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Tres Tristes Tigres (Em Portugues do Brasil)…
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Tres Tristes Tigres (Em Portugues do Brasil) (original 1966; edition 2009)

by Guilhermo Cabrera Infante (Author)

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6321326,342 (3.81)24
Cabrera Infante's masterpiece, Three Trapped Tigers is one of the most playful books to reach the U.S. from Cuba. Filled with puns, wordplay, lists upon lists, and Sternean typography--such as the section entitled "Some Revelations," which consists of several blank pages--this novel has been praised as a more modern, sexier, funnier, Cuban Ulysses. Centering on the recollections of a man separated from both his country and his youth, Cabrera Infante creates an enchanting vision of life and the many colorful characters found in steamy Havana's pre-Castro cabaret society.… (more)
Member:RuiFlores
Title:Tres Tristes Tigres (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Authors:Guilhermo Cabrera Infante (Author)
Info:José Olympio (2009)
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Three Trapped Tigers by Guillermo Cabrera Infante (1966)

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» See also 24 mentions

English (9)  Spanish (3)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (13)
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Nothing to see here people. Move along.

At least, if you’ve read any Sterne (1759) or later Joyce or Tristram Shandy or Ulysses (1904) in particular, you will find all this (1967) has been done long, long before, and it will start to pale on you very shortly after you begin the novel.

Worse, though, is that it hails from Latin America, an area of the world I’ve long had no literary inspiration from, with one minor exception. That only compounded my misery.

In fact, I’m betting the only reason it’s on the 1001 books list is its Cuban origin, as if to say, “Look, they finally figured out how to write copy crazy stuff over there, too.” ( )
  arukiyomi | Aug 23, 2020 |
I was dizzy and short of breath when I finally saw this on the shelves at Twice-Told back in my Boom days. My vertigo may have been induced by the fact that I lived on espresso and spent all food money on books and cds. Those were strange times of death-trap automobiles and working two full-time jobs to remain poor but literate.

The friendship displayed in the Three Trapped Tigers was beyond moving. The erudition itself was arresting but the emotional bond within the text captured me. I have felt those sinuous bonds throughout my life but this was a confirmation, especially at such a vulnerable juncture. One's youth is so vulnerable, later it becomes simply debatable. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
A picaresque trawl through the bars and clubs of pre-revolutionary Havana. It's La Dolce Vita in Latin America, a whirligig of language, jokes, anagrams and puns - it's a humid Cuban fever dream of sex and jazz. ( )
  haarpsichord | Nov 5, 2018 |
The book is indescribable. The back jacket says something along the lines of it being a Cuban Ulysses. It's not really a book you can read; it's more of a book that you sink into and let the words swirl around you. I enjoyed much of it, was confounded by even more, and it's LONG. Reading it is a commitment. ( )
  ELiz_M | Apr 6, 2013 |
Tedious, drab, lifeless, insipid, vapid, tiresome, morose,exhausting, laborious, arduous, lacklustre, humourless and just plain boring.

The first line may give you a rough idea as to how much I enjoyed this book. In fact if I could have given it a minus score I probably would have, it gets 1 simply because it is finally over and done with.

The story such as it is, is little more than a group of friends recalling anecdotes about their late night jaunts around a Havana's pre-Castro nightclubs. OK I get that it is full of puns, allusions and clever word-games but it was just dull, dull,dull.

Why oh why did I not listen to that little voice that on page 10,20,50,75,100,130,200,343 said just give in because come the end of the book I was no wiser than when I first started just a lot greyer ( )
1 vote PilgrimJess | Mar 15, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (66 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Guillermo Cabrera Infanteprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hermans, Hub.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vries, Fred deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zeiler, TessaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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". . . And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle looks like after the candle is blown out."
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Cabrera Infante's masterpiece, Three Trapped Tigers is one of the most playful books to reach the U.S. from Cuba. Filled with puns, wordplay, lists upon lists, and Sternean typography--such as the section entitled "Some Revelations," which consists of several blank pages--this novel has been praised as a more modern, sexier, funnier, Cuban Ulysses. Centering on the recollections of a man separated from both his country and his youth, Cabrera Infante creates an enchanting vision of life and the many colorful characters found in steamy Havana's pre-Castro cabaret society.

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