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Shine by Lauren Myracle
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Shine (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Lauren Myracle

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6708914,303 (3.99)20
Member:mrinkerya
Title:Shine
Authors:Lauren Myracle
Info:Amulet Books (2011), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 376 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:friendship, hate crimes, homophobia, LGBT, mystery

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Shine by Lauren Myracle (2011)

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Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
Cat's best friend Patrick is in a coma after a horrific beating that is being considered a hate crime (Patrick is gay). In her rural southern town where "there aren't all that many people to choose from when it comes to having friends," everyone tuts over the tragedy but no one seems to be looking too closely into who did it. Cat, feeling guilty over her estrangement from Patrick, decides to go digging. The close-knit atmosphere of a rural town is made real for the reader, but so is its cloistered ways. I didn't expect this to be as much of the mystery it turned out to be but it's also a story of redemption. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
Wow! This book was so well done. The story and character development were amazing and it was so suspenseful. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 22, 2016 |
Shine, a book marketed as an adolescent novel, but which is really only appropriate for readers in the upper age range of that bracket or very mature younger readers, takes on some difficult subjects with candor, sexually explicit scenes, and rather raw language. The novel is told by Cat, a rising senior in a poverty stricken area of the North Carolina mountains. Because of a sexual assault she suffered when she was thirteen she has become socially shut down, closing herself off from all of her former friends and even family. When her former best friend, Patrick, is the victim of a hate crime she once again begins to interact with her community if only to find out who is responsible for Patrick's brutal attack. Along the way she learns much about her family, friends and community and learns to open up again. Patrick, an openly gay teen boy, has faced prejudice and cruelty even from his friend throughout his high school years, and yet, was more or less accepted. His assault shocks the small community while the town's teens seem to be pulling in ranks. Everyone would rather believe that the attack was the work of an outsider. But Cat isn't convinced and begins to investigate.

The book depicts very candidly a atrophied mill town where the mill's closing has led to limited jobs and opportunities, which in turn have lead to rampant hopelessness. Joblessness and despair have lead many of the locals to meth running, cooking and usage. Alcoholism, drug addiction, poverty, ignorance, brutal childhoods, sexual assault, pedophilia and prejudice against homosexuals are all dealt with honestly, and for a young adult novel, with very strong language and descriptive situations. Many of these are also central to the mystery. I live in the area where the book is set, but in one of the affluent towns. The author's depictions is unfortunately very accurate. This is an area where you can go from being among some of the poorest people in North Carolina to being within a fifteen minute drive among some of the richest in the country. The meth problem and its causes are just as the author describes them for economically blighted areas of western North Carolina.

I give the book high marks for honesty and compassion. Also, the mystery is taut, the characters well developed, and the writing better than average for a teen novel. While I have said that the book is really most appropriate for the upper ages of the YA market, the only reason I read the book was because my daughter loved it so much that she begged me to read it. She is 13. I have no problem with her reading a book of this nature; I really feel it had much to offer. However, parents of young teens I would strongly caution to take a look at it if before allowing their child to read it if they are at all hesitant about what their teens read. Shine definitely pushes the boundaries for teen fiction.

I am not much a reader of teen fiction finding it for the most part to be stylistically lacking and shallow. If I where rating this as a teen novel I would give it 4 stars, but as an adult reading it as a novel more appropriate for adults I think it is a 3.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Shine, a book marketed as an adolescent novel, but which is really only appropriate for readers in the upper age range of that bracket or very mature younger readers, takes on some difficult subjects with candor, sexually explicit scenes, and rather raw language. The novel is told by Cat, a rising senior in a poverty stricken area of the North Carolina mountains. Because of a sexual assault she suffered when she was thirteen she has become socially shut down, closing herself off from all of her former friends and even family. When her former best friend, Patrick, is the victim of a hate crime she once again begins to interact with her community if only to find out who is responsible for Patrick's brutal attack. Along the way she learns much about her family, friends and community and learns to open up again. Patrick, an openly gay teen boy, has faced prejudice and cruelty even from his friend throughout his high school years, and yet, was more or less accepted. His assault shocks the small community while the town's teens seem to be pulling in ranks. Everyone would rather believe that the attack was the work of an outsider. But Cat isn't convinced and begins to investigate.

The book depicts very candidly a atrophied mill town where the mill's closing has led to limited jobs and opportunities, which in turn have lead to rampant hopelessness. Joblessness and despair have lead many of the locals to meth running, cooking and usage. Alcoholism, drug addiction, poverty, ignorance, brutal childhoods, sexual assault, pedophilia and prejudice against homosexuals are all dealt with honestly, and for a young adult novel, with very strong language and descriptive situations. Many of these are also central to the mystery. I live in the area where the book is set, but in one of the affluent towns. The author's depictions is unfortunately very accurate. This is an area where you can go from being among some of the poorest people in North Carolina to being within a fifteen minute drive among some of the richest in the country. The meth problem and its causes are just as the author describes them for economically blighted areas of western North Carolina.

