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Legend by Marie Lu
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Legend (edition 2011)

by Marie Lu

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,7992163,891 (3.95)1 / 62
Member:Elizabeth324
Title:Legend
Authors:Marie Lu
Info:Putnam Juvenile (2011), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:YA, dystopian, government, murder, romance, Los Angeles

Work details

Legend by Marie Lu

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    Divergent by Veronica Roth (Aleana)
  2. 00
    The Bridge by Jane Higgins (wegc)
    wegc: Both books feature a divided society with one side having military-trained students and the other struggling for survival, and secret plots.
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English (218)  Swedish (1)  All languages (219)
Showing 1-5 of 218 (next | show all)
3.5
  aweinel | Jul 14, 2014 |
Another great read for the dystopic fantasy genre. This is a novel that would be great for 5th graders on up, the struggle that Day has within himself is enlightening, but Lu takes it one step further and compounds that with his relationship with June. Is it like Hunger Games? Yes, but it works. ( )
  beckylynn | Jul 13, 2014 |
This book made for great lightweight entertainment. Fifteen year-old Daniel "Day" Wing, who tells one half of the story, is an outcast and an outlaw in a future dystopian United States where the West has become a separate Republic at war with the rest of the nation. The other narrator is his nemesis, June Iparis, also 15 years old, a brilliant prodigy, and the youngest girl ever promoted to an important army rank following the murder of her older brother, who had been her sole caretaker since their parents died in an accident. June is informed her brother's murderer is Day, and she vows to track him down and take her revenge. The story was fairly predictable, within a genre that has been overdone, i.e. the YA dystopian novel, so that while the particulars were interesting enough, overall it felt like I'd been on a very similar path before. I should probably rate the book a little higher for sheer diversion value, but several details just didn't ring true to me and I felt I was being manipulated by a publisher who evidently wanted to hook in the reader to continue on yet another series. It was fun while it lasted, but this one while remain a one-book stand for me. ( )
  Smiler69 | Jul 4, 2014 |
A copy of a copy of a copy, now with more gimmicks.

Legend by Marie Lu

June Iparis wants to find the Republic's most-wanted criminal Day, even though no one knows what he looks like, and avenge her brother's death. Day wants to remain a vigilante while keeping his family fed and plague-free. Both youngsters are beautiful and exceptionally smart and athletic, so naturally they will develop The Hots to complicate their situation.

Reading this book was like hopping into a fully-loaded Lamborghini and being unable to get it started, listening to the engine whine as it tried to turn over instead of flipping into a full-throated roar, before it begins to disintegrate around you. First the I lost a mirror, then the muffler hit the pavement, then all four wheels went at once.

The beginning of the book was exciting and set up a morally complex, high-stakes plot with a lot of potential. June was an interesting character, Day was an interesting character. I believed in the exceptional nature of both, as a result of both genetics and hard work. They lived in a dystopia with a lot of dirt for digging into. They had many fully-formed relationships and attachments beyond the one that eventually formed between them. So why then, halfway through the book, did I find myself wondering why I didn't like it more? Why did I spend the next quarter mentally picking it apart instead of enjoying the story, before losing interest entirely and skimming the last quarter?

I'm going to go with a list:

Gimmicks. This book is loaded with visual gimmicks that became distraction while reading. Gold, sans-serif, space-age-inspired font for Day's sections. A more traditional font for June. Gigantic 24-point headers screaming JUNE or DAY to indicate shifts in point-of-view. The well-designed Republic emblem on the cover felt like it was mocking me for thinking the Republic in the book would be as thoroughly considered as its logo. The brushed-steel texture of the cover and chrome-finish gold of the flaps on the jacket. I understand why each of these aesthetic choices was made, however at some point someone should have realized it was too much and dialed it back. The overwrought design of the book as object wound up highlighting the under cooked story.
June and Day sounded like the same person. They thought the same, fought the same, and mostly talked the same with only superficial deviations. Perhaps this explains the headers and font disparity, but that is something that needed to be fixed at a writing level. Not a visual one.

Eureka moments. Several complex plot threads were unraveled by a character glancing at something and suddenly understanding everything behind it. Enormous logical leaps were taken, but the reader was not along for the ride. Saying "oh they just knew because they were super smart" is lazy writing. It's a cheat. There are many possible explanations and these developments were not well-supported.

The lady doth protest too much: I liked June as a character at first. She was tough, ambitious, focused, smart, and rebellious in an oddly patriotic way. There was a lot of potential there. As the book wore on she kept having to go to these formal events, and described her dresses in lavish technical detail even as she complained of being forced into them. That doesn't wash. It irked me that as an acknowledged military prodigy she would not wear her uniform to state occasions as all the men and higher-ranking women did. She started the novel with a rebellious, "I know best" spark that quickly fizzled.

