HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid…
Loading...

The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and… (edition 2010)

by Timothy Ferriss

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7211813,038 (3.55)2
Member:JeffV
Title:The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman
Authors:Timothy Ferriss
Info:Crown Archetype (2010), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 592 pages
Collections:Your library, To read
Rating:*****
Tags:Non-fiction, Fitness, Health, Self-improvement

Work details

The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Becoming Superhuman by Timothy Ferriss

Recently added byBBBeauchamp, arogers24, private library, Whammywizz, Benedict8
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
Kind of wanders a bit, but Ferris has some really fascinating arguments for a strict diet for shedding fat and building muscle. ( )
  MorganGMac | Feb 13, 2014 |
Any book rating is subjective, but I suspect that ratings of this book are necessarily more subjective than most, in part because the book is constantly selling - the author's brand, his commercial partners, a lifestyle. It's hard to see this being useful to readers other than men in their 20s and 30s who are deeply involved in maximizing their physical (specifically, muscular) development. The sections on sex and sleep are thrown in to boost sales (more on that below), while the sections on workout regimens take a great deal of background for granted. I don't fit the target audience, so most of the book was gibberish. But, it was interesting reading as a kind of social artifact:

* By chance, I recently read the essay The Divided Brain and the Search for Meaning by Ian McGilchrist, echoing themes from his longer book, The Master and His Emissary. McGilchrist argues that modern civilization has unwisely elevated the left brain - which views the world as a machine or collection of discrete rules and constantly tries to engineer it - over the right brain, the seat of holistic perception, wisdom, and insight. The 4hour Body is an object lesson in McGilchrist's thesis; Ferriss treats everything as a set of rules that can be manipulated to achieve whatever results you want, if you're smart enough to figure out the hack. But there's no wisdom here to ground it, just endless engineering.

* Over the last decade, several science fiction authors have explored the question of whether intelligent behavior can evolve without consciousness - or, in a related form, whether a conscious species can evolve in such a way that, having had self-awareness, it loses it, while retaining language and other symbols of intelligence. (This trope can, of course, be used as a metaphor for the unexamined life, but most of these authors have meant it literally). I found it hard to read Ferriss' manic self-promotion and obsession with achieving the fittest body, without wondering if this is what intelligence without self-awareness would look like.

* Except, of course, that the book is part of a carefully and relentlessly constructed brand, and who knows how it actually relates to Ferriss' inner world. In an interview with a reviewer, Ferriss mentions reading (and liking) the Stoic Roman philosopher Seneca; and his undergraduate degree in East Asian studies must have exposed him to Buddhist concepts of non-attachment. None of that comes through in the book. What does, is sex. The sex advice in The 4Hour Body is very basic - it drops names, but has no more information in it than one could gather from a couple issues of Men's Health magazine. Yet, in every public discussion of the book, sex features prominently, and whenever the book is criticized (often for applying its mechanistic approach to sex, as it does to everything else), Ferriss' response has been designed to further highlight those two chapters. It's not hard to see why; sex is the book's best hope for carrying buzz and sales beyond the narrow primary market.

Ultimately, The 4Hour Body is less a book than a cross-promotion of the author's brand. It's not science; it's hard to tell what parts of it, if any, are true; but all of that is irrelevant. And if you try to follow the huckster's advice, and it makes you sick, or sore, or just plain hormonally nuts, well - YMMV. ( )
1 vote bezoar44 | Dec 21, 2013 |
How to turn your body into a chemistry set. ( )
  weeta | Sep 12, 2013 |
Definitely a good book for people are more athletic and suffering pain. I learned a bit about different methods of healing the body--sort of makes you wonder about mainstream medicine that focused on meds and surgery. I do like his approach, which is to test things out on himself and others. ( )
  MochiMama | Aug 21, 2013 |
This book has it all. I've been testing ways to improve fat loss, increase my running times, increase muscle size, and generally getting healthier by exercise, vitamins, nutrients, and studying.what Tim has done was placed a lot of the information I've studied over the past couple of years into one book and then multiplied it by 1000! OMG the amount of information is staggering! And it's not just an all or nothing approach, you can hand pick any area you want to focus on and he has given you what to do, the science behind it, and the test results to boot! This is one book that you'll keep handy to refer to down the road when you're ready torun that ultra marathon,or dead lift like an Olympian, etc. Amazing! ( )
  capiam1234 | Aug 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
It’s among the craziest, most breathless things I’ve ever read, and I’ve read Klaus Kinski, Dan Brown and Snooki... “The 4-Hour Body” reads as if The New England Journal of Medicine had been hijacked by the editors of the SkyMall catalog. Some of this junk might actually work, but you’re going to be embarrassed doing it or admitting to your friends that you’re trying it. This is a man who, after all, weighs his own feces, likes bloodletting as a life-extension strategy and aims a Philips goLite at his body in place of ingesting caffeine.
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For my parents, who taught a little troublemaker that marching to a different drummer was a good thing. I love you both and owe you everything. Mum, sorry about all the crazy experiments.
For my parents, who taught a little hellion that marching to a different drummer was a good thing. I love you both and owe you everything. Mom, sorry about all the crazy experiments.
First words
Shoreline Amphitheatre was rocking.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 030746363X, Hardcover)

Thinner, bigger, faster, stronger... which 150 pages will you read?

Is it possible to:
Reach your genetic potential in 6 months?
Sleep 2 hours per day and perform better than on 8 hours?
Lose more fat than a marathoner by bingeing?

Indeed, and much more. This is not just another diet and fitness book.

The 4-Hour Body is the result of an obsessive quest, spanning more than a decade, to hack the human body. It contains the collective wisdom of hundreds of elite athletes, dozens of MDs, and thousands of hours of jaw-dropping personal experimentation. From Olympic training centers to black-market laboratories, from Silicon Valley to South Africa, Tim Ferriss, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek, fixated on one life-changing question:

For all things physical, what are the tiniest changes that produce the biggest results?

Thousands of tests later, this book contains the answers for both men and women. From the gym to the bedroom, it’s all here, and it all works.

You Will Learn (in less than 30 minutes each):
* How to lose those last 5-10 pounds (or 100+ pounds) with odd combinations of food and safe chemical cocktails.
* How to prevent fat gain while bingeing (X-mas, holidays, weekends)
* How to increase fat-loss 300% with a few bags of ice
* How Tim gained 34 pounds of muscle in 28 days, without steroids, and in four hours of total gym time
* How to sleep 2 hours per day and feel fully rested
* How to produce 15-minute female orgasms
* How to triple testosterone and double sperm count
* How to go from running 5 kilometers to 50 kilometers in 12 weeks
* How to reverse “permanent” injuries
* How to add 150+ pounds to your lifts in 6 months
* How to pay for a beach vacation with one hospital visit
       
And that's just the tip of the iceberg.  There are more than 50 topics covered, all with real-world experiments, many including more than 200 test subjects.

You don't need better genetics or more discipline. You need immediate results that compel you to continue.

That’s exactly what The 4-Hour Body delivers.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:29:46 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The best-selling author of The 4-Hour Workweek outlines a program for healthy living that draws on 15 years of research and interviews with leading doctors and health-care experts to offer insight into genetic factors, nutrition requirements and fitness practices.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 avail.
883 wanted
3 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5 1
1 5
1.5 2
2 11
2.5 2
3 33
3.5 13
4 44
4.5 2
5 25

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,695,693 books! | Top bar: Always visible