I give the book high marks for honesty and compassion. Also, the mystery is taut, the characters well developed, and the writing better than average for a teen novel. While I have said that the book is really most appropriate for the upper ages of the YA market, the only reason I read the book was because my daughter loved it so much that she begged me to read it. She is 13. I have no problem with her reading a book of this nature; I really feel it had much to offer. However, parents of young teens I would strongly caution to take a look at it if before allowing their child to read it if they are at all hesitant about what their teens read. Shine definitely pushes the boundaries for teen fiction.

I am not much a reader of teen fiction finding it for the most part to be stylistically lacking and shallow. If I where rating this as a teen novel I would give it 4 stars, but as an adult reading it as a novel more appropriate for adults I think it is a 3.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Shine, a book marketed as an adolescent novel, but which is really only appropriate for readers in the upper age range of that bracket or very mature younger readers, takes on some difficult subjects with candor, sexually explicit scenes, and rather raw language. The novel is told by Cat, a rising senior in a poverty stricken area of the North Carolina mountains. Because of a sexual assault she suffered when she was thirteen she has become socially shut down, closing herself off from all of her former friends and even family. When her former best friend, Patrick, is the victim of a hate crime she once again begins to interact with her community if only to find out who is responsible for Patrick's brutal attack. Along the way she learns much about her family, friends and community and learns to open up again. Patrick, an openly gay teen boy, has faced prejudice and cruelty even from his friend throughout his high school years, and yet, was more or less accepted. His assault shocks the small community while the town's teens seem to be pulling in ranks. Everyone would rather believe that the attack was the work of an outsider. But Cat isn't convinced and begins to investigate.

The book depicts very candidly a atrophied mill town where the mill's closing has led to limited jobs and opportunities, which in turn have lead to rampant hopelessness. Joblessness and despair have lead many of the locals to meth running, cooking and usage. Alcoholism, drug addiction, poverty, ignorance, brutal childhoods, sexual assault, pedophilia and prejudice against homosexuals are all dealt with honestly, and for a young adult novel, with very strong language and descriptive situations. Many of these are also central to the mystery. I live in the area where the book is set, but in one of the affluent towns. The author's depictions is unfortunately very accurate. This is an area where you can go from being among some of the poorest people in North Carolina to being within a fifteen minute drive among some of the richest in the country. The meth problem and its causes are just as the author describes them for economically blighted areas of western North Carolina.

I give the book high marks for honesty and compassion. Also, the mystery is taut, the characters well developed, and the writing better than average for a teen novel. While I have said that the book is really most appropriate for the upper ages of the YA market, the only reason I read the book was because my daughter loved it so much that she begged me to read it. She is 13. I have no problem with her reading a book of this nature; I really feel it had much to offer. However, parents of young teens I would strongly caution to take a look at it if before allowing their child to read it if they are at all hesitant about what their teens read. Shine definitely pushes the boundaries for teen fiction.

I am not much a reader of teen fiction finding it for the most part to be stylistically lacking and shallow. If I where rating this as a teen novel I would give it 4 stars, but as an adult reading it as a novel more appropriate for adults I think it is a 3.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
This book was - how can I be objective? A miracle. A masterpiece. It got under my skin and dug tunnels into my heart, flooding me with empathy for everyone in this book... I loved the heroine. I loved how she dug her way out of her own pain and saved herself while saving Patrick. I loved that she was naive, and frightened, and emotional, but willing to ask the hard questions and learn the difficult answers anyway. I loved that she doesn't just come out, solve the crime, and retreat back to her world of books - during her investigations, she works to rebuild a lot of burnt bridges, even if it means accepting the flaws in other people....
I put this book down with an ache for a beautiful novel, now finished, knowing I would have read something else, something that would inevitably be different. But one joy remained - the opportunity to write a review of this profound, emotional, heartbreaking, time-devouring novel, and get you all to read it.
A+
 
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Epigraph
"You are the light of this world." - Matthew 5:14
Dedication
To Sarah Mlynowski and Emily Lockhart: Your love is so bright, I have to wear shades.
First words
Bloody Sunday: Teen Brutally Attacked. Stunned residents of Black Creek, North Carolina, pray for seventeen-year-old Patrick Truman, beaten and left for dead outside the convenience store where he works.
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When her best friend falls victim to a vicious hate crime, sixteen-year-old Cat sets out to discover the culprits in her small North Carolina town.

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