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UnWholly (Unwind) by Neal Shusterman
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UnWholly (Unwind) (edition 2012)

by Neal Shusterman

Series: Unwind (2)

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313None35,324 (4.14)19
Member:agrudzien
Title:UnWholly (Unwind)
Authors:Neal Shusterman
Info:Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (2012), Hardcover, 416 pages
Collections:YA
Rating:****
Tags:YA, Lexile 800s, (860), dystopian

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Unwholly by Neal Shusterman

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» See also 19 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 28 (next | show all)
Young Reader Reaction: Unwind was unbelievable. I picked it up because I had to read dystopian fiction for school. Not only did I find myself liking it more and more, I knew I had to read the rest of the books in the series. Unwholly is is such a good read that I can't wait until I have the chance to read the third and fourth books. Neal Shusterman is no doubt my favorite author. He is the master of writing thrilling science fiction. If you see any of his books, I would recommend that you pick it up if you're middle school and up.

Adult Reader Reaction: Review pending.

Pros: Great characters and an action-filled story make this book (and the others in the series) impossible to put down. Even kids who don't normally read dystopian fiction will be hooked.

To read our full review, go to The Reading Tub®.
  TheReadingTub | Mar 11, 2014 |
UnWholly (Unwind, #2) I honestly did not enjoy UnWholly nearly half so much as I did Unwind. I'm a little disappointed about that. I don't really understand how a story with such an intense topic as Unwinding could be so utterly boring, but that is exactly what it was for the first 3/4ths of the book. The last 1/4 was much better and exactly what I was hoping for in this sequel. Unfortunately the last quarter did not make up for the majority of the book which was less than average. One of the aspects I enjoyed about this book was that each chapter began with a news report or public service announcements that gave a perspective about what living in this world would be like. For example, there are several public service announcements that talk about the people whose lives were enhanced by Unwinding and the benefits to the community. It's disturbing, but it really shows how the people in this world view things. The writing itself was very bland and lifeless for most of the book. While there were at times a bit of action taking place in the story, it was told in such a way that it was almost as thrilling as watching someone play chess while talking you through each move. There was a lot of angst and worrying and whining among the characters but I felt I had lost any connection I had with any of the characters from the first book.UnWholly nearly redeemed itself in the last quarter when all of the set up of the previous chapters finally began coming together into a coherent story. It was almost too little too late but I will likely continue on to the third book in this series solely on the strength of how much I loved Unwind. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
UnWholly (Unwind, #2) I honestly did not enjoy UnWholly nearly half so much as I did Unwind. I'm a little disappointed about that. I don't really understand how a story with such an intense topic as Unwinding could be so utterly boring, but that is exactly what it was for the first 3/4ths of the book. The last 1/4 was much better and exactly what I was hoping for in this sequel. Unfortunately the last quarter did not make up for the majority of the book which was less than average. One of the aspects I enjoyed about this book was that each chapter began with a news report or public service announcements that gave a perspective about what living in this world would be like. For example, there are several public service announcements that talk about the people whose lives were enhanced by Unwinding and the benefits to the community. It's disturbing, but it really shows how the people in this world view things. The writing itself was very bland and lifeless for most of the book. While there were at times a bit of action taking place in the story, it was told in such a way that it was almost as thrilling as watching someone play chess while talking you through each move. There was a lot of angst and worrying and whining among the characters but I felt I had lost any connection I had with any of the characters from the first book.UnWholly nearly redeemed itself in the last quarter when all of the set up of the previous chapters finally began coming together into a coherent story. It was almost too little too late but I will likely continue on to the third book in this series solely on the strength of how much I loved Unwind. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
UnWholly by Neil Shusterman is a great book. It is book 2 out a series of 3. Connor owns the Graveyard. The Admiral gave it to him after he had a stroke or a heart attack. Lev saves the unwinds. Risa lives at the Graveyard but she can't walk because she lost her legs in the explosion in Unwind after an explosion. She had an option to get new legs from an unwind but she says no. Connor accepts getting new body parts. They thought he was a guard. So RIsa meets this monstrosity named Cam and he fell in love with her. She gets a new spine and legs. So she makes all these speeches and pretends to date Cam.

This book is great for whoever enjoys battles and things like that. Also for people that enjoy violence. It was a good book over all but really violent. ( )
  br14kaiho | Dec 13, 2013 |
Unwholly is the second book in a series: this is a ****spoiler warning**** for the first book, Unwind.

Connor, presumed dead by the authorities, is running the Graveyard, a home to the kids still under 17 who are in danger of being “unwound.” Risa works with him as a medic, in a wheelchair because she refused to accept the spine of an unwind – a teen who has been unwound into a “divided” state, with basically all parts used medically for transfusion and transplant. Lev, the former “clapper” who did not clap and detonate the explosives in his blood, has gone through medical treatment to make himself stable and is now feeling stifled, talking to kids in danger of being unwound but unable to speak out against unwinding either.

The book is hard to describe if you haven't read the first book, and would be hard to follow as a standalone as well. The future civilization Shusterman describes has an element of possibility in it: what if really screwed up teenagers were “unwound” to provide organ and other transplants? What if abortion didn't exist, but you could leave an unwanted baby at a doorstep as long as you weren't caught (a practice known as “storking”), with the expectation that the owners of the house would take the child? This series explores the implications of this dystopia, with no easy answers. Unwholly takes up soon after Unwind left off, continuing the multi-perspective switches between Connor, Risa and Lev, and adding some new characters in Starkey, Miracolina, and the “parts pirate” Nelson, who's after runaway unwinds (also known as AWOLs, the kids whose parents have signed the unwind order but who get away before they are picked up to go to “harvest camp”) for the black market. Another new character, Cam, adds another element to the mix as a sort of Frankenstein creation from the parts of unwound kids. Is he merely a conglomeration of all these parts, or is he more? Does he have his own soul? A creepy, fast-paced, and thought-provoking series I'm looking forward to continuing soon. ( )
  bell7 | Nov 26, 2013 |
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For Charlotte Ruth Shusterman
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He's fighting a nightmare when they come for him.
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"Thanks to Connor, Lev, and Risa, and their high-profile revolt at Happy Jack Harvest Camp, people can no longer turn a blind eye to unwinding. Ridding society of troublesome teens and, in the same stroke, providing much-needed tissues for transplant might be convenient, but its morality has finally been brought into question. However, unwinding has become big business, and there are powerful political and corporate interests that want to see it not only continue, but expand, allowing the unwinding of prisoners and the impoverished. Cam is a teen who does not exist. He is made entirely out of the parts of other unwinds. Cam, a 21st century Frankenstein, struggles with a search for identity and meaning, as well as the concept of his own soul, if indeed a rewound being can have one. When a sadistic bounty hunter who takes "trophies" from the unwinds he captures starts to pursue Connor, Risa and Lev, Cam finds his fate inextricably bound with theirs"--… (more)

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