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Redemption: Freed by Jesus from the Idols We…
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Redemption: Freed by Jesus from the Idols We Worship and the Wounds We… (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Mike Wilkerson

Series: Re:Lit

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134289,677 (4.17)None
Member:Coughout
Title:Redemption: Freed by Jesus from the Idols We Worship and the Wounds We Carry (Re:Lit)
Authors:Mike Wilkerson
Info:Crossway Books (2011), Paperback, 208 pages
Collections:Your library, Read
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Redemption: Freed by Jesus from the Idols We Worship and the Wounds We Carry (RE: Lit) by Mike Wilkerson (2011)

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With the requisite arty title and front cover, this is a fairly aesthetically attractive book, but with a bold and challenging subtitle; "Freed by Jesus from the Idols we Worship and the Wounds We Carry", this is a book that intrigued me the minute I'd heard about it, and invited me to read it once it arrived. This is a book that stands in the puritan and Reformed tradition, and in my opinion is all the better for it. It aims to be a work of deeply biblical and utterly practical pastoral theology, and I would contend that Wilkerson succeeds in this.

Structurally, the book is very straightforward Each chapter ends with discussion/reflection questions, which add value to this book in that it could be used as a devotional or as the basis for a small study group series. Also at the end of each chapter are relevant scripture references, and also various books, sermons and article recommendations. This is not a book that one 'just reads', you will be inspired and challenge to read more; further and deeper into the freedom we have in Jesus.

One of the hardest things that many Christians struggle to do - at least, to do as an outworking of their Christian lives - is to forgive people. Wilkerson offers an excellent model for this, including engaging with difficult questions such as the consequences of forgiveness. This discussion takes place in the chapter entitled "Passover: At Your Worst, God Gives His Best", which firmly sets this practical pastoral discussion within the wider story of God's redemption of his people. This is a hallmark of this book, setting individual situations within the bigger story, without compromising the place of either.

Tied up in the whole idea of redemption from sins is, for many Christians, the struggle to move on from a sin. For young guys, at least in my experience and friendship group, moving on from a struggle with lust is difficult. Wilkerson tackles this issue, this issue of stopping habitual sin. We go through the various ways that people try to defeat habitual sin. After the vital observation that "you'll never have a risk-free life as long as you live in a fallen world", a crucially important point is made; "Your only true hope for lasting healing that shields you from shame is Jesus". Wilkerson then expertly deals with the balance of the now and the not yet, the process begun and the hope of what is to come. For me, and for some of my friends, this small pair of paragraphs is worth the price of entry to this book!

The title of this book is "Redemption", and the closing chapter, the epilogue, is snappily titled "The Redeemer's Mission". I love how Wilkerson defines that mission, and it echoes what I've been saying throughout my review, and its an understanding of the Gospel that permeates the whole book. He opens his final chunk thusly; "God doesn't redeem you and me just so we can be happier all by ourselves; he is on a mission to make his name known to the whole world. We who have been redeemed are swept up into his story and sent out on his mission". Amen. That understanding of the individuals redemption being part of a bigger story is big news. Its another reason I liked and will recommend this book. Get a copy, read a copy, especially if you are in any pastoral role, and consider again the joy of the redemption that we have in Jesus Christ. ( )
  Admiralcreedy | Nov 15, 2012 |
A helpful drawing together of the history of Israel as recounted in Exodus and the history of every believer. To be used as the guide for NCS 2012 theme. ( )
  ggannell | Oct 22, 2011 |
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To Trisha who--next to Jesus--is the most vivid daily reminder of God's abounding steadfast love for me.
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The idea for this book was conceived on the front lines of ministry at Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Washington, within a team of pastors working inthe counseling and discipleship ministries.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 143352077X, Paperback)

Exodus is a real story about God redeeming his people from the bondage of slavery and how their difficult journey home exposed their loyalties—though wounded by Egypt, they had come to worship its gods. Most Christians don’t make golden idols like the Israelites in the wilderness, but we do set up idols on our own desert road—idols like substance abuse, pornography, gluttony, and rage. And even those who don’t know the pain of actual slavery can feel enslaved to the fear and shame that follow sexual abuse or betrayal by a spouse, for we suffer at the hands of our idols as well as those created by others. We need more than self-improvement or comfort—we need redemption.

Redemption is not a step-oriented recovery book; it’s story-oriented and Bible-anchored. It unfolds the back-story of redemption in Exodus to help Christians better understand how Christ redeems us from the slavery of abuse, addiction and assorted trouble and restores us to our created purpose, the worship of God. Readers will discover that the reward of freedom is more than victory over a habitual sin or release from shame; it is satisfaction and rest in God himself. Part of the Re:Lit series.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:19 -0400)

Exodus is a real story about God redeeming his people from the bondage of slavery and how their difficult journey home exposed their loyalties—though wounded by Egypt, they had come to worship its gods. Most Christians don’t make golden idols like the Israelites in the wilderness, but we do set up idols on our own desert road—idols like substance abuse, pornography, gluttony, and rage. And even those who don’t know the pain of actual slavery can feel enslaved to the fear and shame that follow sexual abuse or betrayal by a spouse, for we suffer at the hands of our idols as well as those created by others. We need more than self-improvement or comfort—we need redemption.Redemption is not a step-oriented recovery book; it’s story-oriented and Bible-anchored. It unfolds the back-story of redemption in Exodus to help Christians better understand how Christ redeems us from the slavery of abuse, addiction and assorted trouble and restores us to our created purpose, the worship of God. Readers will discover that the reward of freedom is more than victory over a habitual sin or release from shame; it is satisfaction and rest in God himself. Part of the Re:Lit series.… (more)

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