HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and…
Loading...

The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos

by Brian Greene

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
701None13,493 (3.93)9
  1. 00
    Why Does the World Exist?: An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Touching on similar concepts, including Nozick's "Ultimate Multiverse" (there's isn't something rather than nothing, there's both).
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

English (21)  Swedish (1)  German (1)  All languages (23)
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
The multiverse - interviewed by Michael Krasney, KQED. ( )
  clifforddham | Mar 19, 2014 |
The bestselling author of The Elegant Universe and The Fabric of the Cosmos tackles perhaps the most mind-bending question in modern physics and cosmology: Is our universe the only universe?

There was a time when "universe" meant all there is. Everything. Yet, a number of theories are converging on the possibility that our universe may be but one among many parallel universes populating a vast multiverse. Here, Briane Greene, one of our foremost physicists and science writers, takes us on a breathtaking journey to a multiverse comprising an endless series of big bangs, a multiverse with duplicates of every one of us, a multiverse populated by vast sheets of spacetime, a multiverse in which all we consider real are holographic illusions, and even a multiverse made purely of math--and reveals the reality hidden within each.

Using his trademark wit and precision, Greene presents a thrilling survey of cutting-edge physics and confronts the inevitable question: How can fundamental science progress if great swaths of reality lie beyond our reach? The Hidden Reality is a remarkable adventure through a world more vast and strange than anything we could have imagined. ( )
  MarkBeronte | Jan 9, 2014 |
The Hidden Reality was more interesting because I had watched the Nova episodes based on Brian Greene's set of books. Remembering parts of the series made it easier for me to understand, otherwise I likely would have gotten lost.

One or two of the chapters did drag on and on, however, those were admittedly the parts where he'd said, look at this and skip the rest if you want to.

However, those are minor faults, and I did enjoy and learn from the book.

( )
  tramseyer | Dec 20, 2013 |
" Take the math seriously " ( )
  BakuDreamer | Sep 7, 2013 |
This is a book about the possibility that there exists an array (ie the multiverse) of universes. Brian Greene skilfully weaves an entertaining tale as he talks about many different conceivable styles for this multiverse. Some are tentative hypotheses, some inferred conjecture and several just wild speculation. Unsurprisingly for the author, string theory features strongly in the latter. He idly ponders on whether the reason such proposals are popping up in quite different theories could be because nature is offering hints about an actual multiversal format beneath our observable cosmos.

Of course it is more likely that such suggestions are a symptom of a general malaise gripping some who are greatly disappointed at the shortage of recent telling revelations. After all, multiverse proposals go against every inclination of science. It leaves us without an ultimate justification, cause, explanation or reason for anything. It would mean that things in our universe just are the way they are because we are here in this part or version.

It is difficult to fault Greene but be warned that readers are expected to be familiar with US culture. You will be expected to understand references to a Cartman on a mountaintop, the shape of a pringle, TMI, Blue Man Group, CliffsNotes and terms like get-go, and you had me at hello. ( )
  Jewsbury | Aug 1, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 21 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Alec and Sophia
First words
If, when I was growing up, my room had been adorned with only a single mirror, my childhood daydreams might have been very different.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
From the best-selling author of The Elegant Universe and The Fabric of the Cosmos comes his most expansive and accessible book to date—a book that takes on the grandest question: Is ours the only universe?

There was a time when “universe” meant all there is. Everything. Yet, in recent years discoveries in physics and cosmology have led a number of scientists to conclude that our universe may be one among many. With crystal-clear prose and inspired use of analogy, Brian Greene shows how a range of different “multiverse” proposals emerges from theories developed to explain the most refined observations of both subatomic particles and the dark depths of space: a multiverse in which you have an infinite number of doppelgängers, each reading this sentence in a distant universe; a multiverse comprising a vast ocean of bubble universes, of which ours is but one; a multiverse that endlessly cycles through time, or one that might be hovering millimeters away yet remains invisible; another in which every possibility allowed by quantum physics is brought to life. Or, perhaps strangest of all, a multiverse made purely of math.

Greene, one of our foremost physicists and science writers, takes us on a captivating exploration of these parallel worlds and reveals how much of reality’s true nature may be deeply hidden within them. And, with his unrivaled ability to make the most challenging of material accessible and entertaining, Greene tackles the core question: How can fundamental science progress if great swaths of reality lie beyond our reach?

Sparked by Greene’s trademark wit and precision, The Hidden Reality is at once a far-reaching survey of cutting-edge physics and a remarkable journey to the very edge of reality—a journey grounded firmly in science and limited only by our imagination.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0307265633, Hardcover)

Amazon Best Books of the Month, January 2011: Take any of physics' major theories of the fundamental nature of the universe, extrapolate its math to the logical extreme, and you get some version of a (so far unobservable) parallel universe. And who better to navigate these hypothetical versions of the "multiverse" than Brian Greene? Normally an unflinching apologist for string theory, the bestselling author of The Elegant Universe and The Fabric of the Cosmos here treats all viable alternate realities to a laudably fair shake. For a book exploring the most far-reaching implications of bleeding-edge mathematics, The Hidden Reality is surprisingly light on math, written as it is "for a broad audience … its only prerequisite the will to persevere." Such perseverance pays off with a motley cast of potential universes featuring doppelgängers, strings, branes, quantum probabilities, holographs, and simulated worlds. The result is that rare accomplishment in science writing for a popular audience: a volume that explains the science and its consequences while stimulating the imagination of even the uninitiated.

Oliver Sacks on The Hidden Reality

Oliver Sacks was born in London and educated in London, Oxford, California, and New York. He is professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University, and Columbia's first University Artist. He is the author of many books, including Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and Musicophilia. His newest book, The Mind's Eye, was published in October, 2010.

Brian Greene is not only a profound cosmological thinker--a pioneer of string theory--but a writer of exceptional clarity and charm. His books--The Elegant Universe and The Fabric of the Cosmos among them--take one ever deeper into a universe stranger and more wonderful than anyone could have conceived a generation ago. The Hidden Reality takes us deeper still, and it has a special personal quality and warmth that is evident from the opening of the book, when Greene recollects how, as a boy, he was fascinated by the multiple reflections in parallel mirrors. He has never lost this childlike wonder at the world of physics, but he brings it now to examining theories of multiple universes, of the continual birth of universes, starting long before our own. . . and destined to continue, perhaps, to the end of time.

In the 1930s, as a boy myself, I read The Mysterious Universe by James Jeans. Jeans was, like Greene, a brilliant theoretical astronomer and equally mesmerizing writer. I thought Jeans's book was the most exciting, revelatory book I had ever read, and now, seventy years later, I feel the same excitement reading Brian Greene's new book, where every chapter opens level after level of previously unimaginable, mind-expanding realities.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:27:19 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"The Hidden Reality" reveals how major developments in different branches of fundamental theoretical physics -- relativistic, quantum, cosmological, unified, computational -- have all led us to consider one or another variety of parallel universe.

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
295 wanted4 pay8 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 16
3.5 6
4 40
4.5 2
5 24

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,410,067 books! | Top bar: Always visible