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Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow by Faïza Guène
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Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow

by Faïza Guène

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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3872027,743 (3.3)23
  1. 00
    Random Deaths and Custard by Catrin Dafydd (wandering_star)
    wandering_star: Both these are smart, funny books told through the slangy voice of an observant and sharp teenage girl.
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» See also 23 mentions

English (16)  French (2)  Swedish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
A great book for learning French slang vocabulary, and also for seeing the world from the perspective of a teenage daughter of Moroccan parents living in a Parisian immigrant neighborhood. Her insights are pretty predictable and the story isn't that great, but I enjoyed the cultural experience. ( )
  theonetruesteph | Mar 30, 2013 |
Immigrants; North Africa; France ( )
  janebr | Aug 25, 2012 |
La vida d'una noia francesa, filla d'emigrants, que descriu la seva vida quotidiana. Un llibre interessant per diferent.
Molt bonica l'edició i amb moltes notes dels traductors. Ara, hi ha un munt de faltes d'ortografia, i fins i tot de puntuació, imperdonables. ( )
  Montserratmv | Mar 22, 2011 |
Doria lives with her mother in the Paris banlieue. She's an angry teenager: angry at her father for leaving them to go back to Morocco and find himself a peasant wife to bear him a son; angry at the lazy racism she and her mother encounter daily; angry at the social workers for pretending they understand and care. Fortunately for the reader, Doria's anger comes out as cynical wisecracks, which had me laughing out loud. But there are signs that some of this is just teenage bravado, and beneath that is a young woman who cares not just about her mother but also about her own future.

This was a sassy, energetic read which I really enjoyed. It's not perfect - sometimes the intention of the author shows through a bit too much (this bit's uplifting, this bit shows that Doria is smarter than she pretends to be), but hey, this is a first novel and Faïza Guène was only 19 when it was published, so I think those flaws are fairly minor. ( )
  wandering_star | Feb 28, 2010 |
Aquired via BookCrossing 04 Sep 2009 - Not So Secret Stationery parcel

This was brilliant! A fresh young voice; the author is from the Parisian inner city which she describes so well, and the writing is funny, heartfelt and moving. The translation is great and not at all clunky. Doria is an Algerian living with her Mum in a seedy tower block. Around them are other Algerians and a great collection of characters, aunties, spoddy cousin types, a well-meaning counsellor, the evil boss at her Mum's place. Both Doria and Yasmina grow and change during the book, both learning new skills and ways to deal with life. Although the banlieus have been written about depressingly and have been the scenes of terrible clashes and riots, this is basically a life-affirming and positive book, while not skirting the more serious issues. I'd love to read more by this author. ( )
  LyzzyBee | Jan 9, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Faïza Guèneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adams, SarahTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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C'est le lundi et comme tous les lundis, je suis allée chez Mme Burlaud.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0156030489, Paperback)

He thought I'd forged my mom's name on the slip. How stupid is that? On this thing Mom just made a kind of squiggly shape on the page. That jerk didn't even think about what he was saying, didn't even ask himself why her signature might be weird. He's one of those people who think illiteracy is like AIDS. It only exists in Africa.
--from Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow

 "A tale for anyone who has ever lived outside looking in, especially from that alien country called adolescence. A funny, heartfelt story from a wise guy who happens to be a girl. If you've ever fallen in love, if you've ever had your heart broken, this story is your story." -- Sandra Cisneros, author of THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET 

The Paradise projects are only a few metro stops from Paris, but here it's a whole different kind of France. Doria's father, the Beard, has headed back to their hometown in Morocco, leaving her and her mom to cope with their mektoub—their destiny—alone. They have a little help-- from a social worker sent by the city, a psychiatrist sent by the school, and a thug friend who recites Rimbaud.

It seems like fate’s dealt them an impossible hand, but Doria might still make a new life. She'll prove the projects aren't only about rap, soccer, and religious tension. She’ll take the Arabic word kif-kif (same old, same old) and mix it up with the French verb kiffer (to really like something). Now she has a whole new motto: KIFFE KIFFE TOMORROW.

"Moving and irreverent, sad and funny, full of rage and intelligence. [Guène's] characters are unforgettable, her voice fresh, and her book a delight." -- Laila Lalami, author of Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits

Faïza Guène, the child of Algerian immigrants, grew up in the public housing projects of Pantin, outside Paris. This is her first book.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:54:20 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"The Paradise projects are only a few metro stops from Paris, but here it's a whole different kind of France. Doria's father, the Beard, has headed back to their hometown in Morocco, leaving her and her mom to cope with their mektoub - their destiny - alone. They have a little help - from a social worker sent by the city, a psychiatrist sent by the school, and a thug friend who recites Rimbaud." "It seems like fate's dealt them an impossible hand, but Doria might still make a new life. She'll prove the projects aren't only about rap, soccer, and religious tension. She'll take the Arabic word kif-kif (same old, same old) and mix it up with the French verb kiffer (to really like something). And she'll have a whole new motto: Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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