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A Three Dog Life by Abigail Thomas
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A Three Dog Life (2006)

by Abigail Thomas

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9155814,623 (3.73)45

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» See also 45 mentions

English (56)  Dutch (2)  All languages (58)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
I'm noticing how my reaction to what I'm reading is tempered by what I have just read. I'm enjoying a stack of books I received as Christmas gifts, and so had just finished reading Making Toast, a memoir about personal tragedy striking someone my age and background; instead of bonding, I was uneasy with the preciousness of it. As I started off A Three Dog Life, I was reading through this lens of suspicion, and then, in the last chapters, this lovely author turned it around into a reflection of the aging process which did, indeed, touch home. ( )
  MaryHeleneMele | May 6, 2019 |
Sweet and poignant, but also gut-wrenchingly honest and realistic about Thomas' attempts to cope with her life after her husband's TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury). While out with their dog, he is hit by a car and never the same: his body recovers but his mind does not. His personality is erratic, his short term memory is impaired, and he is prone to rages. Thomas lovingly remembers her relationship with her husband and grieves for the man he used to be. She finds solace in her dogs (she adds two more to her home after the accident), her family and friends, knitting, reading, and writing.

I had never heard of Abigail Thomas before picking up this slim memoir at my local Half Price Books, but after I read the last page I immediately added more of her work to my Amazon wish list. Thomas' writing style (and subject matter!) reminds me of Joan Didion. I look forward to reading more of her work. ( )
  bookishblond | Oct 24, 2018 |
Best books 2006. LA times. Washington Post
Very enjoyable read about a very sad story. ( )
  mahallett | Dec 27, 2017 |
Short and sweet. This is a lovely book of one woman's struggle to come to terms with her husband's life changing brain injury. Clear sighted and touching, a lesson for us all. ( )
  njcur | Jul 15, 2017 |
"I feel like a tent that wants to be a kite, tugging at my stakes." ( )
  Yerk | Jun 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
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For Sally
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This is the one thing that stays the same: my husband got hurt.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0156033232, Paperback)

When Abigail Thomas’s husband, Rich, was hit by a car, his skull was shattered, his brain severely damaged. Subject to rages, terrors, and hallucinations—and with no memory of what he did the hour, the day, the year before—he was sent to live in a nursing facility that specializes in treating traumatic brain injuries. This tragedy is the ground on which Abigail had to build a new life. How she built that life is a story of great courage and change, of moving to a small country town, of a new family composed of three dogs, knitting, and friendship, of facing down guilt and discovering gratitude. It is also about her relationship with Rich, a man who lived in the eternal present, and the eerie poetry of his often uncanny perceptions. Hailed by Stephen King as "the best memoir I have ever read," this wise, plainspoken, beautiful book enacts the truth Abigail has discovered since the accident: You might not find meaning in disaster, but you might, with effort, make something useful of it.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:29 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

When Abigail Thomas's husband, Rich, was hit by a car, his brain shattered. Subject to rages, terrors, and hallucinations, he must live the rest of his life in an institution. He has no memory of what he did the hour, the day, the year before. This tragedy is the ground on which Abigail had to build a new life. How she built that life is a story of great courage and great change, of moving to a small country town, of a new family composed of three dogs, knitting, and friendship, of facing down guilt and discovering gratitude. It is also about her relationship with Rich, a man who lives in the eternal present, and the eerie poetry of his often uncanny perceptions.… (more)

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