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Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory…
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Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom (2003)

by Cory Doctorow

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,079954,705 (3.54)73
  1. 00
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    Truncat by Cory Doctorow (jshrop)
  5. 00
    Scroogled by Cory Doctorow (Liberuno)
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» See also 73 mentions

English (89)  French (5)  Romanian (1)  All languages (95)
Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
This book was pretty strange. It is another recommendation from my husband (and something we already had on our shelf). I think I need to stop listening to his suggestions.



It was a quick read - I will give it that. At just 200 pages, I was able to finish it up in a little more than a day of reading. It is set far into the future - people actually live in Disney World. The cast members that run the rides run the park, and there is a "war" that goes on among part of the different lands. The rides that we all know and love are still there, but have been made a bit better with time. But they try to keep the rides true to themselves. The park still operates as a park, even though people actually live there full time.



That was the interesting part of the story. IT would be cool to have the park be in existece in 2400 and the beloved rides still there. But that is where the interesting part of this story stops. There is strange language that is never explained to the reader (which Mat tells me is the beauty of the book. "The characters know what it is, so they don't need to explain it" yeah yeah). Money is no longer a way you get things in life - it is social status, which is automatically uploaded to you through a chip that ever person has installed in their brain. You never die - you just get a new body when the old one wears out (or you are accidentally killed). You have to upload your memory continually into a database so that if you need a new body, you can pick up where you left off.



It was a neat enough idea, and I - knowing my husband well - can see why he liked this book. He warned me it was strange, and it was. But I read it, and now I can move on. ( )
  JenMat | Jan 10, 2019 |
Rival groups of futuristic theme-park imagineers have a dispute on how to run their respective rides - the old fashioned way or through virtual reality.

An interesting glance at a possible future where humans enhance their cognitive abilities by wearing visors connected to some sort of computer. ( )
  matija2019 | Jan 8, 2019 |
I personally did not like this book at all. It was very confusing and written assuming the reader would understand what terms like "Whuffie" and "Bitchun" meant. By the time that I finally understood these terms, I was halfway through the book. I believe that "Down and out" would be a very interesting upon the second or third time reading it, however, I didn't think it was worth my time.

It is VERY imaginative.
It is VERY quirky.
It is VERY satirical.

Just could've used more explaining. ( )
  KatelynSBolds | Nov 12, 2018 |
Set in a future world where everyone has implants, think connected to the web at all times. Death is virtually non-existent, you die and you have your consciousness transported into a new clone of yourself. The story takes place in Walt Disney World which again is in the future. They are redoing the Hall of Presidents and removing the animatronics. Their being replaced with what they call flash baked. You get visceral and factual information about the presidents just slammed into your brain. Think of Neo learning Kung Fu in a second. The main characters are trying to save the Haunted Mansion from getting the same treatment. They want it to stay closer to the original concept. But the gang who has control of the presidents has they're eye on the mansion too. Was an interesting read. Seemed to race right through it. Is a good book for fans of the theme parks. ( )
  ChrisWeir | Mar 2, 2018 |
Not sure why, but this novel dragged terribly, and every time I took it up again I had to force myself to read more than a few pages - and that's although awesome ideas litter the floor of the future Disney Land where the protagonist fights not to get murdered again and to maintain the family business. But Jules remained bland and pale in my mind, just as his girlfriend and most of the other chars. ( )
  DeusXMachina | Mar 1, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cory Doctorowprimary authorall editionscalculated
Collica, MichaelDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eshkar, ShelleyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I lived long enough to see the cure for death; to see the rise of the Bitchun Society, to learn ten languages; to compose three symphonies; to realize my boyhood dream of taking up residence in Disney World; to see the death of the workplace and of work.
Quotations
You don't want to be a post-person. You want to stay human.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 076530953X, Paperback)

On The Skids In The Transhuman Future

Jules is a young man barely a century old. He's lived long enough to see the cure for death and the end of scarcity, to learn ten languages and compose three symphonies...and to realize his boyhood dream of taking up residence in Disney World.

Disney World! The greatest artistic achievement of the long-ago twentieth century. Now in the keeping of a network of "ad-hocs" who keep the classic attractions running as they always have, enhanced with only the smallest high-tech touches.

Now, though, the "ad hocs" are under attack. A new group has taken over the Hall of the Presidents, and is replacing its venerable audioanimatronics with new, immersive direct-to-brain interfaces that give guests the illusion of being Washington, Lincoln, and all the others. For Jules, this is an attack on the artistic purity of Disney World itself.

Worse: it appears this new group has had Jules killed. This upsets him. (It's only his fourth death and revival, after all.) Now it's war....

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:26 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Jules is a young man barely a century old. He's lived long enough to see the cure for death and the end of scarcity, to learn ten languages and compose three symphonies...and to realize his boyhood dream of taking up residence in Disney World. Disney World! The greatest artistic achievement of the long-ago twentieth century. Now in the keeping of a network of "ad-hocs" who keep the classic attractions running as they always have, enhanced with only the smallest high-tech touches. Now, though, the "ad hocs" are under attack. A new group has taken over the Hall of the Presidents, and is replacing its venerable audioanimatronics with new, immersive direct-to-brain interfaces that give guests the illusion of being Washington, Lincoln, and all the others. For Jules, this is an attack on the artistic purity of Disney World itself. Worse: it appears this new group has had Jules killed. This upsets him. (It's only his fourth death and revival, after all.) Now it's war....… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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