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Cold Days: A Novel of the Dresden Files by…
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Cold Days: A Novel of the Dresden Files (edition 2012)

by Jim Butcher

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1,329885,845 (4.33)82
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Title:Cold Days: A Novel of the Dresden Files
Authors:Jim Butcher
Info:Roc (2012), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 528 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Cold Days by Jim Butcher

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Showing 1-5 of 87 (next | show all)
Always fun! I highly recommend all of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files. ( )
  cpq | Sep 30, 2014 |
I a big fan of the Dresden Files. I read a bunch of pulp series, but there is something that sets Butcher and his stories apart from and above other writers in the pulp genre. I'm not sure I can articulate it well, but here goes.

Above and beyond everything else he does, Butcher has rock-solid fundamentals. He plots his novels well. He's disciplined, so there aren't continuity errors or imbalances in the story. There is something very workmanlike (or a non-gendered synonym I can't think of) about Butcher's work, and I say this not to point out a lack of deeper work, but as a compliment. Butcher takes care of business on a fundamental level. He's not just making stuff up as he goes along, but his stories are laid down on top of well-thought out foundations.

Beyond that, he writes good characters that change from book to book. He makes a bunch of pop culture references that don't annoy me. He also has a way of building up to climax events that makes what is going on seem reasonable, when taken out of the context of his structure, would just seem over-the-top.

I guess that is as good a way of summing up Butcher and the Dresden Files as any: he does the background work to make ridiculous seeming plot resolutions appear reasonable and natural. There's a LOT of bad fiction out there that has similar elements. It's not rare to have an Urban Fantasy wizard who blows stuff up and has a temper, but really a softy on the inside. It is rare to read someone in the genre with enough restraint to put these elements into a disciplined order.

So, yeah. Jim Butcher, master craftsperson. He knows how to construct a novel very well. So well, it is hard to tell if there is a deeper art to his work. I don't (DON'T) want to make a ham-fisted artisan-artist distinction. I just want to say that Jim Butcher does what he does really, really well. ( )
  nnschiller | Sep 18, 2014 |
I a big fan of the Dresden Files. I read a bunch of pulp series, but there is something that sets Butcher and his stories apart from and above other writers in the pulp genre. I'm not sure I can articulate it well, but here goes.

Above and beyond everything else he does, Butcher has rock-solid fundamentals. He plots his novels well. He's disciplined, so there aren't continuity errors or imbalances in the story. There is something very workmanlike (or a non-gendered synonym I can't think of) about Butcher's work, and I say this not to point out a lack of deeper work, but as a compliment. Butcher takes care of business on a fundamental level. He's not just making stuff up as he goes along, but his stories are laid down on top of well-thought out foundations.

Beyond that, he writes good characters that change from book to book. He makes a bunch of pop culture references that don't annoy me. He also has a way of building up to climax events that makes what is going on seem reasonable, when taken out of the context of his structure, would just seem over-the-top.

I guess that is as good a way of summing up Butcher and the Dresden Files as any: he does the background work to make ridiculous seeming plot resolutions appear reasonable and natural. There's a LOT of bad fiction out there that has similar elements. It's not rare to have an Urban Fantasy wizard who blows stuff up and has a temper, but really a softy on the inside. It is rare to read someone in the genre with enough restraint to put these elements into a disciplined order.

So, yeah. Jim Butcher, master craftsperson. He knows how to construct a novel very well. So well, it is hard to tell if there is a deeper art to his work. I don't (DON'T) want to make a ham-fisted artisan-artist distinction. I just want to say that Jim Butcher does what he does really, really well. ( )
  nnschiller | Sep 18, 2014 |
Definitely, definitely worth the wait.

Harry Dresden is back, alive and snark included. From the last book, we already know that he's got the mantle of the Winter Knight weighing down his shoulders. But here, Mab has given him a nigh impossible task - but along the way he has to prevent the destruction of the world as well. As always, right?

