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There Are Things I Want You to Know about…
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"There Are Things I Want You to Know" about Stieg Larsson and Me (2011)

by Eva Gabrielsson (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 5 of 5
I really enjoyed spending time with Eva and felt her pain as she told her story. She's a great lady who deserved much better than she got after her husband died. Their love and the life they shared makes for a great love story. ( )
  ToniApicelli | Jan 13, 2012 |
This book is short, but it's quality over quantity. It's written as if you're sitting in a cafe drinking coffee (COFFEE!) with Eva and spending a long afternoon chatting about her love. If you have read any of the Millennium Trilogy, this is worth reading as you will gain greater insight and appreciation into those three books. The only shortcoming is - this book was too short! I was left wanting more! ( )
  librariankate7578 | Jan 5, 2012 |
Interesting information about their relationship and the family dynamics. The family rejected her and will not accept her or give her any money or property. ( )
  lmonch | Oct 22, 2011 |
How does one write a book to tell millions of fans what a man was really like when so much has been written about him?

Eva Gabrielsson and Stieg Larsson lived together over 30 years. Larsson unexpectantly died just before his first three novels were published and went on to receive meteoric and international acclaim. Afterwards there was so many truths, half-truths, myths, and lies published about Larsson and the couple that it has often be difficult to hear anything through the noise. After facing the horrible shock and tremendous grief of the death of her soul-mate, Gabrielsson attempts to introduce strangers to the man she knew.

Many elements have been been printed before in news stories but she does describe his early life and uses it to help illustrate Larsson's character. For readers who have not read Larsson's articles about political extremists -- which is the case for many who live outside Sweden -- there are only hints of his journalistic efforts. This hinders the readers' ability to truly grasp the depth of the Larsson (and Gabrielsson's) commitment to sharing observations of the very real dangers in the political and social landscape.

For me -- as an American -- I was drawn in to the Millennium trilogy in part because of the peeling back to reveal the social injustice that occurs often hidden around us each day. The surprise was the amount of common ground between the Sweden described in the novels and the USA: the growth of extreme conservative right-wing; increase in hate speech; erosion of journalistic ethics and standards; monetary greed from business and political corruption, etc.

So while we don't really get to know Larsson the man, we are introduced to his partner Gabrielsson. While her emotions are reserved, it is evident that her loss has affected her profoundly. A loss compounded by a legal injustice -- Sweden does not recognize the rights of cohabitating partners -- and a loss of access to the control of his works. These injustices are keen and sharp. The end of the book it is about recovery. The slow climb back from the nadir experienced after Larsson's death, the fame, and the betrayals. Not every fight will be won but she is facing each one. ( )
  esm07 | Aug 27, 2011 |
I liked this book more than I thought I would. It's a quick read, and presents a moving portrait of a woman in mourning.

I'm not a big fan of Stieg Larsson or the Milennium trilogy (I've read only The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and don't have much interest in reading the other two). I was interested in this book because of the controversy regarding Larsson's estate. The author died suddenly, without a will, and without ever marrying his live-in companion of over thirty years, Eva Gabrielsson. Therefore, the millions Larsson has earned posthumously due to the success of his crime novels have gone to his father and brother, not to his companion.

Gabrielsson's understandably bitter, She blames mysterious enemies ("they") who overworked her late lover to the point of early death. She even performs an ancient Norse ritual to inflict curses on these people, whoever they are (but, as she admits, Larsson did not take good care of himself and that his mother and grandfather both died young, from heart problems, just like Larsson did. His heart attack at the age of fifty is much more likely to be the natural result of these factors than the machinations of mysterious enemies).

She gives a number of excuses why they never found an opportunity in 30 years to get married. Although she never says this, I suspect that the main reason is that as former Trotskyites, they thought marriage was just too bourgeois for them), Predictably, she claims there was a will that left everything to her, but it was regrettably unwitnessed and therefore not valid.

I don't know anything about Swedish law, but it seems to me that if you aren't married, you can't expect the benefits of marriage. If you don't have a properly-prepared will, you can't expect the benefits of having a properly-prepared will. It's too bad, but that's the way the law works.

The one thing she still has is his laptop, which she says contains an incomplete draft of a fourth Millennium novel. She says that she is capable of finishing the book herself, and hints that she was involved in the writing of Larsen's published books ("We often wrote together," she writes ambiguously).

I do sympathize with Eva Gabrielsson. She's lost the love of her life, his money and control of his literary legacy. It's clear her impulse is to blame everyone else (the father, the brother, the enemies) for the situation, rather than the man she loved, who, in my opinion, bears some of the responsibility as well.. ( )
  akblanchard | Jul 12, 2011 |
Showing 5 of 5
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gabrielsson, EvaAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Colombani, Marie-FrancoiseAuthormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coverdale, LindaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jensen, Kjell OlafTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Llopis, MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
To all of those who supported me when I faltered. And to those who are standing by me still. - EG
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People often ask me if the Swedish drink as much coffee as do the characters in The Millennium Trilogy.
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Book description
There is only one person who can tell the real Stieg Larsson story, and that is his lifelong companion Eva Gabrielsson. This is her book.
The keys to the 'Stieg Larsson phenomenon' all lie with Stieg Larsson, the man, and no one knew him like Eva. Here she tells the story of their 30-year romance, of Stieg's life-long struggle to expose Sweden's Neo-Nazis, of his fight to keep the magazine he founded, Expo, alive and his difficult relationships with his immediate family. She talks of the genesis of the Millennium trilogy, the sources for characters and places in each book, the mystery of the fourth volume and the saga of Larsson's death and his legacy.
Poignant in its account of two soulmates and the life they shared, this is a story told with candour and dignity. It reflects a deep insight into a man everyone wants to know better, about whom so little is known.
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Here is the real inside story--not the one about the Stieg Larsson phenomenon, but rather the love story of a man and a woman whose lives came to be guided by politics and love, coffee and activism, writing and friendship. Only one person knows that story well enough to tell it with authority. Eva and Stieg shared everything, starting when they were both eighteen until his untimely death 32 years later. Here, Eva accepts the daunting challenge of telling the story of their shared life, steeped in love and sharpened in the struggle for justice and human rights. She chooses to tell it in short, spare, lyrical chapters, like snapshots, the inside account of how he wrote, why he wrote, who the sources were for Lisbeth and his other characters--graciously answering Stieg's readers' most pressing questions--and at the same time telling us about love and loss, death, betrayal, and the mistreatment of women.--From publisher description.… (more)

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Seven Stories Press

Three editions of this book were published by Seven Stories Press.

Editions: 1609803639, 1609804104, 1609803647

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