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The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith
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The Price of Salt (original 1952; edition 2004)

by Patricia Highsmith, W. W. Norton

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Member:almigwin
Title:The Price of Salt
Authors:Patricia Highsmith
Other authors:W. W. Norton
Info:W.W. Norton & Co. (2004), Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:novel, lesbian fiction

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The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith (1952)

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‘Don’t you want to forget it, if it’s past?’
‘I don’t know. I don’t know just how you mean that.’
‘I mean, are you sorry?’
‘No. Would I do the same thing again? Yes.’
‘Do you mean with somebody else, or with her?’
‘With her,’ Therese said. The corner of her mouth went up in a smile.
‘But the end was a fiasco.’
‘Yes. I mean I’d go through the end, too.’
‘And you’re still going through it.’
Therese didn’t say anything.


Patricia Highsmith got the idea for Carol (or The Price of Salt as it was named originally) shortly after her first novel, Strangers on a Train was published. She lived in New York at the time, was depressed, and in need of money. She took a job as a sales assistant in a department store and, one day, met a lady customer in a mink coat. The stranger in the store made such a strong impression on her that it gave her an idea for a new book. An onset of fever (from chickenpox) shortly after the encounter helped with the writing.

I have no idea if the fever really had anything to do with the writing or whether this is just my impression but the story of Therese Belivet and Carol Aird had a feverish quality that had me hooked from the start and had me lose sleep because I had to know how the story would end. Yes, this was another one of those books where I had to stay up all night to finish it, even though the two protagonists were difficult to like at times.

Therese is in her early twenties (I think), stuck in a dead-end sales job, has aspirations of becoming a stage designer, and generally seems to lack empathy for any of the people around her. Carol, on the other hand, is a relatively well-off divorcee who gives off an air of detachment. It is only in the course of their story that we get to see behind the veneer that both characters put up for different reasons - one out of immaturity and one out of a need for self-defence.

However, likable characters is not what Highsmith's books are about. For me, Highsmith's books are primarily about one thing - intensity. This is the aspect that has appealed to me most in her novels. And although the plot and thematic focus of Carol depart from the thriller genre that her publishers wanted her to follow, there is certainly enough "suspense" writing to have kept me reading until the wee hours. In particular, there are two scenes, where I sat on the edge of my seat: one in the later part of the book where I found myself yelling at Therese because she was behaving so childish it drove me mad, and one that had me glued to page thinking that if it were a scene in a film, the theatre audience would collectively gasp and fall silent to see what happens next:

"‘Crawl in the back and get the gun,’ Carol said.
Therese did not move for a moment.
Carol glanced at her. ‘Will you?’
Therese did agilely in her slacks over the seat back, and dragged the navy blue suitcase on to the seat. She opened the clasps and got out the sweater with the gun. ‘Just hand it to me,’ Carol said calmly.
‘I want it in the side pocket.’
She reached her hand over her shoulder, and Therese put the white handle of the gun into it, and crawled back into the front seat. The detective was still following them, half a mile behind them, back of the horse and farm wagon that had turned into the highway from a dirt road.
Carol held Therese’s hand and drove with her left hand. Therese looked down at the faintly freckled fingers that dug their strong cool tips into her palm. ‘I’m going to talk to him again,’ Carol said, and pressed the gas pedal down steadily
."

This scene alone is one of the reasons I really want to see the film version and I am miffed that I didn't get a chance to see it at our local cinema.

I know that a few readers have found the book slow moving and boring, but I kinda liked the understated pace. It added to the feel of a 1950s road trip into the middle of nowhere, which, I thought, was also an appropriate metaphor for the relationship between Therese and Carol - a journey that lacked company, landmarks, or sign posts.

In the Afterword (written in 1989) of the edition I read, Highsmith wrote that she "like[s] to avoid labels. It is American publishers who love them."
As mentioned above, after the publication of her first novel, Strangers on a Train, Highsmith's publishers wanted to see her establish herself in the thriller genre. They rejected her manuscript of Carol and urged her to write another thriller. Defying her publisher's request, Highsmith offered to release the book under an alias and sought out another publisher who would to publish a lesbian romance novel that dared to criticise contemporary American society in 1952.

Considering that this could have been the end of a writing career that had not even started, yet, and considering that presumably there would also have been some backlash to her personal exposure, I truly admire Highsmith's insistence on getting the book published.

The publication itself is not the only break with commercial wisdom that happened with Carol. Highsmith also broke with the convention of how she described her characters as ordinary women, how she re-evaluated the importance of home life and family, and asked the specific question of what price people would pay to even attempt living a life of their own design. As such, I must admit that I actually preferred the book's original title: The Price of Salt.

