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Pyramids by Terry Pratchett
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Pyramids (original 1989; edition 1997)

by Terry Pratchett, Josh Kirby (Cover artist)

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7,97885408 (3.8)162
Member:Kampuskop
Title:Pyramids
Authors:Terry Pratchett
Other authors:Josh Kirby (Cover artist)
Info:Corgi (1997), Mass Market Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:humour, Discworld Series

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Pyramids by Terry Pratchett (1989)

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» See also 162 mentions

English (80)  Polish (1)  Danish (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (85)
Showing 1-5 of 80 (next | show all)
I have a love/hate r'ship with the Discworld books.
I enjoy every encounter I have with Rincewind, the Luggage, and the Librarian.
Carrot is mildly interesting
Bits of concepts throughout the series are clever.
Pretty much the rest of the characters, and books, annoy and/or frustrate me. ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
I just finished it. I wanted to like it more.
I enjoyed the Gree--er, Ephebian characters quite a bit. And of course the Priests (Dios...or should I say, Khuft?? I think I got that part right, at least.)
And Teppic. My pubescent inner monologue loved the beginning of the book: the caltrops, numbered throwing knives, inhumation techniques, etc.
I plan to read 'Hogfather' for Christmas even though I was slightly disappointed.
'Soul Music' and 'Small Gods' may influence my continued love (and reading) of Pratchett
( )
  apomonis | Jun 2, 2016 |
This book is a more-or-less standalone novel in the Discworld universe. The chart shows it as the start of the Ancient Civilizations subseries, but it only has a dotted line (minor connection) to other books.

I enjoyed this, but not as much as some of the previous Discworld books. The protagonist is Teppic, the only son of the king of a small kingdom. This kingdom has stayed relatively unchanged for about 7000 years and its citizens rarely venture beyond its borders. They value ritual and tradition and they’re terrified of change. One of those traditions includes mummifying their kings and building pyramids to place them in. Pyramids are apparently very tricky things…

Before the book begins, Teppic decides to go off to assassin’s school. The book starts with Teppic taking his final exam, with brief flashbacks about how he got there. The early part, where Teppic was still at the school, was the part I enjoyed the most. After that, my interest in the story fluctuated. I enjoyed it over-all, but it was easy to put the book down. Teppic annoyed me sometimes, because I thought he handled some things too passively. However, the other characters were far worse. The Pratchett-style humor is still there in full force, though, and I laughed out loud several times.

This book did have one awesome thing going for it, though. Camels! I love camels because they have funny faces, and Discworld’s version of camels are pretty funny too. I wanted to read more about the camels. ( )
  YouKneeK | May 30, 2016 |
This book is mostly set in the Discworld equivalents of Ancient Egypt. We meet Teppic, crown prince, in the first chapters, studying at the Assassins’ Guild in Ankh Morpork. This is the book in which the ‘guilds’ are properly introduced, a concept which I’ve always liked. Teppic is a likeable young man despite his unpleasant profession, but almost as soon as he finishes his final exam, he has to return to his home country to take up his duties as King...

There are classical and other allusions on almost every page: the Discworld equivalent countries of Troy and Greece are involved in war, as usual; the king has regular dreams about seven fat and thin cows; the pyramids possess some kind of mystical power that is only gradually understood as the book progresses.

This book makes good, undemanding light bedtime reading, and it’s a clever, if rather complex plot. As with many of the Discworld series, this one stands alone. It would make quite a good introduction to Pratchett for anyone interested in or intrigued by ancient history, but it’s also good to re-read as part of the series.

Recommended. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Apr 30, 2016 |
Pyramids (Book 7 in Discworld Series) by Terry Pratchett

★★★

It took a lot to get back into reading. I started many books trying to find one light-hearted enough to keep me occupied but not thinking (I know, I don’t want to think right now). Luckily, I know I can rely on Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series to be an easy read and put a smile on my face. Of course, even this easy 327 page books took me nearly a month to read. Either way it’s a book read and a high-five to me.

All excitement aside that I finished a book, this wasn’t my favorite Discworld book so far. It took me awhile to get into it but again, this could be more about my state of mind instead of the content of the book. I did enjoy the main characters (not as much as some other characters I’ve enjoyed in past Discworld books) within the tale and eventually got into the storyline as well. I enjoyed the historical aspects found on the Egyptian culture with a twist and the family bonds. As usual, Pratchett’s comedic writing was found throughout the book and is what I needed.
( )
  UberButter | Feb 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 80 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (23 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pratchett, Terryprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ittekot, VenugopalanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirby, JoshCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paolini, Pier FrancescoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Planer, NigelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
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First words
Nothing but stars, scattered across the blackness as though the Creator had smashed the windscreen of his car and hadn't bothered to sweep up the pieces.
Quotations
All assassins had a full-length mirror in their rooms, because it would be a terrible insult to anyone to kill them when you were badly dressed.
The ancestors pressed forward, muttering. When you've been dead for hundreds of years, you're not inclined to feel generous to those people who assured you that you were going to have a lovely time.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Pteppic geht nach Ankh-Morpork um Assassine zu werden. Dann wird er Pharao und baut eine Pyramide. Doch dabei gibt es Ärger und er muss feststellen, dass es sehr schwierig ist eine Pyramide zu töten.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061020656, Mass Market Paperback)

It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun.First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad -- a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal -- not to mention aheadstrong handmaiden -- at the heart of his realm.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:59 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Unlike most teenaged boys, Teppic isn't chasing girls and working at the mall. Instead he's just inherited the throne of the desert kingdom of Djelibeybi-a job that's come a bit earlier than he expected (a turn of fate his recently departed father wasn't too happy about either). It's bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn't a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he's been trained at Ankh-Morpork's famed assassins' school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there's the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad-a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal-not to mention a headstrong handmaiden-at the heart of his realm.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

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