HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Lost in Translation by Nicole Mones
Loading...

Lost in Translation

by Nicole Mones

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4711233,419 (3.51)38

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 38 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
I'd like to give this 4 stars but due to the mature themes that may offend some and a couple of unfortunately explicit scenes, I'll stick with 3. Having said that, I do like this author for a lot of reasons. I agree with this quote from the description of the novel:

The key to the novel's success is Mones's in-depth knowledge of China's culture, history, and politics. The question of cultural identity is at the core of her tale, and she skillfully weaves various aspects of Chinese life--from ancestor worship to the Cultural Revolution--into the personal relationships of her characters. By novel's end, readers have discovered a great deal about archeology, China, and most especially about the unmapped territories of memory, desire, and identity. ( )
  tkcs | Feb 23, 2019 |
(I have no notes on this book ... but I've since read another book by this author, and really like her work) ( )
  BookConcierge | Feb 8, 2016 |
A slowly unfolding, low key story with parallel tales of lost things, including the Chinese wife of an archaeologist who is taken away by the NLA to a work camp for verboten information she included in an academic paper, the lost normalcy of an American woman's life after her father's outspoken views causes a murderous riot in her name, and the lost Peking man. I liked the story, and the setting, but the characters were unsympathetic and not fleshed out enough to appreciate them. Overall a good read though, if you are interested in Chinese customs and language. ( )
  kimberwolf | Jan 16, 2016 |
I had a really hard time starting this book. I waas finally able to take interest in a bit of the story and finish the book. I didn't have any sympathy for the main character. It seemed like she was being indulgent and irresponsible. The serch for Peking Man, which is the premise for the book parallel's the main character's life in her search for a feeling of love that is older than Peking Man. ifyou want to learn a bit about Chinese culture, this book is probably an easy and entertaining way to do that.I was interested in the descriptions of the villages and their amenities, or lack of them. The Chaos was also touched upon from a personal point of view and I found it interesting to read about. ( )
  jlapac | Aug 14, 2013 |
Lost in Translation is a novel about love--between a nation and its past, between a man and a memory, between a father and a daughter. ( )
  velvetink | Mar 31, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
from the author's website: When Alice Mannegan receives a phone call from an American archeologist seeking a translator, what begins as a trek into the remote deserts of northwest China in search of archeological treasure turns into a journey of the heart. Suspecting that famed archeologist and Jesuit priest/theologian Teilhard de Chardin may have hidden the bones of Peking Man in China's far northwest during the Second World War, Alice and her companions search for the bones by following clues left in his letters, in the process unraveling the story of his conflicted 23-year relationship with an American divorcee, Lucile Swan. As the China around them struggles to reconcile its own past and present, Alice must come to terms both with her racist father back home and with the slow, surprising love now growing between her and Chinese scientist Lin Shiyang.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0385319444, Paperback)

Nicole Mones doesn't waste any time getting to the heart of the matter in her first novel, Lost in Translation. Within the first 10 pages we discover that protagonist Alice Mannegan, an interpreter based in Beijing, has a yen for sex with Chinese men. By the time we reach page 20, we've learned that Alice is in full flight from her father, a racist U.S. congressman, and about to start working for Adam Spencer, an American archeologist on the hunt for the missing bones of one of the century's biggest scientific finds: Peking man. Having set the stage, Mones steps back and lets her characters do the work as she proceeds to spin a tale that is part mystery, part love story, and part cultural exchange. Alice and Spencer travel to a remote region of China, accompanied by Dr. Lin Shiyang, with whom Alice falls in love. Mones spends a fair amount of time on the team's search for the bones, whose mysterious disappearance during the Second World War has never been explained, but her main focus is less on finding Peking man than on exposing the skeletons in her main characters' closets. As Alice, Spencer, and Dr. Lin move forward in their quest, they are forced to reckon with their pasts. Each, it seems, has an ulterior reason for being where they are and doing what they do, and it is in the subtle play of personalities, motivations, and misunderstandings that Lost in Translation finds its rhythm.

The key to the novel's success is Mones's in-depth knowledge of China's culture, history, and politics. The question of cultural identity is at the core of her tale, and she skillfully weaves various aspects of Chinese life--from ancestor worship to the Cultural Revolution--into the personal relationships of her characters. By novel's end, readers have discovered a great deal about archeology, China, and most especially about the unmapped territories of memory, desire, and identity. Lost in Translation is a fine first novel, the first salvo of a promising literary career.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:00 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

At dawn in Beijing, Alice Mannegan pedals a bicycle through the deserted streets. An American by birth, a translator by profession, she spends her nights in Beijing's smoke-filled bars and the Chinese men she so desires never misunderstand her intentions. All around her rushes the air of China, the scent of history and change, of a world where she has come to escape her father's love and her own pain. Hired by an archaeologist searching for the bones of Peking Man, Alice joins an expedition that penetrates a vast, uncharted land and brings Professor Lin Shiyang into her life. As they draw closer to unearthing the secret of Peking Man, as the group's every move is followed, their every whisper recorded, Alice and Lin find shelter in each other, slowly putting to rest the ghosts of their pasts.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.51)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 7
2.5 1
3 27
3.5 10
4 18
4.5 4
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,379,899 books! | Top bar: Always visible