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The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the…
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The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural

by Patricia McKissack, J. Brian Pinkney (Illustrator)

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The Dark-Thirty by Patricia C.
For this novel Patricia C. McKissack put together series of storytelling that can usually be told around bonfires. This is not just any story telling its stories that are suspense and can possibly bring fear into a reader eyes. This book contains ten stories that shows racism, haunting, and vengeance that is appropriate to tell around camp fires. The author not only put series of stories in one book but, brought the setting back to the era of slavery. These stories are not written from the author’s ideas. These are chilling stories from the original stories rooted in African-American history. This novel also was awarded with the Coretta Scott King award in 1993.

These are collection of ghost stories that used to be told through storytelling. The title to start off with is “The Dark Thirty” meaning half hour before sunset. It is very interesting titles because that title is believe to be the time when ghost exist. This book tells ghost stories from slavery era. The unique thing about this book for example the story “We Organized” is written very well. The narrating of the story is read from a slave perspective. The way this story is written like an uneducated slave with slang and stuttering. However, it is a cool way to tell a story a readers mind can really picture a former slave voice. These stories are really something to read around Dark-Thirty.

Paris Edwards ( )
  Paris_E | May 9, 2013 |
The 1993 Newbery Honor book blends tales of the supernatural with the terror of racial prejudice. In a series of short stories, the author teaches history in a simple way that does not preach, but rather, brings home a message of the need for tolerance. ( )
  Whisper1 | Sep 13, 2012 |
Intermediate or Middle
Genre: Folktale- This was a folktale because all of these stories were stories told to Patricia Mckissack from her grandpa when she was little.
Plot: The plot of one story was man vs. nature. He was born with a curse that he could see the future, but the future was not always beautiful and bright. He would see horrible things sometimes.
  Arianna21 | Nov 23, 2010 |
I like the short story format because it is easy to pick up and read throughout the day. Some stories, like the Legen of Pin Oak, had enough detail for me to feel as though I understood the purpose of the story. However, other stories like the 11:59 felt like details were omitted in order to keep with the short story format. It was very frustrating reading about some of the ways African Americans were treated and I felt some anger as I read about that treatment. ( )
  Nhritzuk | Nov 21, 2010 |
Book Description: Nr Fine condition. Signed by first owner on first page. Edges just a hint of wear. Text clean and tight. Illustrated by Brian Pinkney.

On the inside of the front cover, there are facsimiles of the signatures of both the author and the illustrator. A nice clean book
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Czrbr | Jun 7, 2010 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Patricia McKissackprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pinkney, J. BrianIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679818634, Hardcover)

These 10 spine-tinglers range from straight-up ghost stories to eerie narratives. The tales in this winner of the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award depict racism, haunting and vengeance in a manner that can be read out loud around a campfire or savored privately, offering middle readers (fourth through eighth graders) thoughtful exposure to important, though frightening, historical themes. One tale, set in the segregated South of the 1940s, tells of a black man's ghost avenging his murder by a white klansman. McKissack's prose is smooth and understated, and its sense of foreboding is powerfully enhanced by Brian Pinkney's black-and-white scratch board illustrations.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:17:49 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

A collection of ghost stories with African American themes, designed to be told during the Dark Thirty--the half hour before sunset--when ghosts seem all too believable.

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