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The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi
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The Drowned Cities

by Paolo Bacigalupi

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Ship Breaker (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8586416,063 (3.85)62
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    grizzly.anderson: Both books extrapolate on current social and political trends to produce a dystopian future.
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» See also 62 mentions

English (63)  French (1)  All languages (64)
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
I really liked what Bacigalupi did with this book. He did an excellent job of creating a future dystopian world set in what is now the United States that is really not much different than what is going on in other parts of the world today. In the case of The Drowned Cities, the issues he explores are climate change, children forced to become soldiers, and the politics of regions run by warring warlords. The attitude of the Peacekeepers (Chinese in this case) towards the local populations was a great commentary on how Western countries affect conflicts in our world today. The characters were great and their stories spoke to the tragedy of the situation they find themselves in. Although the story was very grim and the author did not shy away from the horrible parts of war, there was a bit of hope at the end. I hope that the author writes more about this world. ( )
  Cora-R | Jul 31, 2019 |
I really liked what Bacigalupi did with this book. He did an excellent job of creating a future dystopian world set in what is now the United States that is really not much different than what is going on in other parts of the world today. In the case of The Drowned Cities, the issues he explores are climate change, children forced to become soldiers, and the politics of regions run by warring warlords. The attitude of the Peacekeepers (Chinese in this case) towards the local populations was a great commentary on how Western countries affect conflicts in our world today. The characters were great and their stories spoke to the tragedy of the situation they find themselves in. Although the story was very grim and the author did not shy away from the horrible parts of war, there was a bit of hope at the end. I hope that the author writes more about this world. ( )
  Cora-R | May 21, 2019 |
Usually the first volume is a bang and the rest of series are weaker and weaker echoes. This is not the case with The Drowned Cities, the second volume of The Ship Breaker trilogy (the final (?) volume is expected in the Fall of 2017). For me, it is much stronger in terms of characters, world-setting and raw emotions generated by the novel.
First of all, the heroes are different – main protagonists of the first volume are gone, only one character remains – augumented human Tool, the rest are completely new characters. Secondly, while life of ship scavengers was hard and dangerous, here we meet much worse – one of the main protagonists, Mehlia is an outcast, hated by people for what she cannot change – she is a daughter of a Chinese peacekeeper (who tried a humanitarian mission but failed) and one-handed – her situation is notably worse than that of Nailor from the first volume. Thirdly, the book has a great ad horrifying depiction of boy-solders, teenagers with guns and high on drugs, who can cut you down just because you look strange or because they are bored. At the same time, they are not an unfathomable evil for heroes to fight – actually a notable part of narrative are made by them and this is very powerful.
The Great book, highly recommended.
( )
  Oleksandr_Zholud | Jan 9, 2019 |
Just because two books by an author are the same genre, that doesn't make them companion novels. Ship Breaker was enjoyable, but the only thing it has in common with The Drowned Cities is that they both take place in future America. As for the actual story, I was drawn in by the beginning, but someplace a little past the middle, I began to grow bored. Mouse is given another name, but the author calls him Mouse until a ceratin point, when calling him the other name is significant. He stay with the second name for a few pages, then randomly switched between the two for no reason at all. There was no romance, which surprised me. I'm happy not only with the lack of romance, but also with the fact that the author refused to bow down to the expectations of YA fiction. The book was okay, but I'd prefer a sequel to Ship Breaker.

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  captainbooknerd | Jan 11, 2018 |
Brutal, bleak and confronting in places. Wonderful and compelling world with some surprisingly likeable characters. ( )
  brakketh | Aug 14, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
The Drowned Cities is an adventure story, a thriller and a sharply drawn fable about the state of the world today. It succeeds handily on all three fronts
added by 4leschats | editBook Page, Heather Seggel (May 1, 2012)
 
Beautifully written, filled with high-octane action, and featuring badly damaged but fascinating and endearing characters, this fine novel tops its predecessor and can only increase the author's already strong reputation.
added by 4leschats | editPublishers Weekly (pay site) (Mar 12, 2012)
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Paolo Bacigalupiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Foster, JonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Swanson, JoshuaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For my father
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Chains clanked in the darkness of the holding cells.
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In a dark future America that has devolved into unending civil wars, orphans Mahlia and Mouse barely escape the war-torn lands of the Drowned Cities, but their fragile safety is soon threatened and Mahlia will have to risk everything if she is to save Mouse, as he once saved her.

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