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Freaks, Geeks & Asperger Syndrome: A User…
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Freaks, Geeks & Asperger Syndrome: A User Guide to Adolescence (2002)

by Luke Jackson

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Written by a thirteen-year-old who has Asperger syndrome, this is a book for adolescents. Luke is acutely aware of just how different he is and how little information is available for adolescents like himself. Drawing from his own experiences and gaining information from his teenage brother and sisters, he wrote this enlightening, honest and witty book in an attempt to address difficult topics such as bullying, friendships, when and where to tell others about Asperger syndrome, school problems, dating and relationships, and mortality.
  ThePinesLibrary | Apr 14, 2014 |
I would recommend this book to parents, teachers and especially Autistic kids, no matter where they are on the spectrum. Luke not only provides invaluable insight into how AS affects his life, but how Autism affects the lives of his two younger brothers. He also provides helpful, bullet point, lists on how to manage everything from sleeping, homework and even dating.

The title is quite apt, because this is truly a guide to handling many of the challenges teens with Autism face on a daily basis.

Additionally, I would recommend this book to any authors attempting to write fictional stories featuring Autistic characters. Luke breaks down a lot of stereotypes prevalent in pop culture today.

He is witty, optimistic and has a great deal insightful in to human social behavior. His sense of humor is charming and very relatable. I personally found his unique perspective on the subtly of language and contradictions in social expectations to be enlightening.

This book a fun, informative read. I really cannot recommend it enough. ( )
  EinfachMich | Sep 21, 2013 |
Author Luke Jackson is a 13-year-old British boy with Asperger Syndrome. He has written this book in order to help AS kids understand themselves, and help parents and caregivers understand their charges. As such, it is an invaluable resource. Luke writes with clarity and humor, explaining from the inside of an AS mind why these kids do what they do, and validating their feelings and struggles. Except for some British slang and idioms, any of my AS clients would find his work understandable and relatable. Also helpful is a list of resources at the back of the book for more information on AS, ADHD and Autism. ( )
  EmScape | Nov 28, 2012 |
I haven't received this in the mail yet. My daughter is 12 with Asperger Syndrome and I was really hoping it would help her to make sense of life.
  FaithF | Mar 27, 2010 |
This is a fantastic book regardless of why you are reading it. I have worked in the past, and still do, with children who have AS and this was my main reason for reading it. It has such a different feel from other books as he is only 13 and this comes across so much in the book. I have read other books by teenagers and young adults with the same condition and they are equally just as good. I liked the fact that it all seemed to be Luke coming through rather than an adult's influence (apart from the obvious guidance and tidying up a book would need before it gets published).

The topics he covers are very relevant to those who have AS and those who come in contact with AS. Aspects such as bullying, fixations, sleeping, sports, friendships, dating, difficulties at school and language are dealt with brilliantly. However the most pertinent chapter for me was the one about when to tell a child they have AS.

Luke used his immediate sources - mother and siblings to help him with some of the content so that others with the condition can understand how people see them and this was such a good part of the book. I loved the idioms he uses and laughed out loud in many places. Not only will it give people an insight there is also practical information in there with websites, books and dietary information (also discussed in his other book). A fabulous read that is both inspirational and refreshing. ( )
1 vote SmithSJ01 | Apr 29, 2008 |
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Epigraph
If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away. (Henry David Thoreau, 1854)
Dedication
In memory of Emma-Jane. So little, so beautiful, so loved and so missed.
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Foreword (by Tony Attwood) -- At last we have a book for adolescents with Asperger Syndrome, written by a thirteen-year-old who has a diagnosis of Asperger Syndrome.
Acknowledgements -- Although people with Asperger Syndrome like routines and familiarity, and I am no different, I am aware that to be predictable in the way I write and what I say would be boring to those of you that are reading this book, especially those of you who have already read my other book.
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Offers insights by a teenager with Asperger's syndrome into the difficulties of the disorder, including information on fascinations and obsessions, sensory perception, sleep, bullies, moral dilemmas, eating, and socializing.

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