that was before DEATH started pondering the existential. Of course, the last thing anyone needs is a squeamish Grim Reaper and soon his Discworld bosses have sent him off with best wishes and a well-earned gold watch. Now DEATH is having the time of his life, finding greener pastures where he can put his scythe to a whole new use.

But like every cutback in an important public service, DEATH's demise soon leads to chaos and unrest -- literally, for those whose time was supposed to be up, like Windle Poons. The oldest geezer in the entire faculty of Unseen University -- home of magic, wizardry, and big dinners -- Windle was looking forward to a wonderful afterlife, not this boring been-there-done-that routine. To get the fresh start he deserves, Windle and the rest of Ankh-Morpork's undead and underemployed set off to find DEATH and save the world for the living (and everybody else, of course).

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:24:21 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

When the Grim Reaper begins to ponder the existential, his Discworld bosses send him off with best wishes and a well-earned gold watch. Death is now having the time of his life, but like every cutback in public service, Death's demise soon leads to chaos and unrest. The 11th novel of Pratchett's Discworld series. (August).… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

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