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Attachments: A Novel by Rainbow Rowell
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Attachments: A Novel (edition 2012)

by Rainbow Rowell

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1,7661615,784 (4.01)111
Member:shannonlilia
Title:Attachments: A Novel
Authors:Rainbow Rowell
Info:Plume (2012), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work details

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

  1. 41
    Boy Meets Girl by Meg Cabot (kathleen.morrow)
    kathleen.morrow: Similar humor and writing. In both stories, 2 female friends exchange witty, funny emails.
  2. 10
    The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion (foggidawn)
  3. 00
    Mister Romance by Leisa Rayven (fueledbycoffee)
    fueledbycoffee: Slow burn, good writing
  4. 00
    Jemima J: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings and Swans by Jane Green (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: cyber romance and falling in love over email, witty women.
  5. 00
    Love Virtually by Daniel Glattauer (Anonymous user)
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English (158)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (161)
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)
It's not my favorite of Rowell's books but I definitely liked it! It has a unique storyline which was intriguing. However, it's kinda one of those "outside-looking-in" stories which makes it hard to connect to the characters. Nevertheless, still a nice read! ( )
  spellbindingstories | May 24, 2018 |
Meh. I've been on a Rowell kick and I think maybe I came into this one a bit burnt out on her writing style, which I still like. I was excited to read her debut novel and to see how her storytelling panned out with adult characters (her other two books are considered YA). Unfortunately, I found myself underwhelmed with this story. I didn't attach to these characters like I did to the characters in Fangirl and E&P. I also started to notice a formulaic approach to her male and female lead characters and it irked me. I still love how quick and fun Rowell's novels are and I'm excited to read the next one...just maybe not right away. ( )
  JamieBH | Apr 3, 2018 |
I didn't dislike it, as a matter of fact I was pretty entertained. It's just that the fact that I was entertained enough to finish it doesn't make it a great book. The premise is interesting, reading the emails is interesting, but there are flaws. Lincoln reminded me of a few people I know in real life, so it was hard to find him creepy as many other reviewers have pointed out. More like incredibly socially awkward in terms of women/flirting and unable to break the habit that gave him boosts of self confidence. Beth and Jennifer were amusing, though I found it strange that they used email instead of meeting in person to discuss some of the more serious topics. ( )
  Rekki | Apr 1, 2018 |
This is the first Rainbow Rowell book that I read and I enjoyed it. The writing in this book was very different than any book I've read before. We get to know Beth and Jennifer through their email exchange. At first, I felt that Lincoln was sort of a mama's boy with no self motivation for much of anything but as the story develops I relate a lot more to his personality and way of being. I loved the 90's references and I loved the relationship between Beth and Jennifer. What I loved most about this book is that it reminds me of a time when things were much simpler. Overall this was a fun read. ( )
  Silent_Whispers | Mar 30, 2018 |
Probably the only Rainbow Rowell book which did not lend to a disappointing ending. I find that a lot of the time, like with Landline or Eleanor and Park, a solid story and romance is set up but never finished. Attachments had everything you would expect in a contemporary book. There were some hilarious lines like when Lincoln says “ Beth was staring at the screen like she was awaiting instructions from the Holy spirit…”Scenes like these had me laughing out loud and allowed for an enjoyable experience throughout the book. Furthermore, being near the ages of the characters, it was easy to put myself in their shoes. I was able to empathize with the societal pressures they were facing like moving out and getting married. Overall, it was an enjoyable book with funny dialogue, a great set up, and a sweet ending. One star was removed if only for the way in which one of the characters was treated. I didn’t like the treating of a specific woman as inferior simply because of her size. At one point, Beth makes fun of this girl so that she could feel better about herself. Women putting down other women sucks and I wish it hadn’t been in the book. But other than that, it was a quick and romantic read which I thoroughly enjoyed. I cannot wait to see what Rainbow releases next. ( )
  frailrouge | Mar 28, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)
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For Kai, who's better than fiction
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From: Jennifer Scribner-Snyder
To: Beth Fremont
Sent: Wed, 08/18/1999 9:06AM
Subject: Where are you?

Would it kill you to get here before noon?
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Book description
A strikingly clever and deeply moving story about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself. Even if it's someone you've never met.

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder, coworkers at The Courier, know the newspaper monitors their office e-mail. But they still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers, and baring their personal lives like an open book. Jennifer tells Beth everything she can't seem to tell her husband about her anxieties over starting a family. And Beth tells Jennifer everything, period.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O'Neill still can't believe that it's his job to monitor other people's e-mail. When he applied to be an Internet security officer, he pictured himself protecting the newspaper from dangerous hackers — not sending out memos every time somebody in Accounting forwarded an off-color joke to the person in the next cubicle.

Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't quite bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help being entertained — and captivated — by their stories. But, by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. What would he say to her? "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you?"

With snapping dialogue and irresistible charm, Rainbow Rowell transforms an ordinary IT guy into a lovable and endearing romantic hero and proves that falling in love never happens the way you plan it. Written with whip-smart precision and charm, Attachments is a fresh and energetic debut that marks the arrival of an exciting new voice in fiction.

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0525951989, Hardcover)

"Attachments is so perfectly engaging, so sly, and so funny I read it all in one sitting, then went back and read my favorite scenes a second time...I hope Rowell never stops writing."
-Haven Kimmel


Beth and Jennifer know their company monitors their office e-mail. But the women still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers at the newspaper and baring their personal lives like an open book. Jennifer tells Beth everything she can't seem to tell her husband about her anxieties over starting a family. And Beth tells Jennifer everything, period.

When Lincoln applied to be an Internet security officer, he hardly imagined he'd be sifting through other people's inboxes like some sort of electronic Peeping Tom. Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't quite bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help but be entertained-and captivated- by their stories.

But by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. What would he say to her? "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you." After a series of close encounters and missed connections, Lincoln decides it's time to muster the courage to follow his heart . . . even if he can't see exactly where it's leading him.

Written with whip-smart precision and charm, Attachments is a strikingly clever and deeply romantic debut about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself. Even if it's someone you've never met.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:56 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"'Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you...' Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It's company policy.) But they can't quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives. Meanwhile, Lincoln O'Neill can't believe this is his job now--reading other people's e-mail. When he applied to be 'internet security officer,' he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers--not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke. When Lincoln comes across Beth's and Jennifer's messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can't help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories. By the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late to introduce himself. What would he say . . . ?"… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

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