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Shipwrecks, Monsters, and Mysteries of the Great Lakes (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Ed Butts

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3312338,203 (3.79)1
Member:yapete
Title:Shipwrecks, Monsters, and Mysteries of the Great Lakes
Authors:Ed Butts
Info:Tundra Books (2011), Edition: Original, Paperback, 88 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Great Lakes, Stories

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Shipwrecks, Monsters, and Mysteries of the Great Lakes by Ed Butts (2011)

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This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I chose this book because I once wrote an essay on peace time sea disasters years ago when I was in school. Research in the library could be an arduous and time consuming task. I wish this little book had been available then! I enjoyed the book very much. ( )
1 vote charlottem | Feb 18, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I enjoyed the diversity of the author's choices: elegant party boats, commercial ships, and impressive prison ships (which I didn't know existed!). Butts has a vivid style which makes these old wrecks come to life and has the courtesy of not boring the reader with technical details (amateurs may be disappointed). This book has a clever way of disguising historical fact (I learned a lot about the region in which I live!) and human drama. I would have liked to see some tourist information: what a great way to discover some of these regions and to know a bit more about the archeological facts - an annex or footnotes would have been appropriate. I didn't miss those too much, however, taking this book as an unpretentious but knowledgeable introduction of navigation in the Great Lakes.
Of least interest to me were the monsters; hear-say and impressions are not much to sink one's teeth into, but it does generate curiosity. I'll be on the lookout for Bessie. ( )
  Cecilturtle | Feb 18, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A great little book to introduce people to some of the crashes and lore of the Great Lakes. I do wish that map(s) had been included for those who are not familiar with the geography of the lakes. The tales were covered briefly but well, with enough depth to spark interest in further research. I think it is engaging for both YA readers and adults alike. It is a little book, but a great introduction to the myths and shipwrecks of the area. I also appreciated that a selection of wrecks over a span of time were selected rather than just ones from one era. It gives a sense of the ongoing issues surrounding the stormy hazards of the lakes. ( )
1 vote evedeve | Feb 16, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Shipwrecks, Monsters and Mysteries of the Great Lakes is one of those works of nonfiction with a narrative style that will please even a devoted young fiction reader. It manages to convey a sense of how very immense the great lakes must while at the same time presenting a cross-section of North American history from the treatment of Native Americans, to the treatment of Australian convicts. My only complaint about the book was the lack of cations in the photos that head each chapter, particularly the clean, crisp image that accompanies the tale of the wreck of the 'Speedy' in 1804. However, this is a minor complaint and I doubt that the young reader will notice it. After I finished reading the book I let my 9-year old son, an avid reader who hates nonfiction, read it and he actually liked it a lot so that makes two thumbs up. I'd recommend it for for advanced elementary and middle school readers.
2 vote yolana | Feb 11, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A great starting book for kids who are intersted in doing research on the Great Lakes. Having grown up in Green Bay, WI, and 15 minutes from Lake Michigan, I have heard many of these legends and stories. This book covers many of the big shipwrecks and ghost maritime ghost stories of the Lakes. Alot of time the history of the Great Lakes is overlooked and it is a shame because it is very interesting. Mr. Butts provides small snippets of 10 Great Lake legends; enough to peak the interest of young readers. I will be letting my fellow Great Lake enthusiasts, especially those who are teachers, know about this great addition to their libraries. By the way, great cover art!! ( )
1 vote bnbookgirl | Feb 9, 2011 |
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For Kyle Howell of Cape Breton; my cousin and a true authority on the Edmund Fitzgerald
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Book description
In 1679, a French ship called the Griffon left Green Bay on Lake Michigan, bound for Niagara with a cargo of furs. Neither the Griffon nor the five-man crew was ever seen again. Though the Griffon’s fate remains a mystery, its disappearance was probably the result of the first shipwreck on a Great Lake.

Since then, more than six thousand vessels, large and small, have met tragic ends on the Great Lakes. For many years, saltwater mariners scoffed at the freshwater sailors of the Great Lakes, “puddles” compared to the vast oceans. But those who actually worked on the Great Lakes ships knew differently.

Shoals and reefs, uncharted rocks, and sandbars could snare a ship or rip open a hull. Unpredictable winds could capsize a vessel at any moment. A ship caught in a storm had much less room to maneuver than did one at sea. The wreckage of ships and the bones of the people who sail them litter the bottoms of the five lakes: Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior. Ed Butts has gathered stories and lake lore in this fascinating, frightening volume. For anyone living on the shores of the Great Lakes, these tales will inspire a new interest and respect for their storied past.
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Traces the history of shipwrecks on the Great Lakes and the various myths and legends attributed to specific tragedies, revealing the violent conditions that have wrecked thousands of vessels since 1679, along with monster sightings in Lakes Ontario and Erie. Traces the history of shipwrecks on the Great Lakes and the myths and legends attributed to specific tragedies, revealing the conditions that have wrecked thousands of vessels since 1679, along with monster sightings in Lakes Ontario and Erie.… (more)

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Tundra Books

An edition of this book was published by Tundra Books.

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