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Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth by Jay…
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Evolution: The Story of Life on Earth (2011)

by Jay Hosler, Kevin Cannon (Illustrator), Zander Cannon (Illustrator)

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Graphic novel. So-so
  butterkidsmom | Jan 18, 2014 |
A quick and easy, graphic novel treatment of the theory of evolution. It is relatively thorough, but the cartoon treatment limits it somewhat. The book presents the basics of the theory, but is a bit light on the evidence presented. Overall, it is a great starting point for people who don't want to slog through a dense, scholarly book on the topic, and might be useful to generate further interest in the subject. ( )
  quantum_flapdoodle | Apr 22, 2013 |
Z really liked this . . . it took several weeks of lunch-time reading to finish it. It's a hard-core look at genetics and evolution, and VERY in-depth/science-y. But funny at the same time.
  beckydj | Mar 30, 2013 |
On the planet Gargal, Bloort, a scientist and servant of the king, invites King Floorsh and Prince Floorsh to see a hologram presentation he created about his research on the history of life on Earth. Bloort then begins to weave a tale that teaches the fascinated young prince about the evolution of earthly life beginning over four billion years ago. This remarkably detailed story reads like a textbook written in the form of a graphic novel. The author and illustrators do not miss a fact and provide a complete account of what middle and high school students need to know about this topic. They discuss the evolution of humans, the various forms of selection, many extinction events throughout history, etc. There is a great deal of information packed into 142 pages and the story moves along quickly, so those unfamiliar with the terms and topics may have difficulty following along. This graphic novel, however, is a wonderful tool for science teachers as it presents the material in a way that may appeal to their students more than a standard textbook. This graphic novel is recommended for middle and high school science collections. The students will hopefully be just as enthusiastic to learn about evolution as Prince Floorsh. ( )
  sguzick | Nov 23, 2012 |
Hosler's presentation of the nuts and bolts of evolutionary theory is a unique treatment of the subject. The work is a fairly unsimplied treatment of Evolution in the form of a comic book. Yes, a comic book. The story is largely told by Bloort, the king's scientist and councilor, but is also shaped by the interjections of Prince Floorsh and his majesty King Floorsh of the Glargalian Empire. Bloort utilizes his Glargalian Holographic Institute of Earth Evolution (G.H.I.E.E) to illustrate his points as he educates the Prince and King concerning the process of evolutionary theory. The GHIEE is like a magical powerpoint. Not only can it provide visions illustrating Bloort's points, but it can also summon the scientists, such as Darwin and Gould, who were instrumental in creating and refining of evolutionary theory throughout history. The book's most interesting aspect beyond its presentation is an entertaining discussion of the experiments that make us look on the at evolution the way we do. Many of which, I was not familiar with after years of study. I am not convinced that this makes the most entertaining presentation for young readers and am curious about how they would see the work. It would seem a brilliant rendition of experimental evidence shaping evolutionary theory to someone who already understood the significance. I am not certain it would be viewed in this manner by the uninitiated -- who are the target audience no doubt.

In the beginning, the cartoon is a bit confusing. An unseen narrator, with little personality, describes the primordial soup that gave rise to primordial cells which combined or evolved independently to yield the recognizable groups of animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. I realize this short beginning is also narrated by Bloort, but this is not clear initially. Once these broad groups of life are introduced, the story is much more captivating. However, I do not mean to imply that the book itself is captivating, but it is certainly a better effort than other entry level texts I have stumbled upon. What makes the book good is not the specific content that it imparts, but the content's presentation. As alluded to before in the first paragraph, this is not some cutesy comic with little substance. It will require investment by the reader. Due to the misinformation regarding evolution displayed by the general public, I think that another presentation is sorely needed. Is Hosler's book what I'm looking for? Not exactly. However, it is at least something new and amusing. It certainly does the job better than a host of textbooks I've perused on the subject so central to the Biological Sciences.
  rgwomack | Nov 14, 2012 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jay Hoslerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cannon, KevinIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Cannon, ZanderIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0809094762, Hardcover)

An accessible graphic introduction to evolution for the most science-phobic reader

Illustrated by the brilliant duo Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon, this volume is written by the noted comic author and professor of biology Jay Hosler. Evolution features the same characters introduced in the highly regarded The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA, now here to explain the fundamentals of the evolution of life on earth. On the heels of explaining to his planetary leader the intricacies of human genetics in The Stuff of Life, the intrepid alien scientist Bloort-183 is charged in this sequel with covering the wider story of evolution. Using the same storytelling conceit that Plenty magazine declared “so charming that you won’t even notice you’ve absorbed an entire scientific field” and that caused Seed to pick The Stuff of Life as a best book of 2008, Evolution brilliantly answers Wired’s demand, “What’s the solution to America’s crisis in science education? More comic books!”

Evolution, the most accessible graphic work on this universally studied subject, takes the reader from earth’s primordial soup to the vestigial structures, like the coccyx and the male nipple, of modern humans. Once again, the award-winning illustrations of the Cannons render the complex clear and everything cleverly comedic. And in Hosler, Evolution has an award-winning biology teacher whose science comics have earned him a National Science Foundation grant and an interview on NPR’s Morning Edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:28:07 -0400)

A graphic-style introduction to evolution, covering everything from Earth's primordial soup to the human body's vestigial structures.

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