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De val by Michael Connelly
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Member:Boekenbeestje
Title:De val
Authors:Michael Connelly
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The Drop by Michael Connelly

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Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
I absolutely love Mr. Connelly's books. Harry Bosch makes it so "Everybody counts, or nobody counts". This story starts with Bosch getting an extention on his return to the open unsolved unit in LA. But the first case he is assigned to comes at a specific request from Irvin Irving. Irving used to be the chief of police that headed Bosch's department and they clashed many times. So why would Irving ask for him when there is already bad blood between them?
The open unsolved unit also takes cold cases and opens them up for review. One such case is of a murder and dump of a 19yr old named Lily Price. The weird thing about this is a small drop of blood points DNA evidence to an 8yr old boy. An 8yr old taking and murdering a 19yr old girl doesn't make sense. This is what Bosch needs to figure out. ( )
  selinalynn69 | Aug 19, 2014 |
Bosch is still working cold cases and one comes up that looks like it might be a s case of lab contamination. As soon as this case comes up he gets pulled into an active case due to his old nemesis Irving asking him to work the death of his son. Bosch solves both cases but there are no easy endings in either case and one will certainly be brought up in the next book. Or at least I hope it will be.
( )
  Glennis.LeBlanc | Jul 8, 2014 |
I think this is my 3rd Connelly novel, but first in the Bosch series. (Although it is like the 15th Bosch novel.) I have mixed feelings about Connelly. I loved the first book I read, but was utterly dismayed when the second book had the same plot line, just different character names. I abhor formulaic books (For those of you who know my love of formulaic crime television shows--I admit it, I am contradicting myself. I can't help it. I like what I like.).

So I am happy to report that it has either been long enough since I read Connelly that I didn't remember the formula, or that this book does a good job of standing on it's own. I did this as an audio book, and I think that is a good way to ingest this book. However the narrator had a habit of changing his voice to differentiate characters, for me this wasn't as good as just reading it (some of the characters were so nasally voiced I wanted to skip ahead in the book).

Overall not a bad read, and you don't have to know books 1-14 to understand this one. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Synopsis/blurb......
When evidence links a brutal murder in 1989 to a convicted rapist named Clayton Pell, the case should be water-tight. Pell's DNA was found on the victim - but he was only eight years old at the time.
This not the only mystery Harry Bosch has to solve. A man jumped - or was pushed - from a window. The victim's father is Councilman Irving, who's been intent on destroying Harry's career for years. Now Irving wants Harry to head up the investigation.
Harry uncovers traces of two of the city's deepest secrets: a killer operating for as many as three decades without being detected, and a conspiracy that goes back into the dark history of the police department ...
Throughout my 20 plus years as a crime fiction reader, I’ve encountered many a detective that I have admired. I’ve followed the progress of their investigations, marvelling at their skills and intuition; the ability to dissect the various strands of evidence and point themselves in the next logical direction; their empathy for the victims and their families; their tenacity in pursuing their case; their courage and bravery in facing physical danger and their character and backbone much needed to withstand the interference and pressures from those higher up the food chain, often running in tandem with a hostile media and angry public. Of all the detectives I’ve read about, Connelly’s creation Harry Bosch is definitely my favourite. (If anyone decided to murder my skinny ass.....ok it’s not skinny....he’s the guy I want seconded to the Bedfordshire police to head up the investigation.)
In The Drop, Harry runs two enquiries. He has an open unsolved case over twenty years old where the DNA evidence points to a suspect, who already has convictions for sex offences but who was a young boy when the crime was committed.
His second case is an investigation that sees him cross paths with his nemesis, Councilman Irving. Irving’s son has fallen from a seventh storey window at a hotel and he wants Bosch to establish the truth of the matter; suicide, accident or murder.
Connelly skilfully weaves together the investigation into the two crimes, which Bosch runs concurrently, despite being pressured by the brass upstairs and Irving to prioritise the Councilman’s son’s death. Bosch resists Irving’s attempts to control his enquiry and delves deeper into the background of George Irving’s business dealings and marriage, uncovering possible corruption in City Hall and Irvin Irving’s alleged involvement in feathering his son’s nest.
Harry’s cold case sees him gain a romantic attachment with a sex therapist who is counselling his major suspect, whilst harbouring her own secrets regarding her fractured family. Bosch also contends with a working partner, Chu who he doesn’t fully trust and as a consequence finds Chu’s resentment at his treatment deflecting his focus from the investigations. His teenage daughter also occupies a lot of his thoughts, as he continues to construct and nurture a relationship with her after the death of her mother several years ago. All the while, the clock runs down on his tenure with the police department and he considers life on the outside.
Having struggled to enjoy Connelly’s last few books with the exception of The Fifth Witness, I was delighted to read this offering. Back on form and attains the heights of some of his earlier work.
5 from 5......and an early contender for April’s book of the month.
I picked up my copy late last year whilst casing some charity shop book stocks.


