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The Twelve (Book Two of The Passage Trilogy): A Novel (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Justin Cronin

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2,0301053,296 (3.86)154
Member:mjscott
Title:The Twelve (Book Two of The Passage Trilogy): A Novel
Authors:Justin Cronin
Info:Ballantine Books (2012), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 592 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:Back Stories, Work Camp in Iowa, Horror, Thriller, 2012

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The Twelve by Justin Cronin (2012)

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English (102)  German (2)  French (1)  All (105)
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It's so funny; when I found the first book in this series, I'd not heard of Justin Cronin nor The Passage Trilogy. I actually got the book from Dollar Tree (everybody knows Dollar Tree!) So with my book that cost me one buck, I happened to see, about three weeks later, that there was a third book being released. I was panicked- I had a book that belonged in a series and I didn't know the title of book two! So I set out and purchased book two (Cost me $20!) and signed up to possibly win book three. Well guess what...

I lucked out and ended up with all three, paying a whopping $22 for three huge novels, and let me tell you: They're amazing. Justin Cronin is amazing. You should have these books in your library!

​ All three of these books are one enormous story that spans well over a millennia. The world has fallen and its only hope to carry on any semblance of humanity stems from a single girl. Amy Harper Bellafonte Book 2: The Twelve, has an epic beginning, sounding off the previous book's events like the Book of Genesis. It then dove into filler stories that told you what happened with folks in The Time Before. You find out the details on Deputy Director Horace Guilder- Walgast's boss. You even find out what happened to Lila, Walgast's wife. There are a ton of new folks to add to the list, including Zero's familiar, Grey ( the pedophile). Anyway, the story gives great backstories and tidbits here and there. The story, for me, is epic, though very dark and saddening. There's nothing but suffering, torture and death throughout the book. Gory and sickening too; it was all right up my alley when it comes to such a tale!

http://bit.ly/ThePassagebyJustinCronin
The Passage Trilogy
Justin Cronin
Ballantine Books & Wheeler Publishing
Nov. 1, 2012 ( )
  AReneeHunt | Jan 2, 2017 |
  This review is written with a GPL 3.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at Bookstooge.booklikes.blogspot.wordpress.leafmarks.com by express permission of this reviewer.   Title: The Twelve Series: The Passage Author: Justin Cronin Rating: 3 of 5 Stars Genre: Urban Fantasy   Synopsis: The post-apocalyptic world continues, as well as stories about the fall. All of the Twelve, along with Amy, meet up for the next step in their growth. Only this has been planned for and the rebellion takes advantage of it. Which leaves only Amy and Zero as representatives of the Vampire race.   My Thoughts: I enjoyed this a bit more than The Passage, as I didn't find the middle half boring, but I was very frustrated with Cronin's introducing large groups of characters only to throw them away a chapter later, or to write 5 chapters about them and only  make it tangentially related. Lots and lots of little side rabbit trails.   The pseudo-religiosity also got on my nerves as well. It was forced and even more damning, it FELT forced.   And like I had written in my update, I kept getting this mixed up with del Toro and Hogan's The Strain trilogy. I mean, how different can "vampires because of some plague-type thing" be anyway? It is all the same in my mind.   I'll finish the next book, but if this goes on longer than a 3rd book, then I'll be done. This just confirms that while I loved Dracula, vampires do something to authors that make their books unpalatable to me. " ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
Totally immersed in the world of The Twelve and in tears by the end. Well structured, with good characters, action sequences, a few ridiculous coincidences (but you want those so you don't care a whit). Delicious, and I don't just mean the blood. ( )
  jjaylynny | Nov 12, 2016 |

Originally posted here

This is the middle book in The Passage trilogy and I have to admit, The Twelve lacks the same magic that was abundant in The Passage.

The book started tantalisingly, the reader is given a short summary of the events of the first book in the form of a future document called The Book of Twelves, then there is a short chapter set five years onward from events from the last book which focuses on some of the fates of the main characters. But then, too suddenly the narrative switches to a new group of characters back at the beginning of the outbreak, year zero; before going back to the storyline five years onward from the last book. Don't get me wrong I liked the time jump, it was all very interesting, it was the last third of the book that seemed a little messy.

I was left feeling confused and unsure of what was happening at points as the narrative becomes super weird with an over saturation of character transformations with dream sequences. I'm thinking particularly of Amy here. I have no idea what on earth is going on with Amy or Alicia for that matter.

The dystopian Homeland was really well done and despite all of the gory violence I really enjoyed that part particularly. The Twelve perplex me though, as does Zero. I still do not fully understand what their significance is. It gets a little too 'weird fiction' for my tastes in parts.

There were characters that I just did not remember and had to backtrack through The Passage to remind myself. Bearing in mind I read them back to back, I can't imagine how hazy details must have been for readers who had a longer gap. I think Cronin could have helped this by weaving in slight refresher sentences about the secondary characters here and there like other authors have done in other series that I have read.

So in short, this book barely made it to a 3 star rating, it was convoluted and quite bizarre in parts. I will still read the next book, City of Mirrors but I need a break for now. ( )
  4everfanatical | Oct 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 102 (next | show all)
For the early years of his career as a writer, Justin Cronin won awards and got teaching posts for the sort of book that is described as sensitive and evocative; then he decided to do something else, but to do it with the same seriousness and competence. The first novel of his vampire trilogy, The Passage, was a canny combination of disparate elements – he had learned from Stephen King how to tear the world apart and set monsters loose in it, and from Tolkien how to set a new innocent generation on a quest for the cure to the world's pain. What is impressive about that book, and now its sequel The Twelve, is that there is nothing contemptuous about Cronin's approach; this is a formal exercise based on study and thought, but it has also a serious commitment to the virtues he has found in genre fiction – well-paced flurries of action and a deepened portrayal of the conventional emotions that too often become clichés.
 
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Epigraph
She stood beside me for years, or was it a moment? I cannot remember. Maybe I loved her, maybe I didn’t. There was a house, and then no house. There were trees, but none remain. When no one remembers, what is there? You, whose moments are gone, who drift like smoke in the afterlife, tell me something, tell me anything. - Mark Strand, "In the Afterlife"
Dedication
For Leslie, foot-to-foot
First words
For it came to pass that the world had grown wicked, and men had taken war into their hearts, and committed great defilements upon every living thing, so that the world was a dream of death;
Quotations
Watch the clock. Know the location of the nearest hardbox.  When in doubt, run.
Hence the major problem with immortality, apart from the peculiar diet: everything began to bore you.
Give people hope, and you could make them do just about anything. And not just your average, everyday kind of hope--for food or clothes or the absence of pain or good suburban schools or low down payments with easy financing. What people needed was a hope beyond the visible world, the world of the body and its trials, of life's endless dull parade of things. A hope that all was not as it appeared.
They became their enemy, as all must do; they ceased to be slaves, and so became alive.
"Because that's what heaven is," said Amy. "It's opening the door of a house in twilight and everyone you love is there."
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Survivors of a government-induced apocalypse endure their violent and disease-stricken world while protecting their loved ones; while a century into the future, members of a transformed society determinedly search for the original twelve virals.

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