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Words by Ginny L/ Yttrup
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The author, Ginny Yttrup, writes from the perspective of a child sexual abuse survivor; her WORDS ring true. Those of us who have lived through abuse will appreciate the cathartic aspect of this book . . whether, or not, you ascribe to the significant Christian/religious undertone, this book will - most certainly - have an impact. ( )
  idajo | May 8, 2016 |
This was such a powerful book. Kaylee Wren is a young ten year old girl abandoned by her mother. She is left with her mother’s boyfriend. When the mother doesn’t return the boyfriend burns all of the mother’s possessions and most of Kaylee’s things. She is left there for him to do with as he pleases, and he does.

Kaylee clings to a dictionary and two other books left by her mother. Two books “he” doesn’t know she has. She has stopped talking. She keeps her words in her head. This is the one place he can not find them and take them away. She is a survivor. As I read I wondered how she was still alive. She was hungry and dirty. She holds out hope that her mother will come back for her. She even tells her self that her mother has amnesia. This is how she deals with the situation.

The imagery and use of metaphors is wonderful. The author uses the redwood tree and its resilience to explain how Kaylee is a survivor. In the story, when Kaylee can steal away from the cabin, she hides in the base of a redwood tree. She keeps those things she holds most dear in that tree. It is here that Sierra, an artist, finds her. The meeting of these two is not by chance. Sierra is dealing with the anniversary of her own daughter’s death. Twelve years earlier she had given birth to a daughter who lived only nine days. Drugs she took while pregnant was the root cause of her daughter’s death. Sierra has been running from the pain and from God for a long time. With Sierra’s painful past, and Kaylee’s current pain, only God could bring two dysfunctional people together to show how God can heal. Kaylee uses words to protect her and help her heal. Seirra dives into her art. She talked about building layer upon layer, yet after Kaylee entered her life she begins to peel away layer after layer of her past.

It is proof that a person must deal with the past instead of holding it in, if they are to ever begin the healing process. Forgiveness must be given for complete healing. We see both Kaylee and Sierra dealing with their past. We also see that they have learned that dealing with their past through God’s helping love is so much easier.

This is a book I highly recommend. Don’t let the topic of sexual abuse scare you away. The messages of hope, forgiveness, redemption and love are more than enough to combat the scary topic. This powerful book will take you on a rollercoaster ride you will not soon forget. ( )
  skstiles612 | Dec 12, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I never thought I'd find myself reading a Christian Fiction book but when I got a message saying I'd won an ARC of Words, I thought why not give it a fair shot? The story sounded genuinely interesting despite my concerns about how strong the religious overtones were going to be.

The two main characters Kaylee and Sierra are remarkably developed for a debut novel, they both have complex histories and are wonderfully flawed. Although very mature for a ten year old Kaylee still has a childish personality that comes across in her POV chapters. She's got a quirky sense of humour which considering the horrors she's been through shows her amazing strength of character.

Sierra is a very admirable woman for actually taking it upon herself to help Kaylee out of her awful situation when so many people in this day and age would just walk away and stay out of what isn't their business. It gives a hopeful message that there are some truly good people in a world where evil people often get away with the terrible acts they commit in their isolated corners of society.

On occasions the religious aspects of the book got a tad intense, I don't quite care for being told over and over that Jesus is the only way to find the truth/only way to forgiveness etc. but as it wasn't continuous through the whole book it didn't detract from the enjoyment of the story too much.

Overall it was an interesting and uplifting book with realistic and unique characters that make for enjoyable yet serious read. ( )
  LadyViolet | Jul 4, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I finally finished a book I started months ago. Words, by Ginny L. Yttrup, started with a woman struggling with her past. Sierra, an artist who creates her works from the memories of her pain, is still struggling with the death of her baby daughter 15 years prior. She blames herself since at the time she was a drug addict and the baby died a couple of weeks after birth. One day while out hiking she sees a little girl. This child was out in the middle of nowhere and clearly uncared for. After many attempts at finding this child again she does find her and finds that the child is being abused.

Kaylee, doesn't know where her mother is, but knows she must have amnesia or she would have come back to this cabin to get her instead of leaving her with him. She is able to find solace in her books, particularly a dictionary that was her mother's. Kaylee loves words and has a great memory. However since her mother left, she is unable to speak. She sees the woman with the dog when she is out by her special tree one day.

That meeting led to Kaylee's rescue from the cabin and her eventual placement with Sierra. How this situation heals them both and not only do Kaylee's words save her, but The Word does most of all.

Overall, readable, but definitely would land in the Christian Fiction section. At the end, the religious aspect seems a little thrown at the reader, as if it was a point that was going to be made regardless of where the story went. But, I enjoyed this title. Both of the main characters were compelling and well written. ( )
  princesspeaches | Jun 9, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book kept me pretty interested throughout and ended up being quite a nice story. I almost didn't continue reading it due to the amount of religion, especially at the beginning (God is mentioned a lot in the beginning which can turn you off if that is not your thing). During the middle religion isn't in the story too much which kept me reading, but it does creep back in quite a lot at the end. The book has a good story and characters, and had potential to be very good if it took out some parts. ( )
  elli0188 | May 15, 2011 |
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I collect words.
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from amazon com:Product Description
"I collect words. I keep them in a box in my mind. I'd like to keep them in a real box, something pretty, maybe a shoe box covered with flowered wrapping paper. Whenever I wanted, I'd open the box and pick up the papers, reading and feeling the words all at once. Then I could hide the box. But the words are safer in my mind. There, he can't take them."

Ten-year old Kaylee Wren doesn't speak. Not since her drug-addled mother walked away, leaving her in a remote cabin nestled in the towering redwoods-in the care of a man who is as dangerous as he is evil. With silence her only refuge, Kaylee collects words she might never speak from the only memento her mother left behind: a dictionary.

Sierra Dawn is thirty-four, an artist, and alone. She has allowed the shame of her past to silence her present hopes and chooses to bury her pain by trying to control her circumstances. But on the twelfth anniversary of her daughter's death, Sierra's control begins to crumble as the God of her childhood woos her back to Himself.

Brought together by Divine design, Kaylee and Sierra will discover together the healing mercy of the Word-Jesus Christ.

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"Ten-year old Kaylee Wren doesn't speak. Not since her drug-addled mother walked away, leaving her in a remote cabin nestled in the towering redwoods--in the care of a man who is as dangerous as he is evil. With silence her only refuge, Kaylee collects words she might never speak from the only memento her mother left behind: a dictionary. Sierra Dawn is thirty-four, an artist, and alone. She has allowed the shame of her past to silence her present hopes and chooses to bury her pain by trying to control her circumstances. But on the twelfth anniversary of her daughter's death, Sierra's control begins to crumble as the God of her childhood woos her back to Himself. Brought together by Divine design, Kaylee and Sierra will discover together the healing mercy of the word--Jesus Christ."--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

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