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Attachments by Rainbow Rowell
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Attachments (edition 2011)

by Rainbow Rowell

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1,9041745,394 (4.01)117
Member:Dutton
Title:Attachments
Authors:Rainbow Rowell
Info:Dutton Adult (2011), Hardcover, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work details

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

Recently added byrena75, sarahhepworth, smkelley, private library, sloane33, lesmel
  1. 41
    Boy Meets Girl by Meg Cabot (kathleen.morrow)
    kathleen.morrow: Similar humor and writing. In both stories, 2 female friends exchange witty, funny emails.
  2. 10
    The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion (foggidawn)
  3. 00
    Mister Romance by Leisa Rayven (fueledbycoffee)
    fueledbycoffee: Slow burn, good writing
  4. 00
    Jemima J: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings and Swans by Jane Green (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: cyber romance and falling in love over email, witty women.
  5. 00
    Love Virtually by Daniel Glattauer (Anonymous user)
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» See also 117 mentions

English (171)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (174)
Showing 1-5 of 171 (next | show all)
I am so glad that I joined in the Booksplosion read-along. I really enjoyed reading Attachments and have rated it 4 stars.

I have decided to review in a new way, under three sub-headings:

BOOK: (QUALITY OF WRITING)

This is my first Rainbow Rowell book and judging by this I will definitely want to pick up another of her books. I love Lincoln's character. He appears to me like an adult Peter Pan, in the sense that he is fearful of growing up. Still living at home after years of studying, he is stuck in a dead end job. He has a vulnerability about him which makes his transgressions acceptable. He has been hurt before and this is reflected in his choice of work, (which involves a fair amount of solitude working the night shift in a bizarre IT job scouring emails for undesirable flagged references), and in his relationships, (to begin with he only interacts with his sister, his mum and his D&D friends.)

You can't help but forgive him when he reads Beth's and Jennifer's emails even though he is intruding on their private exchange of friendly banter, because he is a big cuddly, lonely bear with a warm heart. This is his way of falling in love again, at a safe enough distance, so that he won't get hurt. The more he reads their wonderful emails the more he comes alive, and his confidence grows.

The characters are well crafted, and believable. I especially liked Beth, Jennifer, Lincoln's mum and Doris.

Beth and Jennifers' warm, and caring, relationship comes across beautifully via their unguarded emails.


CRYSTALS: (LIGHTNESS/DARKNESS)

This is my lightness rating. Is the book light hearted or will it leave you in floods of tears? For me, it was definitely a light hearted read. I found the short chapters drew me into the novel, making me want to turn the page to see what happened next. I read this book quickly. This is the perfect book for lovers of romance, who enjoy a well written story with interesting characters and observations.

MAGIC: IS THE ENDING MAGICAL?

*** BEWARE SPOILERS BELOW****

Did the ending satisfy, or was it a let down? Before I embark on this I just want to touch upon the food references in the book which were really amusing, and it seems appropriate to add them under my magic section! Lincoln's mother lovingly cooks copious amounts of food, that Lincoln can no longer stomach so he shares his food with Doris, an older lady at work. Doris becomes his way to escape his mother's overbearing love. He willingly shares half of the food, because he wants to grow up, get a life, be an adult. At first, Lincoln's mother is upset by Lincoln's act of rebellion, but when she realises how much Doris enjoys her food, she accepts the situation. Lincoln is now able to move on with his life, become an adult, and find love again. I found this so relatable as my Malaysian mother is a wonderful cook and always makes lots of tasty food!

There seems to be differing opinions on Goodreads about the conclusion of the novel, some people found the ending cheesy. But in my opinion the ending works because Lincoln has been hurt, and is longing for love, and falls in love with Beth without even seeing her. He means no harm, and is guilty about intruding into Beth's privacy. He is a nice guy. Beth sees Lincoln, and is attracted to him, but doesn't really know him, yet she senses that he has a big enough heart for her, this is suggested by Lincoln's stature, he is not a thin rake of a guy. There is plenty of room there for a big heart. Ultimately they are both eccentric as each other and so is the ending! I loved it.

( )
  marjorie.mallon | Mar 27, 2019 |
fun romcom ( )
  suedutton | Mar 25, 2019 |
Vacation reading: First book done. Attachments, another great book by Rainbow Rowell. This is actually two stories running parallel to each other, the first is Lincoln, the IT guy whose job is to monitor the company email for policy violations, and Beth and her friend Jennifer who discuss most of their lives via company email in violation of company policy. The emails between Beth and Jennifer’s emails quickly become the best part of Lincoln’s days and take an interesting twist when Beth starts including details about her crush on a mystery guy in the office he immediately recognizes as himself. It’s sweet and awkward and you’ll be rooting for a happy ending for everyone. Definitely a good summer read. 4/5 stars ⭐️ ( )
  justjoshinreads | Mar 22, 2019 |
This really wasn't my kind of book. Whether it's to do with taste or it's an age thing (22), where I'll connect with this kind of book better when I'm older... I don't know. I'll try to explain this so if your reading tastes are the same as mine, you might think to avoid this one.

