HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Freedom's Sword by J. R. Tomlin
Loading...

Freedom's Sword (edition 2011)

by J. R. Tomlin

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
10825111,760 (3.76)2
Member:Betty30554
Title:Freedom's Sword
Authors:J. R. Tomlin
Info:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2011), Paperback, 250 pages
Collections:2013 Challenge, Read, reviewed & rated, Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:None

Work details

Freedom's Sword: A Novel of Scotland by J.R. Tomlin

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
[[J. R. Tomlin]] has been writing epic fantasy for a good while, but, from what I can tell, is recently making forays into historical fiction. [A Kingdom's Cost] was the first book written in the Black Douglas trilogy, and was an exciting, engrossing read. James Douglas' father sent him to France to keep him safe from England's King Edward I, aka Longshanks. Soon after his arrival in London, he witnesses and is profoundly affected by the execution of William Wallace, strengthening his resolve to take back Scotland from the English.

[Freedom's Sword] is the prequel to the story of James Douglas. Tomlin takes the reader back some years to the rise of William Wallace and the early days of Robert the Bruce. A little-known figure, Andrew de Moray, is knighted by Scotland's King John de Balliol, goes into a battle the Scots lose, and gets captured by the English. Typical teenager that he is, he is unable to keep quiet in the face of his captors. King Edward and his minions find nothing "precocious" in young Andrew's outspokenness, causing young Andrew to be taken to perhaps the worst dungeon in all of England. He escapes, returns to his home, and proceeds to show the occupying English exactly what he thinks of their "expansion plans." He escapes, returns home, brings hope and renewed resolve to his people, and the battle begins. I must stop here, or risk giving the away the ending to the non-English-history-expert readers.

[Freedom's Sword]'s storyline is orderly, cohesive, concise - there is no jumping back and forth in time as seems to be popular now. Tomlin seems to adhere to historical accuracy, and I appreciate the "Historical Notes" and citations included.

As in [A Kingdom's Cost], the characters in this story are developed very well. The reader easily learns the relevant backgrounds and understands the motivations of the main historical characters. In Andrew de Moray, the young knight is an impetuous, hotheaded youth who becomes, in a very short time, a deliberating, calculating war strategist who keeps his family life separate from his work.

Tomlin's skill is quite evident in the writing of [Freedom's Sword]. Vivid descriptions tell of the battles with sound and fury, of the surface features of the land seen from the eyes of the warrior, of the scents and sounds and sceneries of a young man's more innocent days. The story flows so seamlessly that I often lost track of chapter counts. Editing was thorough and as complete as I have seen in too long of a time.

It is definitely one I will read again. ( )
  Betty30554 | Jan 16, 2013 |
I got this for free from Amazon.com. I don't know the accuracy of the history. The book not only brought out the experiences of the nobles but also the common people. There were comments on the English drive to conquer other people and the importance to the Scots to have their freedom. I read the book on my Kindle which made it easier for me to look up Medieval terms. There is a map of Scotland at the beginning but that is difficult to use with a Kindle. At the end of the book is a brief summary of the historical period, a list of historical characters, and the author's description of what were historical facts (and the source) and what was historical fiction in the book. I enjoy reading historical fiction and really appreciate it when authors include this information. ( )
1 vote Alice_Wonder | Oct 28, 2012 |
Freedom's Sword was really an exciting read. Though there was some word choice and grammatical errors which took me out of the story, it was overall a well-constructed, well-written, exciting book. For those who are into history,
action, and military fiction, you'll love it!

This book was provided free in exchange for a review. ( )
1 vote Jon.Roemer | Jan 26, 2012 |
Very interesting and absorbing book about Scottish History during the war with Longshanks of England. Shows the hopes and brutality of the times. Very well written and exciting book, a very good read. ( )
1 vote roadway2000 | Jan 5, 2012 |
As I am a big lover of Scottish history I was really looking forward to reading this novel and i wasn't disappointed. It focuses on a person in Scottish history is is often overlooked: Andrew De Moray. He is overlooked by historians and historical fiction writers because he was around at the same time as Robert De Bruce but it can be argued, and indeed is in this fine novel, that De Morary had more of an impact than Bruce, although Bruce became King of the Scots. This is a book that kept me reading for hours without wanting to turn it off (reading the kindle version). I thought it was extremely well researched by the author. It was a believable story weaving fiction with fact. II now look forward to reading the second installment of this series suspecting that the next one will be just as good...maybe even better. ( )
1 vote Janine2011 | Nov 28, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Before William Wallace... before Robert the Bruce... there was another Scottish hero...

In 1296, newly knighted by the King of the Scots, Andrew de Moray fights to defend his country against the forces of the ruthless invader, King Edward Longshanks of England. After a bloody defeat in battle, he is dragged in chains to an English dungeon. 

Soon the young knight escapes. He returns to find Scotland under the heel of a conqueror and his betrothed sheltering in the hills of the Black Isle. Seizing his own castle, he raises the banner of Scottish freedom. Now he must lead the north of Scotland to rebellion in hope of defeating the English army sent to crush them.

[retrieved 8/24/2013 from Amazon.com]
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

LibraryThing Author

J.R. Tomlin is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.76)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 8
3.5 5
4 9
4.5 2
5 4

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,624,081 books! | Top bar: Always visible