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Xtabentum: A Novel of Yucatan by Rosy…
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Xtabentum: A Novel of Yucatan

by Rosy Hugener

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Xtabentun, A Novel of Yucatan is an enjoyable quick read, if you can ignore grammatical errors (some sentences have to be read twice to catch the meaning). The author Rosy, Hugener, sprinkles in enough Mayan folklore to peak the reader’s interest. Some of the descriptions are creative. The story line is believable and it draws the reader into the book. Mexico’s turbulent history and the struggle of its indigenous peoples are presented in a palatable way. All in all it is a good book. ( )
1 vote ElizabethBraun | Apr 13, 2011 |
This book is a must read. Not only does it share a touching story about a quest to discover a families history but it provides a historical picture of Yucatan. The author pulls the reader in from the start and provides a book that is hard to put down. I enjoyed the authors ability to pull the Mexican and American cultures together. Although the author does not provide a clear ending to the families search it does provide for the reader wanting more and allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions about life and what is important. I highly recommend this book
added by Rosymex | editAmazon, KM Pellet (Mar 25, 2012)
 
Xtabentum: A Novel Of Yucatan is a story set in a period of history known to few Americans. It is refreshing to read a story from an author who has intimate knowledge of both Mexican and American culture, and Rosy Hugener has woven a fiction that neither vilifies nor lionizes either culture, but rather explores the reality of how both peoples have interacted over most of the twentieth century. With our continued and growing relationship with the peoples of Mexico, stories such as Xtabentum: A Novel Of Yucatan can only help increase our understanding and respect for our neighbors to the south. In addition to being rewarded with a fine and intriguing love story, the reader will enjoy a lesson in the history of this fascinating land and people, and hopefully come away with a new respect and appreciation for this fine and rich culture. Xtabentum is a must-read for anyone interested in Mexico and Mexican culture.
added by Rosymex | editAmzon, Horst Jhon C (Feb 2, 2012)
 
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According to Mayan legend, the Xtabentum flower that grows wild on the Yucatan peninsula first appeared on the grave of a free-spirited young woman who was scorned for her passion by the people of her village, but loved by the gods for her kind heart.

Xtabentum: A Novel of Yucatan is a story of two young women set in the years following the Mexican Revolution in Merida, Yucatan, one of the wealthiest cities in the world at the time. Amanda Diaz is from the “divine caste,” a small group of families of European descent who dominate the politics and economy of the region. Amanda’s lifelong friend, Carmen, is from the opposite end of the social spectrum, a Mayan Indian who is the daughter of one of the Diaz family servants. Against the true historical background of rebellion and assassination in the unstable country, the whipping of Carmen by a Diaz neighbor exposes the sheltered existence of the two women and drives them apart.

The story follows Amanda through her horror at the social injustice of the two-class Mexico to the sacrifices she makes in the name of friendship. Parts of the story take place in modern times, where the discovery of an old birth certificate sets Amanda’s granddaughter in search of a secret about her father’s birth. Her search, told in the first person, is blended with a third-person account of the lives of Amanda and her contemporaries in the 1920s.
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