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The Profession: A Thriller by Steven…
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The Profession: A Thriller (2011)

by Steven Pressfield

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Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
Didn't like this one at all. More time was spent describing weapons than the people who used them; in other words, very little character development.

On the up side, it did provide food for thought on tribalism and messianic leadership. But still, a disappointing read. If not for a book club, I would not have finished it. ( )
  LynnB | Oct 29, 2015 |
After reading several of Steven Pressfield's impressive historical novels, namely Gates of Fire, Killing Rommel, and (to a lesser extent) The Afghan Campaign, I was really looking forward to seeing how he'd handle a story set not in the past but rather the near future. I have to say, I was pretty disappointed. The basic premise was interesting enough, but Pressfield didn't manage to make it sustain a compelling story, mainly because its characters were the least engaging that Pressfield has ever written. The less palatable elements felt more gratuitous, and the ultimate effect was much less meaningful. The Profession shares a fatalism with The Afghan Campaign that makes them both less satisfying than Gates of Fire or Killing Rommel. I'd recommend reading those instead.

http://www.amazon.com/review/R1R2T2G1TVA0AO ( )
  AshRyan | Dec 22, 2014 |
2032 and mercenary armies maintain corportate control of Middle Easter noilfields. The biggest mercenary of them all, disgraced USMC General James Salter, seizes the historical moment to make himself King of America, despite the help and at the very end the enmity of Colonel Gent something-or-other, the protagonist who really should have been an NCO.

A cut above the normal military thriller, the literary aspirations don't always make for fun reading. Characterization and sense of place is good throughout. ( )
  steve.clason | Nov 10, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I liked this book and could not put it down. Imagine a few years from now when mercenary soldiers are unified behind one charismatic leader who positions himself as the savior or the world, or more particularly, the Untied States. "In the end the American Dream boils down to what? "I'm getting mine and the hell with you."" Perhaps not a completely realistic story, but certainly possible. Pressfield has written other good books, such as The Legend of Bagger Vance and I include The Profession as one of his good ones. ( )
  cmparkhurst | May 20, 2013 |
I enjoyed this book. It was a nail-biter from start to finish. I love thrillers and this is a great one. Another great thriller I recently read is called, "The Sacred Impostor" by author J. R. Lankford. This a fiction thriller that is not Christian, but focuses more on religion when an infant is born with a divine nature like that of Jesus. From the penthouses and ethnic hubbub of New York, to the grand casas and poverty of Mexico City, from the Vatican to the altars of the Virgin of Guadalupe, a thrilling battle ensues over the second infant whose genes may be divine. Culture, history and issues blend in this passionate, sizzling plot as THE SACRED IMPOSTOR* explores human smuggling and the reasons for it, the ancient healing art of curanderismo, Mexican politics, the Virgin of Guadalupe tradition, and unfolds the mystical story of how the world reacts to rumors of a second Jesus clone. http://www.jrlankford.com/ ( )
  Robyn26 | Nov 11, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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In a near-future world in which governments and corporations are forced to hire cutting-edge mercenary armies to protect their wealth, the globe's largest private military launches a campaign to take over the United States.

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