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The Death Cure by James Dashner
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The Death Cure

by James Dashner

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Maze Runner (3)

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2,5981492,301 (3.56)62
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English (143)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (148)
Showing 1-5 of 143 (next | show all)
This is intelligent, unpredictable and totally engrossing. A roller coaster of a book that grabs you from the first sentence and doesn't let you go till the last. I loved the characters and the dynamics between Thomas and Teresa which were left quite unresolved, but ultimately satisfying. It was great! ( )
  mmacd3814 | May 30, 2016 |
I felt by this time Thomas would have gotten a clue. For a genius, well, he isn't very bright. He is whiney and self absorbed. Granted, most teenage boys are but he is supposed to be special and smarter than the average person. I got tired of him in book two but wanter to finish the series. I am wishing it moved along faster so I finished sooner. ( )
  weisser4 | May 3, 2016 |
A gripping final installment of this series. This is the first time I cried in one of these books...that final act that Thomas was forced to do to a friend pushed me over the edge. I was disappointed at two of the deaths that occurred. I understand people have to die in books like these, but I was disappointed. I was happy with the overall resolution though, who Thomas ended up with and saving, the idea of the Immunes getting to start over again while the infected people died off. It's a good way to tie everything all up. ( )
  MynTop | Apr 8, 2016 |
I was really impressed with the strong finale of the series. Dashner does an incredible job keeping the suspense up and breaking our hearts when they need to be broken, not to mention reinventing labyrinthine horror! It actually strikes me as a dystopian take on Walpole's the Castle of Otranto in which the most prevalent theme is that the sins of the fathers will be visited upon the sons (which essentially means consequences will always come around). I like seeing the theme again here acting as the terrain of the post-apocalyptic world. Unfortunately, that also might be the reason some readers found it a bit lacking in substance. Dashner sets up a promising premise and does a good job redefining what reality means for the gladers, but he also utilizes some archetypal narrative devices which is why some scenes may remind you of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. But at the same time, I think he applies such archetypal narrative devices very creatively, combining them with conspiracies and corrupt institutions. You have to give the story arc credit as an impressive platform for social commentary, though, regarding everything from the principles of utilitarianism to the flare's relevance in modern day degenerative diseases and the complexities of euthanasia. Overall, I think Dashner did a great job creating a fast-paced dystopian thriller which communicates ideas on multiple levels. ( )
  suttonrl | Mar 31, 2016 |
I was really impressed with the strong finale of the series. Dashner does an incredible job keeping the suspense up and breaking our hearts when they need to be broken, not to mention reinventing labyrinthine horror! It actually strikes me as a dystopian take on Walpole's the Castle of Otranto in which the most prevalent theme is that the sins of the fathers will be visited upon the sons (which essentially means consequences will always come around). I like seeing the theme again here acting as the terrain of the post-apocalyptic world. Unfortunately, that also might be the reason some readers found it a bit lacking in substance. Dashner sets up a promising premise and does a good job redefining what reality means for the gladers, but he also utilizes some archetypal narrative devices which is why some scenes may remind you of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. But at the same time, I think he applies such archetypal narrative devices very creatively, combining them with conspiracies and corrupt institutions. You have to give the story arc credit as an impressive platform for social commentary, though, regarding everything from the principles of utilitarianism to the flare's relevance in modern day degenerative diseases and the complexities of euthanasia. Overall, I think Dashner did a great job creating a fast-paced dystopian thriller which communicates ideas on multiple levels. ( )
  suttonrl | Mar 31, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 143 (next | show all)
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James Dashnerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Deakins, MarkReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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It was the smell that began to drive Thomas slightly mad. Not being alone for over three weeks. Not the white walls, ceiling and floor.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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As the third Trial draws to a close, Thomas and some of his cohorts manage to escape from WICKED, their memories having been restored, only to face new dangers as WICKED claims to be trying to protect the human race from the deadly FLARE virus.

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