( )
  col2910 | Apr 17, 2014 |
Love the Bosch books and this was back on form. ( )
  infjsarah | Mar 30, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 53 (next | show all)
No readers of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch novels doubts Bosch’s superiority as an LAPD homicide investigator. Where we’ve questioned Bosch over the years has been in the rest of his life roles. As a father, husband, friend and boyfriend, he has frequently revealed himself as a bust in the previous 14 Bosch books. But that perception changes with the new book. In The Drop, Bosch emerges as a freshly mature fellow.

It’s his 15-year-old daughter who seems to have made the difference (though some might say of Bosch, who is approaching 60, what took him so long to grow up?). Maddie moved in with Bosch two years ago after her mother was killed in Nine Dragons (2009). Bosch has turned into an alert and nervous father, constantly on the phone to his daughter. For her part, the kid is a gem. She’s far more technologically adept than her father and helps him past tricky computer problems. Her influence works further on him in ways she might not suspect; it’s her mere presence that keeps Bosch from drinking at home and influences him to settle for a glass or two of wine everywhere else.

At LA’s new Police Administration Building, Bosch works with the unit handling cold cases, and as The Drop opens, he and his partner are assigned to a 1989 rape-murder case that comes to life with a curious new clue. Ordinarily, this case, with much promise of twists and turns to come, would be enough to fill a satisfying Bosch book. But, still in the opening pages of the new novel, Bosch gets orders from the chief of police to add a second, non-cold case to his list.

The case’s crime, as hot as the day’s headlines, involves a prominent LA businessman who either jumped or was shoved from the Chateau Marmont’s penthouse. Worse news for Bosch is that the deceased’s father is Bosch’s mortal enemy, former LAPD deputy chief Irvin Irving. The situation places Harry in the awkward middle of a piece of “high jingo,” his phrase for dirty police politics.

Moving through this intense double story, Michael Connelly is at the top of his game. So is Bosch. So, for that matter, is Maddie.
added by VivienneR | editThe Toronto Star, Jack Batten (Jan 14, 2012)
 
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Christmas came once a month in the Open-Unsolved Unit.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0316069418, Hardcover)

Amazon Best Books of the Month, December 2011: With his retirement looming, LAPD's Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch takes on two seemingly unrelated cases. The first is a botched DNA test from a 1989 rape and murder, which has been pinned on a convicted rapist who was only eight years old at the time of the crime. Harry's pursuit of that case is interrupted by the apparent suicide of a councilman's son. A former police chief and no fan of Harry's, the councilman insists that Harry investigate his son's death. In pursuit of the truth, and an elusive killer, Bosch and his partner uncover secrets and a political conspiracy deep within the police department. Connelly's aging hero is a flawed, haunted, and unforgettable character; his creator is a master craftsman. --Neal Thompson

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:00:03 -0400)

Detective Harry Bosch investigates a cold case and the murder of a city councilman's son. The cases are unrelated but they twist around each other like the double helix of a DNA strand. One leads to the discovery of a killer operating in the city for as many as three decades; the other to a deep political conspiracy that reached back into the dark history of the police department.… (more)

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