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When I Am Playing with My Cat, How Do I Know…
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When I Am Playing with My Cat, How Do I Know That She Is Not Playing with… (2011)

by Saul Frampton (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1133106,831 (3.79)3
Recently added byJSMill, private library, CurrerBell, Bart.Claes, vrullan, brainx, PaulDalton
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This book presents Montaigne the man, his works (the Essays, and Travels), his philosophy, his life, and how all of these fit into 16th century French history and culture. It is delightful, thoughtful reading. I recommend it. ( )
  baobab | Dec 9, 2013 |
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Frampton, SaulAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sietsma, JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375424717, Hardcover)

“When I dance, I dance; when I sleep, I sleep. And when I
am walking alone in a beautiful orchard, if my thoughts
are sometimes preoccupied elsewhere, the rest of the time I
bring them back to the walk, to the orchard, to the sweetness
of this solitude, and to me.”
Montaigne
 
In the year 1570, at the age of thirty-seven, Michel de Montaigne gave up his job as a magistrate and retired to his château to brood on his own private grief—the deaths of his best friend, his father, his brother, and his firstborn child. On the ceiling of his library he inscribed a phrase from the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius: “There is no new pleasure to be gained by living longer.”
 
But finding his mind agitated rather than settled by this idleness, Montaigne began to write, giving birth to the Essays—short prose explorations of an amazingly wide range of subjects. And gradually, over the course of his writing, Montaigne rejected his stoical pessimism and turned from a philosophy of death to a philosophy of life. He erased Lucretius’s melancholy fatalism and began to embrace the exuberant vitality of living, finding an antidote to death in the most unlikely places—the touch of a hand, the smell of his doublet, the playfulness of his cat, and the flavor of his wine.
 
Saul Frampton offers a celebration of perhaps the most enjoyable and yet profound of all Renaissance writers, whose essays went on to have a huge impact on figures as diverse as Shakespeare, Emerson, and Orson Welles, and whose thoughts, even today, offer a guide and unprecedented insight into the simple matter of being alive.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:24:35 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Saul Frampton offers a celebration of perhaps the most enjoyable and yet profound of all Renaissance writers, Michel de Montaigne, whose essays went on to have a huge impact on figures as diverse as Shakespeare, Emerson, and Orson Welles, and whose thoughts, even today, offer a guide and unprecedented insight into the simple matter of being alive.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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