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Forgotten Waltz by Anne Enright
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Forgotten Waltz (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Anne Enright

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5834116,933 (3.4)1 / 138
Member:PamDon
Title:Forgotten Waltz
Authors:Anne Enright
Info:Jonathan Cape (2011), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:2012

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The Forgotten Waltz by Anne Enright (2011)

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English (40)  Dutch (1)  All languages (41)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Narrated by the "other woman" in a marital triangle, this story was honest and rough-textured, and felt like trying on a scratchy wool dress over naked skin, uncomfortable, as you tug and twist it, deciding you might like it with the right undergarments. Nattily constructed with perfectly fitting iconic pop romantic songs for chapter titles, it is infused with the balloon-pricking disillusionment of such a relationship. ( )
  andreasaria | Jan 24, 2016 |
First person narrative. Booker prize likes that. Female voice. Story of an affair. I liked the book quite a lot. It rambles, not plot driven. But that is probably the story of most affairs. Gets at the issues. Doesn't overplay. A fine book. (Wanted a 3.5.) ( )
  idiotgirl | Dec 25, 2015 |
Anne Enright is always thought provoking, and her prose sparkles like no other contemporary writer. I've read most of her novels and short fiction. The Forgotten Waltz takes a common subject, adultery, and makes it something fresh and particular. Enright takes the reader to the heart of such an affair with all of its emotional turbulence. ( )
  lilyionamackenzie | Jul 25, 2015 |
If likable characters are one of your criteria for a good book, then this one isn't it.
There are some interesting things about the book: It is a first person narrative by Gina Moynahan, a 32 year old, childless, married woman who embarks on an affair with a married man who does have a child....a rather special child, Evie.
The narrative is rambling, contradictory, and doubles back on itself as you hear Gina's side of a story complete with her perceptions and judgments of other people and their motives. These perceptions and judgements change like quicksilver, sometimes within the same sentence.
At times, the narrative is like overhearing one side of a conversation in a coffee shop, or a cellphone conversation of a woman whose time would be better spent on a therapist's couch. Gina is shallow, self-centered, has few scruples, and is motivated by the trappings that money can buy.
The setting is Dublin during the boom time of the early 2000's, heading into the crash of 2008. So money and housing are very important to the story...as are booze, cigarettes, and lust.
And the one thing...actually person...that Gina's story hinges upon is dealt with very peripherally at the beginning and end of her story. And that is Evie, the daughter of Gina's lover, Sean. But this is characteristic of the way Gina deals with life.

The writing is very well done, even if the story is a bit worn and without much plot. Because of the economic boom and bust theme of the book, I can't help wonder if this is a bit of allegorical tale of Ireland. ( )
1 vote tangledthread | May 16, 2015 |
man, rating this book is making me sad. i wanted to love this novel so much, and i just didn't. i loved a few sentences, enjoyed song titles as chapter titles, and do think enright is a wonderful writer, but this just didn't come together for me very well. i seem to be having this run of reads lately where the reader is kept at a distance, and the issues are dealt with in what feels like only a very surface manner. perhaps it's the limited perspective of narration? but when themes are so personal - marriage, parenting, adultery, for example - i really hope to have emotional connections with the prose. (and i am not saying my connections have to be positive. i love unreliable narrators, and unlikeable characters.) i also feel like there were opportunities for some tighter editing. the story felt sloppy at moments, and the flow was not great. i mean, that could be purposeful - these are some messy, careless people. i just wish we got into their messes a bit more. ( )
  Booktrovert | Dec 5, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Enright’s channeling of Gina’s interior monologue is so accurate and unsparing that reading her book is, at times, like eavesdropping on a very long, crazily intimate cellphone conversation.
 
added by chazzard | editThe Guardian, Hermione Lee (Apr 30, 2011)
 
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If it hadn't been for the child then none of this might have happened, but the fact that a child was involved made everything that much harder to forgive.
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During a snowstorm, Gina Moynihan reminisces the string of events that brought her the love of her life, Sean Vallely, and recalls their affair.

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