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Extremes: A Retrieval Artist Novel (edition 2003)

by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

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203657,794 (3.83)10
Member:JaredMcLaine
Title:Extremes: A Retrieval Artist Novel
Authors:Kristine Kathryn Rusch
Info:Roc (2003), Mass Market Paperback, 384 pages
Collections:Audio Book, Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:Science-Fiction

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Extremes by Kristine Kathryn Rusch

Recently added bySandeman, Bugetta, martin.galese, galphin, private library, robjallen, kevbayer, NigelTB, ndmzero
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  1. 00
    Naked in Death by J.D. Robb (pmatson)
    pmatson: J.D. Robb's futuristic (2065+) police procedurals combine convincing world-building with a strong, complex protagonist. The first four books are excellent, and the rest of the series continues to please.
  2. 00
    The Patchwork Girl by Larry Niven (pmatson)
    pmatson: This is one of Niven's "Gil the Arm" SF mysteries, with a murder set on the moon. I think it's better than "Extremes."
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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
http://kammbia1.wordpress.com/2013/12/20/book-review-48-extremes-by-kristine-kat...

What happens when a rogue scientist decides she wants to kill an entire moon city with a virus in order to create her own version of a superhuman race? That question is the basic plot of Extremes by Kristine Kathryn Rusch. Extremes is the second novel in the multi-genre Retrieval Artist Series.

Miles Flint has become a retrieval artist after quitting the police force in the first book of the series, The Disappeared. Retrieval Artists are basically intergalactic bounty hunters that track down people who have disappeared in order to escape punishment from the human-alien societies created in this series. Most retrieval artists usually work outside of the law. But, Flint’s background as a detective and his strong moral compass has caused him to be conflicted as he works on his first assignment as a retrieval artist.

He is chosen by a major law firm to investigate a former retrieval artist work on tracking this rogue scientist, Frieda Tey. In the process, he comes across a murder at the moon marathon on the colony of Armstrong. Flint finds out his work for the law firm and the murder are connected. As a result, he meets up with his old partner, Noelle DeRicci, from the police force who is investigating the murder. The two work together to solve the case and begin to understand that there’s a new dynamic in their relationship now that Flint is a retrieval artist.

Extremes is another solid novel in the Retrieval Artist series that combines elements of traditional science-fiction and mystery into a genre gumbo I enjoyed reading. Rusch is an old fashioned storyteller where characters and plot both work together to create a solid story. No fancy or superfluous prose that distracts from the story. This novel was refreshing to read and I’m looking forward to reading and reviewing Consequences, book three of the series. Recommended. ( )
  Kammbia1 | Dec 21, 2013 |
A continuation of the Retrieval Artist series. These are people who for a fee and whatever other reason specialize in finding those who have been forced to seek out new identities to escape the law, often because they might have violated some obscure regulation of another planet. The book has three parallel points-of-view: Miles Flint, a retrieval artist, DiRicci, a cop investigating the murder of a marathon runner, and Oliviari, a “Tracker” who looks for people like a Retrieval Artist, but for very different reasons. It turns out, each is searching for the same person.

Rusch does a nice job of portraying the panic and fear that can result and the extremes to which the non-infected will go to protect themselves from the infected, including killing them. A Utilitarian’s wet-dream.

All this takes place on the moon, near a new city called Armstrong. Rusch’s alternate world is well-thought out with personal links, sophisticated computer connections, and a hostile environment outside the dome that surrounds Armstrong. Unlike her earlier work that focuses more on Flint and Paloma (his mentor) this one also has fewer aliens and the complex cultural interactions that force the need for retrieval artists and trackers. It’s more of a police procedural (not a negative) than the couple others I have read. I will be reading more. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
Good plot which builds and builds. ( )
  gregandlarry | Mar 27, 2012 |
A Little slow in the start, Rusch quickens the pace in the second half of the book.

The plot focuses on a death investigation at the 'Moon Marathon'

Reasonably solid SF Mystery. Not quite as good as the first book, but still moving things along.

A Good Try 3.5 Stars. ( )
  cosmicdolphin | Nov 1, 2010 |
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