There are only two small annoyances I have with this book that I completely understand and probably wouldn't change anyway. The first is a small nitpicky annoyance where it seems like Butcher is trying to forcibly insert philosophy and politics into the story (i.e. gay rights). There's nothing wrong with this since all authors do it; however, the way it was done here seemed completely out of the blue and unnatural to the story. The second is just that I cannot believe that Harry could have so many one-on-one interactions with people. Such a tactic is clever since it gives us time to reestablish how characters interact and how their relationship has grown or changed. But ugh, sometimes I read the scenes and think that it's somewhat not realistic (scenes with Thomas or Karrin). Really, the bro-love went a touch too far with the continued banter every scene they were in together. ...just a touch though. It was pretty much spot on. Everything was pretty much spot on.

Dresden and romance... it was handled exceedingly well. I always get a little wary of romance in action-packed novels, but it was handled tastefully. Unfortunately, romance always means that many pages will be devoted to their interactions and their developing understanding of one another - which takes away time from other interesting characters and fascinating plot lines, but sigh I understand, I do.

Three and a half stars because I liked it a lot - rounded down for now, but if I reread it, it will be promoted to four stars. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Definitely, definitely worth the wait.

Harry Dresden is back, alive and snark included. From the last book, we already know that he's got the mantle of the Winter Knight weighing down his shoulders. But here, Mab has given him a nigh impossible task - but along the way he has to prevent the destruction of the world as well. As always, right?

There are only two small annoyances I have with this book that I completely understand and probably wouldn't change anyway. The first is a small nitpicky annoyance where it seems like Butcher is trying to forcibly insert philosophy and politics into the story (i.e. gay rights). There's nothing wrong with this since all authors do it; however, the way it was done here seemed completely out of the blue and unnatural to the story. The second is just that I cannot believe that Harry could have so many one-on-one interactions with people. Such a tactic is clever since it gives us time to reestablish how characters interact and how their relationship has grown or changed. But ugh, sometimes I read the scenes and think that it's somewhat not realistic (scenes with Thomas or Karrin). Really, the bro-love went a touch too far with the continued banter every scene they were in together. ...just a touch though. It was pretty much spot on. Everything was pretty much spot on.

Dresden and romance... it was handled exceedingly well. I always get a little wary of romance in action-packed novels, but it was handled tastefully. Unfortunately, romance always means that many pages will be devoted to their interactions and their developing understanding of one another - which takes away time from other interesting characters and fascinating plot lines, but sigh I understand, I do.

Three and a half stars because I liked it a lot - rounded down for now, but if I reread it, it will be promoted to four stars. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Butcher, Jimprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Marsters, JamesNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McGrath, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shutterstock.comCover imagessecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simmons, JoieCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For
Chris Achterhof,
writer of ''Greed" (he'll know why after reading this),
and all my old gaming buddies in the International Fantasy Gaming Society. 

You people are all silly, and you made the nineties a much brighter place.
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Mab, the Queen of Air and Darkness, monarch of the Winter Court of the Sidhe, has unique ideas regarding physical therapy.
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Book description
After being murdered by a mystery assailant, navigating his way through the realm between life and death, and being brought back to the mortal world, Harry realizes that maybe death wasn't all that bad. Because he is no longer Harry Dresden, Chicago's only professional wizard.

He is now Harry Dresden, Winter Knight to Mab, The Queen of Air and Darkness. after Harry had no choice but to swear his fealty, Mab wasn't ab out to let something as petty as death steal away the prize she had sought for so long. And now her word is his command, no matter what she wants him to do, no matter where she wants him to go, no matter who she wants him to kill.

Guess which Mab wants first.

Of course, it won't be an ordinary, everyday assassination. Mab wants her newest minion to pull off the impossible: kill an immortal. No problem there, right? And to make matters worse, there exists a growing threat to an unfathomable source of magic that could take out the entire midwest if not stopped.

Beset by enemies new and old, Harry must gather his friends and allies, dodge the Great Hunt, prevent the annihilation of countless innocents, kill an immortal or 20, and find a way out of his eternal subservience before his newfound powers claim the only thing he has left to call his own - 
his soul.
Haiku summary
Hottie wizard dies,
Comes back stronger than before;
Saves the world again.

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Following his death by a mystery assailant, Harry Dresden, Winter Knight to Mab, the Queen of Air and Darkness, must gather his friends and allies, prevent the annihilation of countless innocents, and find a way out of his eternal subservience before his newfound powers claim the only thing he has left to call his own ... his soul.… (more)

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