First off, it was decently written. Particularly for Rainbow Rowell's debut. It had some wit and charm to it. And the concept behind the book- a guy hired to read the emails of newspaper staff falls in love with a girl he's never met- is really clever.
But there was sort of an ennui to it. That vibe you get from certain adult fiction books, that mild dissatisfaction with domestic life, you know? The slow-burning kind of drama. The main characters in this book had that, and it made this a sluggish read for me. I prefer passion & new beginnings I guess, compared to watching something fall apart.
There were a few other things that bugged me. The emails were a bit unrealistic (though the book is set in the year 2000, so maybe correct for the time?), longish sometimes, where the characters would essentially narrate a scene in email form. There were a few too many movie references and cliches for me, particularly in the romance. I love a good pop culture reference, but this went a bit too far. And finally, I didn't really buy into the romance- I felt like after a certain point of email reading, it was doomed.

So basically, my style is more Fangirl than Attachments. For me, at times this book was at times mildly pleasant, and at times mildly unpleasant. No extremes. I'd probably avoid any similar books in future, but only because I don't enjoy them as much as I'd like to, not because I hate them or anything.

( )
  Sweet_Serenity | Mar 14, 2019 |
well that was cute. loved it a lot more than any of her YA novels. ( )
  jawink22 | Feb 6, 2019 |
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For Kai, who's better than fiction
First words
From: Jennifer Scribner-Snyder
To: Beth Fremont
Sent: Wed, 08/18/1999 9:06AM
Subject: Where are you?

Would it kill you to get here before noon?
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Book description
A strikingly clever and deeply moving story about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself. Even if it's someone you've never met.

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder, coworkers at The Courier, know the newspaper monitors their office e-mail. But they still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers, and baring their personal lives like an open book. Jennifer tells Beth everything she can't seem to tell her husband about her anxieties over starting a family. And Beth tells Jennifer everything, period.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O'Neill still can't believe that it's his job to monitor other people's e-mail. When he applied to be an Internet security officer, he pictured himself protecting the newspaper from dangerous hackers — not sending out memos every time somebody in Accounting forwarded an off-color joke to the person in the next cubicle.

Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't quite bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help being entertained — and captivated — by their stories. But, by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. What would he say to her? "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you?"

With snapping dialogue and irresistible charm, Rainbow Rowell transforms an ordinary IT guy into a lovable and endearing romantic hero and proves that falling in love never happens the way you plan it. Written with whip-smart precision and charm, Attachments is a fresh and energetic debut that marks the arrival of an exciting new voice in fiction.

Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0525951989, Hardcover)

"Attachments is so perfectly engaging, so sly, and so funny I read it all in one sitting, then went back and read my favorite scenes a second time...I hope Rowell never stops writing."
-Haven Kimmel


Beth and Jennifer know their company monitors their office e-mail. But the women still spend all day sending each other messages, gossiping about their coworkers at the newspaper and baring their personal lives like an open book. Jennifer tells Beth everything she can't seem to tell her husband about her anxieties over starting a family. And Beth tells Jennifer everything, period.

When Lincoln applied to be an Internet security officer, he hardly imagined he'd be sifting through other people's inboxes like some sort of electronic Peeping Tom. Lincoln is supposed to turn people in for misusing company e-mail, but he can't quite bring himself to crack down on Beth and Jennifer. He can't help but be entertained-and captivated- by their stories.

But by the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late for him to ever introduce himself. What would he say to her? "Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you." After a series of close encounters and missed connections, Lincoln decides it's time to muster the courage to follow his heart . . . even if he can't see exactly where it's leading him.

Written with whip-smart precision and charm, Attachments is a strikingly clever and deeply romantic debut about falling in love with the person who makes you feel like the best version of yourself. Even if it's someone you've never met.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:56 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"'Hi, I'm the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you...' Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It's company policy.) But they can't quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives. Meanwhile, Lincoln O'Neill can't believe this is his job now--reading other people's e-mail. When he applied to be 'internet security officer,' he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers--not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke. When Lincoln comes across Beth's and Jennifer's messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can't help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories. By the time Lincoln realizes he's falling for Beth, it's way too late to introduce himself. What would he say . . . ?"… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

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