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Washington's Crossing by David Hackett…
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Great story telling ( )
  ibkennedy | May 13, 2017 |
This book was selected in my top three books for the first quarter of 2012.

Why study history? What does it matter to me? Because it shows the contingency in events that unfold in time and place. The book explores the author's viewpoint on a contingency in history; "people making choices, and choices making a difference in the world."363. The choices were made from what the participants felt about the events that were unfolding. The Brits viewed the rebels as a bunch of yeoman farmers. The Americans viewed the British as an enormous dinosaur that did not know its tail form its nose.

Had Washington not been General? Had General Charles Lee not been captured? (Lee would have stalled Washington from crossing the river, as he was the typical overcautious general.) Had the Hessian Forces and Brits not been overconfident? Had a woman not kept the Hessian General at home, instead of in his key position on the battle front? Then the American Story would have been quit different.

The book was great in displaying the way that Washington's Story was told by different authors with different purposes. He shows with honesty how the facts can be skewed to prove the point of any political platform. Before reading this book I always believed that the Hessian Army was drunk when Washington attacked it. From the facts assembled this has proven to be not true. But somewhere the myth has replaced the facts. We now believe that the Hessian Army was a bunch of drunken dolts.



I loved this book. I discovered a lot about this event that I did not know before. He writes in a way that is truly a pleasure to read.



The only draw back was that on my kindle the maps were hard to read. But that is what they created magnifying glass for. ( )
  Gregorio_Roth | Dec 5, 2014 |
This book was selected in my top three books for the first quarter of 2012.

Why study history? What does it matter to me? Because it shows the contingency in events that unfold in time and place. The book explores the author's viewpoint on a contingency in history; "people making choices, and choices making a difference in the world."363. The choices were made from what the participants felt about the events that were unfolding. The Brits viewed the rebels as a bunch of yeoman farmers. The Americans viewed the British as an enormous dinosaur that did not know its tail form its nose.

Had Washington not been General? Had General Charles Lee not been captured? (Lee would have stalled Washington from crossing the river, as he was the typical overcautious general.) Had the Hessian Forces and Brits not been overconfident? Had a woman not kept the Hessian General at home, instead of in his key position on the battle front? Then the American Story would have been quit different.

The book was great in displaying the way that Washington's Story was told by different authors with different purposes. He shows with honesty how the facts can be skewed to prove the point of any political platform. Before reading this book I always believed that the Hessian Army was drunk when Washington attacked it. From the facts assembled this has proven to be not true. But somewhere the myth has replaced the facts. We now believe that the Hessian Army was a bunch of drunken dolts.



I loved this book. I discovered a lot about this event that I did not know before. He writes in a way that is truly a pleasure to read.



The only draw back was that on my kindle the maps were hard to read. But that is what they created magnifying glass for. ( )
  Gregorio_Roth | Dec 5, 2014 |
Fischer is my favorite writer of history, though this book held fewer surprises (events unknown to me) than my all-time favorite non-fiction work, [Albion's Seed], also by Fischer.

Using untold journals and diaries, plus pensioner's narratives housed in the National Archives, Fischer brings to life events and people that shaped the war, and without too great an exaggeration, our lives today. I will be a bit political here, and add that, in my opinion, Washington and the Continental Congress would be appalled and ashamed of American conduct in the Iraq war.

Although Nelson Runger did a much better job in narrating this book than he did in [The Path Between the Seas] by David McCullough, there must be a better history reader available. Only once during this long book did I feel like he was speaking through a mouth full of saliva. Don't audio books use directors? ( )
1 vote kaulsu | Aug 16, 2013 |
Military history of the key early portions of the American War of Independence, emphasizing both generalship and reliance on groups of soldiers. Fischer gives biographies of the key men (and a couple of women) in what was essentially, from both sides’ perspectives, a civil war, and concentrates on what began as a very bad year for the rebels, with constant losses, and ended with momentum on the American side after key New Jersey battles. One thing that stood out was that some things haven’t changed at all: if you rape/plunder/kill the locals, you lose their support; small unorganized forces can inflict disproportionate damage on even well-trained organized troops far from home. ( )
1 vote rivkat | May 21, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
Fischer has devised a storytelling technique that combines old and new methods in a winning way.
 
At the core of an impeccably researched, brilliantly executed military history is an analysis of George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River in December 1776 and the resulting destruction of the Hessian garrison of Trenton and defeat of a British brigade at Princeton.
added by readysetgo | editPublishers Weekly (Jan 12, 2004)
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 019518159X, Paperback)

Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia.

Yet, as David Hackett Fischer recounts in this riveting history, George Washington--and many other Americans--refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and attacked the exhausted Hessian garrison at Trenton, killing or capturing nearly a thousand men. A second battle of Trenton followed within days. The Americans held off a counterattack by Lord Cornwallis's best troops, then were almost trapped by the British force. Under cover of night, Washington's men stole behind the enemy and struck them again, defeating a brigade at Princeton. The British were badly shaken. In twelve weeks of winter fighting, their army suffered severe damage, their hold on New Jersey was broken, and their strategy was ruined.

Fischer's richly textured narrative reveals the crucial role of contingency in these events. We see how the campaign unfolded in a sequence of difficult choices by many actors, from generals to civilians, on both sides. While British and German forces remained rigid and hierarchical, Americans evolved an open and flexible system that was fundamental to their success. The startling success of Washington and his compatriots not only saved the faltering American Revolution, but helped to give it new meaning.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:22 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Six months after the Declaration of Independence, America was nearly defeated. Then on Christmas night, George Washington led his men across the Delaware River to destroy the Hessians at Trenton. A week later Americans held off a counterattack, and in a brilliant tactical move, Washington crept behind the British army to win another victory. The momentum had reversed.… (more)

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