The Republic is a military state, but they let a fifteen-year-old girl stroll about as she pleases sending guards away and meeting with prisoners alone.

The scenes on the street were strongest, but they were weakened by the lack of detail in the Republic. A civil war was hinted at and other factions mentioned, but never explained. The dirtiness of the streets was not contrasted with cleanliness or opulence in June's world at military school. The ball was dropped. I can only assume that Lu expected to have a trilogy to flesh things out. ( )
  ArmchairAuthor | Jul 3, 2014 |
A copy of a copy of a copy, now with more gimmicks.

June Iparis wants to find the Republic’s most-wanted criminal Day, even though no one knows what he looks like, and avenge her brother’s death. Day wants to remain a vigilante while keeping his family fed and plague-free. Both youngsters are beautiful and exceptionally smart and athletic, so naturally they will develop The Hots to complicate their situation.

Reading this book was like hopping into a fully-loaded Lamborghini and being unable to get it started, listening to the engine whine as it tried to turn over instead of flipping into a full-throated roar, until it begins to disintegrate around you. First I lost a mirror, then the muffler hit the pavement, then all four wheels went at once.

The beginning of the book was exciting and set up a morally complex, high-stakes plot with a lot of potential. June was an interesting character, Day was an interesting character. I believed in the exceptional nature of both, as a result of both genetics and hard work. They lived in a dystopia with a lot of dirt for digging into. They had many fully-formed relationships and attachments beyond the one that eventually formed between them. So why then, halfway through the book, did I find myself wondering why I didn’t like it more? Why did I spend the next quarter mentally picking it apart instead of enjoying the story, before losing interest entirely and skimming the last quarter?

I’m going to go with a list:

Gimmicks. This book is loaded with visual gimmicks that became distraction while reading. Gold, sans-serif, space-age-inspired font for Day’s sections. A more traditional font for June. Gigantic 24-point headers screaming JUNE or DAY to indicate shifts in point-of-view. The well-designed Republic emblem on the cover felt like it was mocking me for thinking the Republic in the book would be as thoroughly considered as its logo. The brushed-steel texture of the cover and chrome-finish gold of the flaps on the jacket. I understand why each of these aesthetic choices was made, however at some point someone should have realized it was too much and dialed it back. The overwrought design of the book as object wound up highlighting the under cooked story.
June and Day sounded like the same person. They thought the same, fought the same, and mostly talked the same with only superficial deviations. Perhaps this explains the headers and font disparity, but that is something that needed to be fixed at a writing level. Not a visual one.
Eureka moments. Several complex plot threads were unraveled by a character glancing at something and suddenly understanding everything behind it. Enormous logical leaps were taken, but the reader was not along for the ride. Saying “oh they just knew because they were super smart” is lazy writing. It’s a cheat. There are many possible explanations and these developments were not well-supported.
The lady doth protest too much: I liked June as a character at first. She was tough, ambitious, focused, smart, and rebellious in an oddly patriotic way. There was a lot of potential there. As the book wore on she kept having to go to these formal events, and described her dresses in lavish technical detail even as she complained of being forced into them. That doesn’t wash. It irked me that as an acknowledged military prodigy she would not wear her uniform to state occasions as all the men and higher-ranking women did. She started the novel with a rebellious, “I know best” spark that quickly fizzled.
The Republic is a military state, but they let a fifteen-year-old girl stroll about as she pleases sending guards away and meeting with prisoners alone.
The scenes on the street were strongest, but they were weakened by the lack of detail in the Republic. A civil war was hinted at and other factions mentioned, but never explained. The dirtiness of the streets was not contrasted with cleanliness or opulence in June’s world at military school. The ball was dropped. I can only assume that Lu expected to have a trilogy to flesh things out. ( )
  ArmchairAuthor | Jul 3, 2014 |
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"For My Mother"
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My mother thinks I'm dead.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 039925675X, Hardcover)

Unabridged, 7 CDs, 9 hours

Read by Steven Kaplan & Mariel Stern

What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic's wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic's highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country's most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths--until the day June's brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family's survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias's death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

Full of nonstop action, suspense, and romance, this novel is sure to move readers as much as it thrills.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:36:25 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

In a dark future, when North America has split into two warring nations, fifteen-year-olds Day, a famous criminal, and prodigy June, the brilliant soldier hired to capture him, discover that they have a common enemy.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

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