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Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III…
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Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III (edition 2006)

by Flora Fraser

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Member:damsel58
Title:Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III
Authors:Flora Fraser
Info:Anchor (2006), Paperback, 496 pages
Collections:To read
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Princesses: The Six Daughters of George III by Flora Fraser

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This book, while it concentrates on the lives of the six daughters of King George III of England, does take in quite a bit of King George and his consort Queen Charlotte, as well as the princesses' brothers, including the future George IV. One problem, which Fraser largely battles successfully, is keeping the massive cast straight, inclusive of the fact that many personages have the same or similar names. The family tree in the front of the book certainly gets a workout! The biggest problem is that Fraser isn't really able to make the princesses interesting; you get the strong impression from the book that they led crashingly dull lives. Most of the drama seems to have come from various illnesses that they suffered, mixed here and there with largely failed romantic efforts. Fraser thus seems to have put an enormous amount of effort into a work that, in the final analysis, doesn't really shed a great deal of light, save for some of the dysfunctions of the Hanoverian royal family. Worth it if you're a fan of the royal family; not so much if you're not. ( )
  EricCostello | Dec 1, 2017 |
A wonderful biography of King George III's many daughters. This book takes a look at the lives of a most unfortunate group of princesses. The ladies were subject to their parents' moods and fancies. Their father seemed to never want them to marry, and their mother was happy to have them near her. As they grew older, some of them acted out, causing scandal. Indeed, there were rumors of illegitimate children, lovers, and secret marriages.

The book delves into the relationships that the princesses had with many of their relations, including their numerous nieces and nephews. Among the most talked about are Princess Charlotte of Wales and the future Queen Victoria. The sisters looked on their siblings' progeny as the children that life denied them.

A fascinating look at Georgian life and a wonderful biography of these six women. ( )
  briandrewz | Mar 28, 2016 |
The “madness of King George” has been fodder for plays, movies and numerous books, but the fate of his fifteen children is rarely discussed. FIFTEEN children. This is a well-written, well-documented examination of the lives of the king’s six daughters, none of whom were allowed to marry during his lifetime. As a result, they remained cloistered in their palaces until their forties, at which point he died and they married left, right and center. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
Ho hum...... on & on & on & on about everything surrounding the Princesses in minute detail. So much so, I gave up, because I don't care that one of the Nannies was a drunk, they really were not allowed to eat much meat, the King's brother married a Whig "Commoner"..... Needless to say I was very put off.

Also the writing style and tone was as if the author was writing back in the 18th Century, very affected.

I wanted to know about them, and I just didn't have the patience to wade through the history of George III, his family, England & the poorly behaved Colonies.

What I did find interesting was that George III & wife were very family oriented & preferred to spend much time w/ their children rather than court.

The book would have been better had she followed the writing style of: "Victoria's Daughters" by Jerrod Packard. ( )
  Auntie-Nanuuq | Jan 18, 2016 |
3.5 stars. A good history, and the scenes dealing with George III's final descent into madness are riveting. But there are too many unimportant details (governess taking her daughter to a spa for the cure) and too few important ones (Princess Sophia's pregnancy and reactions from those around her, including her parents, are almost entirely left out). While I have a feel for the six princesses and their personalities, I'm left wanting a good biography of them. ( )
  GunnarGrey | Aug 5, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679451188, Hardcover)

From acclaimed biographer Flora Fraser, a brilliant group biography of the six daughters of “Mad” King George III.
Fraser takes us into the heart of the British royal family during the tumultuous period of the American and French revolutions and beyond, illuminating the complicated lives of these exceptional women: Princess Royal, the eldest, constantly at odds with her mother; home-loving, family-minded Augusta; plump Elizabeth, a gifted amateur artist; Mary, the bland beauty of the family; Sophia, emotional and prone to take refuge in illness; and Amelia, “the most turbulent and tempestuous of all the Princesses.” Weaving together letters and historical accounts, Fraser re-creates their world in all its frustrations and excitements.

The six sisters, though handsome, accomplished and extremely well educated, were kept from marrying by George III, and Fraser describes how they remained subject to their father for many years, while he teetered on the brink of mental collapse. The King may have believed that his six daughters were happy to live celibately at Windsor, but secretly, as Fraser’s absorbing narrative of royal repression and sexual license shows, the sisters enjoyed startling freedom. Several of them, torn between love for their ailing father and longing for independence, forged their own scandalous and subversive lives within the castle walls. With a discerning eye for psychological detail and a keen feminist sensibility, Fraser delves into these clandestine love affairs, revealing the truth about Sophia’s illegitimate baby; examining Amelia's intimate correspondence with her soldier-lover; and investigating the eventual marriages of Princesses Royal, Elizabeth and Mary.

Never before has the historical searchlight been turned with such sympathy and acuity on George III and his family. With unparalleled access to royal and private family papers, Flora Fraser has created a revelatory portrait of six fascinating women and their place in history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:44 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Drawing on their extraordinary private correspondence, acclaimed biographer Flora Fraser gives voice to the daughters of 'Mad' King George III. Six handsome, accomplished, extremely well-educated women: Princess Royal, the eldest, constantly at odds with her mother; home-loving, family-minded Augusta; plump Elizabeth, a gifted amateur artist; Mary the bland beauty of the family; Sophia, emotional and prone to take refuge in illness; and Amelia, 'the most turbulent and tempestuous of all the princesses.' In this sumptuous group portrait, Fraser takes us into the heart of the British Royal family during the tumultuous period of the American and French revolutions. Never before has the historical searchlight been turned with such sympathy and acuity on George III and his family.

» see all 4 descriptions

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