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There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by…
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There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (original 1997; edition 1999)

by Simms Taback

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1,7721513,970 (4.06)10
Member:jourdan922
Title:There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly
Authors:Simms Taback
Info:Scholastic (1999), Paperback, 32 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:old lady, animals, eating

Work details

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Simms Taback (1997)

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» See also 10 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 151 (next | show all)
I love this book so much, reading it as an adult brought back so many memories. This book is about an old lady who swallows a fly along with other animals. She swallows a lot of different insects and animals to catch one another. The pictures are colorful and keep you engaged. I thought it was gross and funny that she kept eating and eating until she couldn't anymore. I recommend this book as a read aloud for second, third, and fourth graders. ( )
  Sthefania | Feb 20, 2017 |
Summary:
There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Fly is a colorful story about as the title would suggest, an old lady who swallowed a fly. After swallowing the fly, the old lady then proceeds to swallow a spider in hopes that the spider will catch the fly. The story continues with her swallowing various animals to catch the previous animal such as a cat, a dog, a cow, so on and so forth; until at last there is no more room in her stomach.

Personal Reaction:
This is old poem, that I remember reading as a child. The illustrations of this particular version, provide an enhancing interaction to the text of the story. Without the illustrations, the story wouldn’t have the same humor as it does. I love being able to read stories that I enjoyed as a child to my own children, and watch their reactions to them. My son who is five and a typical boy, thinks that this story is gross and awesome at the same time; it’s one that I have to read over and over again before calling it a night.

Extension Ideas:
There are so many fun activities that you can do to go with this story, as well as different lessons. I plan to use this book as a way to teach the concept of sequencing. After reading the story to the kids, I will have cut out pictures of the various animals that the old lady eats, and as a class we will have to place them in chronological order of what got eaten first. Kids love this story, and it sure to get them laughing, and a great activity to do afterwards, is to cut out pictures from magazines that they themselves would swallow. These can be funny or realistic items, but after the children have cut out the pictures, they will glue them on to their makeshift stomachs that I’ll have for them, and we will place them around the classroom for the children and for visitors to see.
  KaylaRoseDyer | Feb 12, 2017 |
This book was not my favorite. I think it is a little too dark for children under the third grade to that it why i tagged it grades 3-6. I did not really get the point of this story nor do I understand why it would win a prize but I guess I can say that I enjoyed the illustrations. They were bright and very colorful. However, I still did not like the wording of this book. ( )
  bbrelet | Feb 7, 2017 |
This book is a good fantasy because of the humorous rhyming and engaging images provided. The plot is humorous and the conflict causes children to be concerned about the old lady eating all of the animals. The animals continue to grow bigger and bigger, as well as the lady who becomes fatter and fatter. ( )
  mcortner15 | Feb 5, 2017 |
This book is told like a song about an old woman who continues to swallow large animals in order to catch the one she swallowed before that one. The spider and the fly are mentioned on each page, unlike the other animals. The word pattern that is used throughout the book that children can catch onto is, "Perhaps she'll die." This book is fun for kids to read and make predictions about what is to come next. ( )
  MeaganBilski | Feb 3, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 151 (next | show all)
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Book description
Modeled on the folk song: There was an old lady who swallowed a fly.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670869392, Hardcover)

An old favorite as you've never seen it before!

Everyone knows the song about the old lady who swallowed a fly, a spider, a bird, and even worse, but who's ever seen what's going on inside the old lady's stomach? With this inventive die-cut artwork, Simms Tabak gives us a rollicking, eye-popping version of the well-loved poem.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:05 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Presents the traditional version of a famous American folk poem first heard in the U.S. in the 1940's with illustrations on die-cut pages that reveal all that the old lady swallows.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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