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Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the…
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Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker (original 2011; edition 2012)

by Kevin Mitnick, Steve Wozniak (Foreword), William L. Simon (Contributor)

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7452418,764 (3.81)6
Member:paulmarculescu
Title:Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker
Authors:Kevin Mitnick
Other authors:Steve Wozniak (Foreword), William L. Simon (Contributor)
Info:Back Bay Books (2012), Paperback, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
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Ghost in the Wires: My Adventures as the World's Most Wanted Hacker by Kevin Mitnick (2011)

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Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
Dated but very interesting. I got kind of a brutal creep vibe, not from the social engineering, but from his interpersonal interactions, his explanations of dynamics that didn't seem authentic or maybe are conveniently explained, his enabling family, his simultaneous brutal treatment of "friends" and wounded hurt that they were not his friends. He also seems grandiose and a braggart. However, it is very artful how he did things whether you agree with his actions or enjoy the impression of his personality you get. It is hard to fathom the breadth of information he had, how he applied it in high pressure situations, and how like a chess player he often had to plan things in series of moves ahead. For those aspects, it is a very worthy read, and even for the creepy parts, it is informative.
  rosechimera | Mar 16, 2018 |
Dated but very interesting. I got kind of a brutal creep vibe, not from the social engineering, but from his interpersonal interactions, his explanations of dynamics that didn't seem authentic or maybe are conveniently explained, his enabling family, his simultaneous brutal treatment of "friends" and wounded hurt that they were not his friends. He also seems grandiose and a braggart. However, it is very artful how he did things whether you agree with his actions or enjoy the impression of his personality you get. It is hard to fathom the breadth of information he had, how he applied it in high pressure situations, and how like a chess player he often had to plan things in series of moves ahead. For those aspects, it is a very worthy read, and even for the creepy parts, it is informative.
  rosechimera | Mar 16, 2018 |
I was fascinated by Kevin's story, yet appalled at the same time.

He was clearly clever, hard-working, capable, yet he wasted all that ability on stupid pranks to access information which, according to him, he didn't benefit from in any way. The technical information went straight over my head, but the social side of what he did was interesting. He used technical knowledge and sheer confidence to talk people into giving him the access he needed. With the current concerns about cyber crime and identity theft, it was valuable to know just how frighteningly easy it is to talk people into giving out sensitive information. We could all learn a lot from reading this book!

The other thing that bothered me about Kevin? He kept saying how guilty he felt at the worry and grief he was causing his mother and grandmother, and he repeatedly promised them to stop, but didn't do so. He was either lying about his feelings for his family, or he was completely addicted to what he was doing.

Clearly a book like this is one-sided. Who knows how much of it is true? All the same, I would love to know what a psychiatrist would make of him!
( )
  robinia99 | Nov 18, 2017 |
Let me start off by saying that I'm surprised that Kevin doesn't need a wheelbarrow to help him walk around. He certainly has the biggest balls of anyone on this planet.

I think my rating would be different for different people. Do you know computers/coding/tech during the 80's & 90's? Then it is certainly 5 stars.
Are you comfortable with tech, but not obsessed? Then it's 4 stars.
Are you technologically illiterate? Then it's probably 3 to 3.5 stars.

It's an amazing story and worth the read. ( )
  beertraveler | Feb 5, 2016 |
I thought stuff like this happened only in movies. Probably the best non-fiction thriller I have read since I stopped reading fiction a long long time ago.
  danoomistmatiste | Jan 24, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kevin Mitnickprimary authorall editionscalculated
Simon, William L.Contributormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Wozniak, SteveForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316037702, Hardcover)

Kevin Mitnick was the most elusive computer break-in artist in history. He accessed computers and networks at the world's biggest companies--and however fast the authorities were, Mitnick was faster, sprinting through phone switches, computer systems, and cellular networks. He spent years skipping through cyberspace, always three steps ahead and labeled unstoppable. But for Kevin, hacking wasn't just about technological feats-it was an old fashioned confidence game that required guile and deception to trick the unwitting out of valuable information.

Driven by a powerful urge to accomplish the impossible, Mitnick bypassed security systems and blazed into major organizations including Motorola, Sun Microsystems, and Pacific Bell. But as the FBI's net began to tighten, Kevin went on the run, engaging in an increasingly sophisticated cat and mouse game that led through false identities, a host of cities, plenty of close shaves, and an ultimate showdown with the Feds, who would stop at nothing to bring him down.

Ghost in the Wires is a thrilling true story of intrigue, suspense, and unbelievable escape, and a portrait of a visionary whose creativity, skills, and persistence forced the authorities to rethink the way they pursued him, inspiring ripples that brought permanent changes in the way people and companies protect their most sensitive information.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:30 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The world's most famous former computer hacker, now a security consultant, describes his life on the run from the FBI creating fake identities, finding jobs at a law firm and a hospital, and keeping tabs on his pursuers.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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