HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Carnival at Candlelight by Mary Pope Osborne
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,161106,993 (3.84)3

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
In my opinion this is a very good book. The writing language that the author used was very descriptive and it allowed me to paint a picture in my head of whatever it was he was describing. The lion’s stone mane ruffled into a mass of shaggy fur, his stone back softened into a sleek golden coat, and his stone wings stretched into long luminous feathers are just a few examples of the descriptive language that the author used throughout the text. I also enjoyed the plot of the story. Jack and Annie found themselves in many jams that seemed impossible to escape but they were able to. When they were thrown into jail with the rats I wondered how they would get out and they were able to escape with a magical rhyme. The book of rhymes got them out of a few impossible situations. There was always something new to be discovered around every corner like them having to figure out who was the Grand Lady of the Lagoon, or how they would find Neptune who was not real. Overall the plot was well organized. The message of this story is when using your imagination you anything is possible. ( )
  vbarbe1 | Apr 9, 2014 |
This was a rather interesting story. I like it when they investigate obscure historical periods. Everyone does Medieval England, or Viking Scandinavia. Not a whole lot of people look at early Renaissance Venice. Also, the selkie rhymes are such a lazy cop-out. Might as well say abracadabra. ( )
  benuathanasia | Sep 5, 2012 |
Genre: Informational, Fantasy

Media: Graphite pencil
  etimmons08 | Mar 31, 2012 |
i like the lion ( )
  cindyzhou2010 | May 2, 2011 |
Jack and Annie go to Venice Italy where they are having a thing called Carnival. Carnival is actually something like a circus. But when the water is going to flood the city Jack and Annie are the only ones who are going to save the day. I recommend this book to people who really really really want to go to Venice, Italy. ( )
  Zacswic | Dec 10, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Gail Hockman, of course
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375830340, Paperback)

MERLIN HAS ASKED Jack and Annie to help on another Merlin Mission. This time they head back into history to Venice, Italy. With the help of a research book, a book of magic rhymes, and a set of mysterious instructions from Merlin, the heroes will save the beautiful city from a flood! Here’s another Magic Tree House book that will engage kids with history, magic, and nonstop action from beginning to end.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:29:07 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

While on a mission to prove to Merlin that they can use magic wisely, Jack and Annie travel to seventeenth-century Venice, Italy, to save the city from disaster.

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
184 avail.
30 wanted
3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.84)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 5
2.5 2
3 12
3.5 4
4 13
4.5
5 21

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 94,393,379 books! | Top bar: Always visible