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Season of the Sandstorms by Mary Pope…
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Season of the Sandstorms

by Mary Pope Osborne

Other authors: Sal Murdocca (Illustrator)

Series: Magic Tree House (34), Merlin Mission (6)

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1,468185,085 (3.78)3

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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
Armed only with a research book and a book of magic rhymes, Jack and Annie go back 1,200 years to the Golden Age of Baghdad.
  jhawn | Jul 31, 2017 |
- In book #34 of Mary Pope Osborne’s Magic Tree House series, Jack and Annie go back all the way back to Mesopotamia during the ancient times and ancient Baghdad. Their task is to “journey back to Baghdad of long ago and help the caliph spread wisdom to the world.” After reading the letter from Merlin, along with other instructions, they are taken back in time through the book, The Golden Age of Baghdad. When they arrive at their destination, they are in the middle of a desert. They soon meet up with a band of merchants and one of the traders gives them a valuable item. Jack and Annie are tasked with returning a lost treasure to its rightful owner. I read one of Mary Pope Osborne’s books from the Magic Tree House series a couple years back for a class project. The book was very easy to follow and was interesting. That book was The Civil War on Sunday. That book along with this book had several historical facts and events that happened. This would be a good novel study to learn about ancient Mesopotamia and how the people of that are lived during ancient times.
  dennehycm32 | Feb 24, 2017 |
GR: N
GL: 2.3
DRA: 30
Lexile: 580L
  Infinityand1 | Aug 3, 2016 |
I liked the “Season of the Sandstorms” for many reasons. The plot of the story was very intriguing and suspenseful, making it hard to put down the book. The plot of the story is for the main characters, Jack and Annie is to “spread wisdom to the world”. Also I like how the author embedded history into the story. There are parts of the story that were nonfiction material that gave accurate detail about various events in history. For example, in the text it said “In the ninth century, traders from all over the world brought their goods to Baghdad to sell”. The story message is to show that books and wisdom is powerful. ( )
  eranda2 | Feb 15, 2016 |
This is the first Magic Tree House book I have ever read. I can see why these books are so intriguing to children who wants a simple, yet enticing chapter book to read. This story takes them on an adventure to Baghdad, Iraq, which is the main reason why I picked up this story. I have not seen any other fiction book about Iraq in our library. In a time where this country has a negative rapport, this story proposes an opposing view. Jack and Annie travel to the city, and find it to be different from the life they are used to, and they want to find out more. The siblings wanting to explore the town but not having the time to leaves you wanting to know more about the bustling city.
I would use this book to spark a discussion on how different countries, and even different cities are different from our own, and may have different things that they do everyday. I would prompt students to write about what they would do if they had one day in Baghdad. The story tells about many of the activities that were going on around the city, and I would have students pick at least 3 things to do during the day. For students who need more of a challenge, I would let them do some research to find another activity that they would like to do during their adventure to Baghdad. ( )
  MareeTos | Jan 19, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mary Pope Osborneprimary authorall editionscalculated
Murdocca, SalIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Book description
Jack and Annie travel back in time to a desert in the Middle East at the behest of Merlin who has given them a rhyme to help on their mission. There they meet a Bedouin tribe and learn about the way that they live. From camel rides and oases to ancient writings and dangerous sandstorms, here’s another Magic Tree House filled with all the mystery, history, magic, and old-fashioned adventure that kids love to read about.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375830324, Paperback)

Jack and Annie travel back in time to a desert in the Middle East at the behest of Merlin who has given them a rhyme to help on their mission. There they meet a Bedouin tribe and learn about the way that they live. From camel rides and oases to ancient writings and dangerous sandstorms, here’s another Magic Tree House filled with all the mystery, history, magic, and old-fashioned adventure that kids love to read about.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:34 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Guided by a magic rhyme, Jack and Annie travel to ancient Baghdad on a mission to help the Caliph disseminate wisdom to the world.

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