HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Memory Chalet by Tony Judt
Loading...

The Memory Chalet (edition 2011)

by Tony Judt

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4221725,093 (3.94)98
Member:PegMc
Title:The Memory Chalet
Authors:Tony Judt
Info:Penguin Books (2011), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 240 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work details

The Memory Chalet by Tony Judt

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 98 mentions

English (16)  Dutch (1)  All languages (17)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
The memory chalet by Tony Judt is a memoir that in scope and topic is comparable to Letter to D. by André Gorz. Describing roughly the same period, and the same political and social movements, The memory chalet is a light autobiography, in which the author looks back on his life. The memoir is written in very short episodes, and in a light, and very readable style. The main tone of the memoir is a sense of nostalia. ( )
  edwinbcn | May 2, 2016 |
So far I am having trouble mustering the interest. It is well written, but the nostalgia is lost on me. It is best appreciated by the generation before me, and especially those with a connection to England and Europe. The links of personal experience to how it fits in with the broader narrative and culture of England/Europe/world are not as strong or developed as I expected. ( )
  TheBookJunky | Apr 22, 2016 |
The second of these essays which discusses what it is like to live with advanced ALS, was revelatory for me and profoundly moving. ( )
  nmele | Apr 6, 2013 |
So far I am having trouble mustering the interest. It is well written, but the nostalgia is lost on me. It is best appreciated by the generation before me, and especially those with a connection to England and Europe. The links of personal experience to how it fits in with the broader narrative and culture of England/Europe/world are not as strong or developed as I expected. ( )
  BCbookjunky | Mar 31, 2013 |
This is a lovely book, and a very moving one, by one of the few public intellectuals who seemed capable of changing his mind. It's very different in tone from most of his work -- private rather than public, and very funny in spots (the story about French intellectuals is classic). It does treat some of the key themes that appear in Judt's historical writing, and some of those that he controversially addressed in periodicals.

The point of "The Memory Chalet", however, is not to persuade, but to reflect. Judt's prose is graceful and apt, a delight to read, his opinions illuminating, and his recreation of his own past a glimpse into another world. Finally, the way he discusses and deals with his illness and impending death is (as ever) enlightening, as well as inspiring. If I face an end that is anything half as difficult as his, I will try to remember to use this book as a guide. ( )
  annbury | Nov 3, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
In this way the pieces in “The Memory Chalet” — most of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books — form a mosaic of autobiographical fragments and a restatement of views more or less familiar from his earlier, less personal writings...With his own life drawing to a close Judt sees the era of social mobility, of which he was the beneficiary, and uncompromisingly high standards, of which he was the embodiment, coming to an end. The elegiac tone is more than simply personal: it’s a reminder that England, for all its failings, will never lose its capacity to generate lament.
 
These essays, which he couldn't write down for himself, are nevertheless wonderfully written. They capture his 1950s childhood in Putney, the dour, didactic direct grammar school that drove him on to Cambridge, his days of devotion and disillusion on a joyless kibbutz, his restless trek from one university and one country to another – and one wife to another – until New York finally came to seem like home. And Judt, start to finish, could never write a boring sentence.
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
'I love trains, and they have always loved me back.'
'I reject the authority of the rabbis - all of them (and for this I have rabbinical authority on my side).'
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
“It might be thought the height of poor taste to ascribe good fortune to a healthy man with a young family struck down at the age of sixty by an incurable degenerative disorder from which he must shortly die. But there is more than one sort of luck. To fall prey to a motor neuron disease is surely to have offended the Gods at some point, and there is nothing more to be said. But if you must suffer thus, better to have a well-stocked head…” –Tony Judt

The Memory Chalet is a memoir unlike any you have ever read before. Each essay charts some experience or remembrance of the past through the sieve of Tony Judt’s prodigious mind. His youthful love of a particular London bus route evolves into a reflection on public civility and interwar urban planning. Memories of the 1968 student riots of Paris meander through the divergent sex politics of Europe, before concluding that his generation ‘was a revolutionary generation, but missed the revolution’. A series of roadtrips across America lead not just to an appreciation of American history, but to an eventual acquisition of citizenship. Foods and trains and long-lost smells all compete for Judt’s attention; but for us, he has forged his reflections into an elegant arc of analysis. All as simply and beautifully arranged as a Swiss chalet — a reassuring refuge deep in the mountains of memory. [Amazon.co.uk]
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

The author reflects on the sights and events of the twentieth century, both impactful and trivial, and places it in context with his personal experiences and analysis of society.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
45 wanted4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 10
3.5 12
4 30
4.5 10
5 18

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 107,491,492 books! | Top bar: Always visible