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Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens by J. M.…
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Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (original 1906; edition 1995)

by J. M. Barrie

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641921,867 (3.89)37
Member:grunin
Title:Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens
Authors:J. M. Barrie
Info:Penguin (1995), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Fiction, Mini, Fantasy, read

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Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens by J. M. Barrie (1906)

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» See also 37 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Not the plot or characters of the later play by J.M Barrie. Interesting to see how the story evolved into its modern version. ( )
  FoxTribeMama | Sep 21, 2016 |
1926 American edition. Love, love, love these illustrations! ( )
  Krumbs | Mar 31, 2013 |
W...T...H? Parts of it made very interesting set-ups for the canon of Peter Pan, but parts of it were definitely not appropriate for children; the last chapter deals greatly with children dying (falling out of their prams, being left to starve/freeze in the gardens, etc.) and Peter burying their dead bodies. It also mentions the "bad fairies" slaughtering children that get discovered in the gardens after closing time. This, to me, is the reason that you can't just /trust/ that a children's book is appropriate for its intended audience (this and the original Little Mermaid). ( )
  benuathanasia | Mar 28, 2013 |
Where did Peter Pan come from and how did he learn to fly? This story is a delightful collaboration between Barrie and his young friend. Though it has much of the uncomfortable observation about the mother-son relationship found in Peter and Wendy, it does not have the noble savages or other stereotypes found in the latter book.
  missamellon | Mar 12, 2012 |
This was written after Peter Pan but is a prequel. There is lots of information and anecdotes about Kensington Gardens in London as well as the story of Peter Pan and how he came to be the boy who never grew up. There is a story about how prospective parents ask the birds for a child and that is why children think they can fly as they were born as baby birds.

Not all of the stories feature Peter Pan, the first half is a series of short tales about the different sights in the gardens and some of the children who have visited. It also talks about Barrie’s visits with the children to the gardens and I am ashamed to admit that while I have been living by London for nearly 10 years I still haven’t been to the gardens. I really must go and see if the monuments and sights have changed much since Barrie’s time.

This was beautifully illustrated by Arthur Rackham with over 50 full colour illustrations plus many pen drawings and this was how I found the book even existed. It was funny, sweet and makes a lovely collection to anyone’s library. ( )
1 vote Rhinoa | Aug 23, 2010 |
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
J. M. Barrieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Arthur RackhamEditormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bedford, F.D.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rackham, ArthurIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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If you ask your mother whether she knew about Peter Pan when she was a little girl she will say, "Why, of course, I did, child," and if you ask her whether he rode on a goat in those days she will say, "What a foolish question to ask, certainly he did."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0146000773, Paperback)

Excellent book and enjoyment!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:01:05 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Before he flew away to Neverland, the little boy who wouldn't grow up dwelt in the heart of London, with birds and fairies as his companions. This whimsical romp introduces Peter Pan, who discovered the magic of everyday existence amid the trees and flowers of Kensington Gardens-the very place where J. M. Barrie met the children who inspired his classic stories. Acclaimed by the Times of London as "one of the most charming books ever written," Barrie's fantasy was published in 1907 with 50 stunning color illustrations by Arthur Rackham. This magnificent keepsake edition features all of Rackham's winsome images of Peter's adventures. Readers of all ages will delight in following the exuberant child as he sets sail in a boat built by thrushes from an island in the Serpentine to the enchanted Kensington Gardens, where fairies dance to the music of his pan-pipes and teach him to fly.… (more)

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