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Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
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Sharp Objects

by Gillian Flynn

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
6,610431991 (3.74)1 / 398
Returning to her hometown after an eight-year absence to investigate the murders of two girls, reporter Camille Preaker is reunited with her neurotic mother and enigmatic, thirteen-year-old half-sister as she works to uncover the truth about the killings.
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English (423)  Dutch (5)  Danish (1)  German (1)  French (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (432)
Showing 1-5 of 423 (next | show all)
Fun read. Disturbing story! That was fun but oh so predictable ( )
  jzw908 | Jun 3, 2020 |
Clever, tense, vividly crazy characters. A thriller with a brain. Really enjoyed it! ( )
  nancyjean19 | Jun 3, 2020 |
To understand a Gillian Flynn novel is to understand her writing process:

"Libraries are filled with stories on generations of brutal men, trapped in a cycle of aggression. I wanted to write about the violence of women. So I did. I wrote a dark, dark book. A book with a narrator who drinks too much, screws too much, and has a long history of slicing words into herself. With a mother who’s the definition of toxic, and a thirteen-year-old half-sister with a finely honed bartering system for drugs, sex, control. In a small, disturbed town, in which two little girls are murdered. It’s not a particularly flattering portrait of women, which is fine by me. Isn’t it time to acknowledge the ugly side? I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines, brave rape victims, soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes (as if we had nothing more interesting to war over), not chilly WASP mothers (emotionally distant isn’t necessarily evil), not soapy vixens (merely bitchy doesn’t qualify either). I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some. The point is, women have spent so many years girl-powering ourselves — to the point of almost parodic encouragement — we’ve left no room to acknowledge our dark side. Dark sides are important. They should be nurtured like nasty black orchids."

Sharp Objects is a brilliant novel that epitomizes all the darkness and ugliness that humans are capable of. No wonder it's so divisive; Gillian writes to unsettle, to provoke. Sharp Object is my favorite of hers, although one really can't go wrong with any of Flynn's works. ( )
  hianbai | May 27, 2020 |
So unbelievable, it became ridiculous. ( )
  joannemonck | May 13, 2020 |
Reporter Camille Preaker returns home to cover the story of a missing teen nine months after another teen had been found murdered. Always having a rocky relationship with her mother, Camille finds herself staying at home with her mother, step-father and half-sister. Living there brings up the memories of her younger sister, who died in childhood, and reminders of that time period as she watches her mother with her half-sister. Digging for information on what turns out to be two murders in their small, close-knit community makes Camille deal with questions she long buried, leading to answers to questions she had always been too afraid to ask. It was a compelling read. ( )
  Susan.Macura | May 10, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 423 (next | show all)
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For my parents, Matt and Judith Flynn
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My sweater was new, stinging red and ugly.
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“The photo showed a dark-eyed girl with a feral grin and too much hair for her head. The kind of girl who’d be described by teachers as a ‘handful.’ I liked her.”
“Sometimes I think illness sits inside every woman, waiting for the right moment to bloom. I have known so many sick women all my life. Women with chronic pain, with ever-gestating diseases. Women with conditions. Men, sure, they have bone snaps, they have backaches, they have a surgery or two, yank out a tonsil, insert a shiny plastic hip. Women get consumed. Not surprising considering the sheer amount of traffic a woman’s body experiences.”
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Reporter Camille Preaker tries to unravel the truth of her own troubled past as she returns to her hometown to investigate the murders of two preteen girls.
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