"In the middle of the block, she opened the door of a coffee shop, but they were playing one of the songs she had heard with Carol everywhere, and she let the door close and walked on. The music lived, but the world was dead. And the song would die one day, she thought, but how would the world come back to life? How would its salt come back?"
( )
  BrokenTune | Aug 21, 2016 |
I was prompted to read this book because of the upcoming film, Carol, due to be released this fall. It stars 2 of my favorites, Cate Blanchett & Rooney Mara. I purchased the book without realizing what it was actually about. Never having read anything by Patricia Highsmith, I was not sure what to expect.
The first thing that struck me while reading, were her awkward sentences. This was surprising from a writter of Patricia Highsmith's caliber. I found that I had to re-read some passages in order to clarify clunky sections.
The story, in short, is a romance between two women and revolves around Therese, an aspiring set designer and her attraction to Carol, an attractive, wealthy, stay-at-home mother, going through a divorce and custody battle for her young daughter. They meet at the dept store where Therese is working during Christmas. Therese is immediately fascinated with Carol and not long after they meet, they plan a road trip out west, an escape from their current situations but problems with Carol's divorce and custody battle follow.
I found Therese to be a very dull & wishy-washy character. Her obsession with Carol & everything that had to do with Carol became grating, as was Therese's passivity. Carol's character was more interesting, but we do not learn a lot about her as the story is told from Therese's view point. Therese has this irritating habit of never questioning Carol about anything of importance.
Overall I thought the story dull and the ending unconvincing. I can see where The Price of Salt would be well suited to be adapted into a film as the story reads very much like a play. And it's easy to imagine Cate Blanchette in the role of Carol. But, I am not keen on watching a romance between two women unfold on the screen, so this is a film I will take a pass on. As for the book, it was just meh....... ( )
  Icewineanne | Aug 4, 2016 |
I have been looking forward to reading "Carol" for years and I was even quite excited by the style when I started but it was pretty slow going all the way through. I still don't really understand either Therese or Carol, except for in very particular moments (moments from which I cannot see how they get to their next thought/action most of the time). Insightful at times but for me, mostly too abstruse. ( )
  askajnaiman | Jun 14, 2016 |
Lonely shopgirl/aspiring set designer Therese's life is changed suddenly and definitively when she meets Carol, an older, sophisticated but equally lonely woman trapped in complicated divorce proceedings. The two women embark on a lesbian relationship (obliquely described by today's standards) and take a rather pointless road trip to the Western half of the United States. Under Carol's influence, Therese dumps her safe but prosaic boyfriend and comes of age as a more fully realized version of herself.

Other readers say that this story has a happy ending (because neither heroine ends up insane or dead), but I am not sure I see it. I find the ending ambiguous. I have the feeling that Therese will spend the rest of her life trying to recapture what she had with either Carol herself or with a Carol-substitute but will find it is not possible because she is not the same person as she was when she was with her first love. Carol herself is not a sympathetic character; she is selfish and toys with Therese's affections.

In my opinion, this novel is best read as a 1950s period piece about forbidden love, in which feelings are heightened or deadened by excessive drinking and smoking. ( )
  akblanchard | May 14, 2016 |
At the time, an unusual happy ending for a homosexual love between two woman ( )
  AnneliM | May 13, 2016 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
To Edna, Jordy and Jeff
First words
The lunch hour in the co-workers' cafeteria at Frankenberg's had reached its peak.
Quotations
Happiness was like a green vine spreading through her, stretching fine tendrils, bearing flowers through her flesh.
She had seen just now what she had only sensed before, that the whole world was ready to be their enemy, and suddenly what she and Carol had together seemed no longer love or anything happy but a monster between them, with each of them caught in a fist.
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Disambiguation notice
Carol was first published in the USA under the title The Price of Salt, 1952, and the author's pseudonym of Claire Morgan.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393325997, Paperback)

Now recognized as a masterwork, the scandalous novel that anticipated Nabokov's Lolita.

"I have long had a theory that Nabokov knew The Price of Salt and modeled the climactic cross-country car chase in Lolita on Therese and Carol's frenzied bid for freedom," writes Terry Castle in The New Republic about this novel, arguably Patricia Highsmith's finest, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Clare Morgan. Soon to be a new film, The Price of Salt tells the riveting story of Therese Belivet, a stage designer trapped in a department-store day job, whose salvation arrives one day in the form of Carol Aird, an alluring suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce. They fall in love and set out across the United States, pursued by a private investigator who eventually blackmails Carol into a choice between her daughter and her lover. With this reissue, The Price of Salt may finally be recognized as a major twentieth-century American novel.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:19 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

From the Publisher: "I have long had a theory that Nabokov knew The Price of Salt and modeled the climactic cross-country car chase in Lolita on Therese and Carol's frenzied bid for freedom," writes Terry Castle in The New Republic about this novel, arguably Patricia Highsmith's finest, first published in 1952 under the pseudonym Clare Morgan. Soon to be a new film, The Price of Salt tells the riveting story of Therese Belivet, a stage designer trapped in a department-store day job, whose salvation arrives one day in the form of Carol Aird, an alluring suburban housewife in the throes of a divorce. They fall in love and set out across the United States, pursued by a private investigator who eventually blackmails Carol into a choice between her daughter and her lover. With this reissue, The Price of Salt may finally be recognized as a major twentieth-century American novel.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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