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Fast Boat to China: Corporate Flight and the…
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Fast Boat to China: Corporate Flight and the Consequences of Free Trade;…

by Andrew Ross

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Fast Boat to China investigates the offshore impact of white collar, high-tech job outsourcing to China. He attempts to dispel myths about Chinese employees propagated by expatriate managers in China who recruit locals to fill these positions. He draws from his interviews of employees in this transitional economy - engineers, professionals, and liberated Shanghainese women, or "xiaojie."

The book speculates on the implications of outsourcing jobs to Shanghai, and further west to Suzhou and Chongqing, not only to the Chinese themselves, but also for Indians and Taiwanese. While Ross does not dispute that outsourcing may help line the pockets for expatriate managers and CEO's of multinational companies, he scrutinizes the job insecurity and identity crises that outsourcing seems to bring to workers in a globalizing China. ( )
  jump4sushi | Feb 20, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 037542363X, Hardcover)

Corporate outsourcing has bitterly divided advocates and critics of free trade; the transfer of jobs overseas to cheaper locations has had a profound effect on dislocated employees and their communities, and, increasingly, it is the high–skill, white–collar positions that are feeling the impact.

In Fast Boat to China, Andrew Ross looks at the controversial issue of offshore outsourcing to China—specifically that of white-collar jobs at U.S. global manufacturing and high-tech companies.

Having spent a year talking with skilled local employees and their foreign managers in Taiwan, in Shanghai, and in the far west of China, Ross reports on China’s workforce, where employees, for the first time, are emulating a corporate mentality of job–hopping as a way of life. Ross looks as well at the effects of foreign investment on China’s (newly capitalist) economy and at how multinational companies such as GM, GE, Philips, Lucent, IBM, and Motorola are taking advantage of Chinese nationalism in planning for their future growth there.

The author makes clear the impact of globalization on Chinese workers, who, he discovered, have become as insecure as their Western counterparts. He reports on the daily reality of corporate free trade and how it doesn’t at all correspond to its classical definition . . . how India and China, the world’s two most populous countries, are competing for low–paying jobs and affecting the growth of white–collar jobs in Asia . . . and, finally, how China’s huge gains in technology will soon allow it to compete for top–level jobs at the same time that it absorbs lower-end jobs, and how this will affect workers and economies in East Asia and the West.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:01:29 -0400)

Labor scholar Ross looks at offshore outsourcing to China, specifically of white-collar jobs. He reports on a workforce where employees, for the first time, are emulating a corporate mentality of job-hopping as a way of life. Ross looks as well at the effects of foreign investment on China's (newly capitalist) economy and at how multinational companies are taking advantage of Chinese nationalism in planning for their future growth there. Chinese workers, he discovered, have become as insecure as their Western counterparts. The daily reality of corporate free trade doesn't correspond to its classical definition--India and China, the world's two most populous countries, are competing for low-paying jobs and affecting the growth of white-collar jobs in Asia. Finally, China's huge gains in technology will soon allow it to compete for top-level jobs at the same time that it absorbs lower-end jobs, affecting workers and economies east and west.--From publisher description.… (more)

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