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Moon Over Soho (Rivers of London 2) by Ben…
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Moon Over Soho (Rivers of London 2) (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Ben Aaronovitch

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1,371885,586 (4.01)231
Member:AdonisGuilfoyle
Title:Moon Over Soho (Rivers of London 2)
Authors:Ben Aaronovitch
Info:Gollancz (2011), Edition: Mass Market Paperback, Paperback, 384 pages
Collections:Your library, Read in 2012 (inactive)
Rating:****
Tags:Kindle, 2012

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Moon Over Soho by Ben Aaronovitch (2011)

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» See also 231 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
You can read about my thoughts about this book here:
http://storytimewithbuffy.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/moon-over-soho/ ( )
  BuffyBarber | Jun 5, 2016 |
READ IN ENGLISH

I had really enjoyed reading the first book of this series, Rivers of London (also known as Midnight Riot), so I was obviously also very curious to this second book, Moon over Soho.

Unfortunately I didn't like it as much as I liked the first book. Perhaps it was because I don't know enough about Jazz to understand properly what they were talking about, perhaps I wasn't completely charmed with the Riversex (and the ongoing quarreling between the different Rivers). It was still an enjoyable read, and I'm planning on reading the third book anytime soon... ( )
  Floratina | May 26, 2016 |
Now that A Room Full of Elephants is out, I'm planning to read more. Top of the pile: Moon Over Soho, the second book in the Peter Grant/Rivers of London series by Ben Aaronovitch. If you remember, I enjoyed the first tremendously.

Although not a sequel, Moon dovetails nicely with the end of the first book. Rivers had consequences, and they're not funnelled into the Thames to dilute to nothing. Rather, they form an underlying thread at which Aaronovitch occasionally tugs, with the promise of more in subsequent books. I'm glad he didn't wave the big red magical-realism reset wand: I'm now two books into a series, and I'm certainly here for the duration. (The third book's already lower down the pile.)

Where Moon isn't quite as successful, for me, is in the main plot. It feels a little disjointed, less coherent, than Rivers. Some of the plot developments aren't as surprising as it appears they're supposed to be. Without spoiling anything, our protagonist displays a certain... lack of due diligence in one particular area. I know from experience that it's tricky to keep revelations revelatory: as the author, you know whose fingers are in which pies and it's often hard to judge the correct balance between sprinkling a few crumbs and chucking buckets of pastry at the reader. Here it doesn't distract greatly from the fun of the book, merely triggering the occasional arctic eye-roll. (I'm sorry.)

One criticism I've heard – entirely fairly – about my own Till Undeath Do Us Part regards its detailed geographical references: the "he turned left onto King's Parade and waved at Charlie the bin-busker" sort of thing. Moon has these too. Not everyone likes them but I think they're fine here: London's a minor character, and the details help ground the reader in reality as a counterpoint to the magic. Knowing the locations – through personal experience or by reputation – heightens the fantastical elements.

I do like how Moon ends: both the end of the plot, and the winding up that takes place in the closing pages. Full of bittery sweetness, regrets and promise. The spark of magic glinting at the edges of the grey hardness of police life.

Overall: not quite as enjoyable as Rivers, but a solid, fun read that sets things up nicely for book three. ( )
  anthonycamber | Apr 23, 2016 |
This is the second of this smart series about magic and murder in London that I have read. I think the writing is even better than the first one. Of course "Magic and murder to a jazz beat" (from the note on the front) is sure to be right up my alley.

Peter Grant is a constable with the Metropolitan Police Force who also happens to be an apprentice wizard. His teacher in the wizard arts, Nightingale, was badly injured in the last book as was his partner, Leslie, so Peter is pretty much on his own when the police pathologist calls him in on the suspicious death of a saxophone player. It is suspicious because both Peter and the pathologist can pick up a saxophone rendition of Body and Soul from the dead sax player. These vestigia are a sure sign of magical intervention. Soon other jazz players are dropping dead. Peter has also been asked to consult on a murder that appears to have been caused by a man's penis being bitten off by a vagina denticata (i.e. a vagina with teeth). The two matters don't seem to have anything in common but any reader of murder mysteries knows there is going to be a time when the two cases are combined.

There are lots of delicious details about jazz in London throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Plus, Aaronovitch displays that British wit to great advantage. One example from near the end of the book when Peter and Nightingale have survived a magical attack:
"For a terrifying moment I thought he was going to hug me, but fortunately we both remembered we were English just in time. Still, it was a close call."

This isn't one of those series you can read out of order so if you haven't read Midnight Riot yet put down this book and get it. ( )
  gypsysmom | Apr 16, 2016 |
Peter Grant was on track to becoming a paper-pushing policeman when he stumbled upon magic. Now he's apprenticed to the last magician left on the London police force, and he's got more excitement than he can handle. He dealt with a marauding spirit and the gods of the Thames in [b:Midnight Riot|8680417|Midnight Riot (Peter Grant, #1)|Ben Aaronovitch|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1320484733s/8680417.jpg|13552476], and now Peter is tracking down whoever--or whatever--is killing jazz musicians. Like the last book, this is witty and fast paced, with great action scenes and wonderfully consistent (but multifaceted) characterization. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ben Aaronovitchprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Holdbrook-Smith, KobnaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walter, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
'Men have died for this music.

You can't get more serious than that'

Dizzy Gillespie
Dedication
For Karifa, because every father yearns to be a hero for his son.
First words
It's a sad fact of modern life that if you drive long enough, sooner or later you must leave London behind.
Quotations
“Would you like me to arrest you?” I asked. That’s an old police trick, if you warn people they often just ignore you but ask them a question – then they have to think. Once they start to think about the consequences they almost always calm down, unless their drunk of course, or stoned, or aged between fourteen and twenty-one, or Glaswegian.
She opened her eyes. They were still blue. They were still Leslie's eyes. I tried to stay focused on those eyes.
"What do you think?" she said.
"I've seen worse," I said.
"Liar," she said. "Like who?"
"Your dad," I said.
It wasn't funny but I could see she appreciated the effort.
"Do you think you'll get used to it?"
"Get used to what?"
"My face," she said.
"You're always talking about your face, you know," I said. "You're just too vain. You need to think about other people instead of yourself all the time."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345524594, Mass Market Paperback)

BODY AND SOUL
 
The song. That’s what London constable and sorcerer’s apprentice Peter Grant first notices when he examines the corpse of Cyrus Wilkins, part-time jazz drummer and full-time accountant, who dropped dead of a heart attack while playing a gig at Soho’s 606 Club. The notes of the old jazz standard are rising from the body—a sure sign that something about the man’s death was not at all natural but instead supernatural.

Body and soul—they’re also what Peter will risk as he investigates a pattern of similar deaths in and around Soho. With the help of his superior officer, Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale, the last registered wizard in England, and the assistance of beautiful jazz aficionado Simone Fitzwilliam, Peter will uncover a deadly magical menace—one that leads right to his own doorstep and to the squandered promise of a young jazz musician: a talented trumpet player named Richard “Lord” Grant—otherwise known as Peter’s dear old dad.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Rookie cop and magical apprentice Peter Grant from Midnight Riot returns inthis urban fantasy tale of magic and murder, set to a jazz beat.

(summary from another edition)

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