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The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey
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The Snow Child (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Eowyn Ivey

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1,8581743,721 (3.98)232
Member:izzybee
Title:The Snow Child
Authors:Eowyn Ivey
Info:Headline Review (2012), Hardcover, 432 pages
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Work details

The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey (Author) (2012)

  1. 40
    The Girl with Glass Feet by Ali Shaw (Becchanalia)
    Becchanalia: Same delicate language and imagery, a similar sense of wistful beauty and elements of magical realism.
  2. 00
    The Gracekeepers by Kirsty Logan (vwinsloe)
    vwinsloe: A folk tale brought to life.
  3. 11
    The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker (Iudita)
  4. 01
    Silas Marner by George Eliot (suniru)
    suniru: Both books center upon orphans and both have fairy tale roots.
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» See also 232 mentions

English (170)  Norwegian (1)  Danish (1)  Chinese, traditional (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (174)
Showing 1-5 of 170 (next | show all)
Lovely, magical. Slow start but after 40 or 50 pages I was hooked. ( )
  susanbooks | Jul 20, 2015 |
Oh this book is simply beautiful! I have no proper words to describe it except enchanting and lyrical, you'd simply get lost in the words while reading.

I won't spoil the story(ok maybe a little) but I will comment on how I feel about them! For the first two parts, the story was going rather smoothly and getting more and more exciting. But for the third part, I think the story kind of.. strayed. I say "stray" not because it went off topic but because it was totally unexpected. Yes yes yes I know stories shouldn't be predictable. It's just that I don't think it went well with the story line so far. Putting the girl in a romantic relationship was cute, really, but marriage was a step too far. Also, I think the ending would have been more sentimental and thought-provoking without the epilogue. Maybe that's just me...

Overall, the book is brilliant. I love love love the characters, the setting(the descriptions are so finely written it felt almost real) and most of all, the author's magically woven words. I absolutely devoured this book and I look forward to doing it again with her next book :) ( )
  novewong | Jul 8, 2015 |
Nice first effort by this writer; however, this book is deeply flawed. I managed to finish it, but I was dissapointed by the writer's inability to take any chances. At no point does the novel explore anything deeper than surface level emotions or ideas. Essentially, the novel follows a cast of innocent, but unrealistic Alaskan personalities to stretch a rather thin fairytale into a full-lenght novel. Having lived in Alaska, I found some of the description of winter and nature interesting. I think this writer has potential, but I wouldn't recommend The Snow Child to anyone. ( )
  ProfH | May 13, 2015 |
I first heard about this book from blogger, Cindy at “Utah’s Mom’s Life“. I had the book on my reader for some time and was waiting for the perfect time to read this little gem. I have been in a reading funk lately, so I wanted a book that was fantasy in some ways, a book that would take me away from the serious books I had read lately.

While this book is not a “light” read, it is definitely one that is magical, deals with heartache, family, and realizing that dreams do come true…even if they aren’t wrapped up in a way that one perceives.

I loved the rugged and rural setting of the book. Set in the 1920’s, Jack and Mabel decide to venture to a new land: Alaska. There, they decide to make their home, away from the daily reminders of the loss of their child and family/friends to remind them of those painful memories. However, as life always shows, no one can run from their past memories. Mabel is quite stoic and has an inner strength that helps carry her and Jack through the cold winters and harsh reminders of their aloneness. However, they soon find they aren’t alone and develop friendships with George and Esther, and become parents to Faina, their snow child.

I love the relationship between Esther and Mabel, how Esther’s resilience and strength helps Mabel and Jack, how George and Esther take care of them and teach them, and the way they all become friends, then family. The details of their Alaska homesteads were quite descriptive, that it was quite easy to see it in my mind.

There were many times I didn’t know where the story would go or how it would end, and that was okay. I liked not knowing where the author would take her readers. However, there were many times towards the end of the book that I would think: “awww…that’s a beautiful ending”. Then, I would turn the page, only to find another chapter. After awhile, I was ready for it to end. I felt like one of the animals ensnared in a trap…quick to grab you and slow to let go. However, that was just the last few chapters. The first 30 something chapters actually move quite nicely and the characters are all connected in some way.

The ending, or multiple endings (in my opinion) are hard, sad, intense, which is reminder of the harsh times during that era. Just like the snow is surely guaranteed to appear each year (and with it bring hope), this story also brings hope and shows how you can either stay stuck in your own tragedy or see each new possibility as an opportunity to bring joy. Overall, a great book! ( )
  booksintheburbs | Apr 27, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 170 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ivey, EowynAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arlinghaus, ClaudiaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Biekmann, LidwienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chapman, IsabelleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grinde, HeidiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hansen, Marielle NielsenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, ToniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pareschi, MonicaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ransome, ArthurContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
'Wife, let us go into the yard behind and make a little snow girl; and perhaps she will come alive, and be a little daughter to us.'
'Husband' says the old woman, 'there's no knowing what may be. Let us go into the yard and make a little snow girl.'

The Little Daughter of the Snow' by Arthur Ransome
Dedication
For my daughters, Grace and Aurora
First words
Mabel had known there would be silence.
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Last words
Disambiguation notice
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Book description
A bewitching tale of heartbreak and hope set in 1920s Alaska.

Jack and Mabel have staked everything on making a fresh start for themselves in a homestead 'at the world's edge' in the raw Alaskan wilderness. But as the days grow shorter, Jack is losing his battle to clear the land, and Mabel can no longer contain her grief for the baby she lost many years before.

The evening the first snow falls, their mood unaccountably changes. In a moment of tenderness, the pair are surprised to find themselves building a snowman - or rather a snow girl - together. The next morning, all trace of her has disappeared, and Jack can't quite shake the notion that he glimpsed a small figure - a child? - running through the spruce trees in the dawn light. And how to explain the little but very human tracks Mabel finds at the edge of their property?

Written with the clarity and vividness of the Russian fairytale from which it takes its inspiration, The Snow Child is an instant classic - the story of a couple who take a child into their hearts, all the while knowing they can never truly call her their own.
L'Alaska , es forêts impénétarables , ses étendues enneigées . Son silence . Sa solitude. Depuis la mort de leur bébé , le marriage de Mabel et Jack n'a plus jamais été le même . Partir vivre sur ces terres inhospitalières paraissait alors une bonne idée . Peu de temps après , une petite fille apparaît près de leur cabane , parfois suivie d'un renard roux tout aussi farouche qu'elle . Qui est elle ? D'où vient elle ? Et si cette petite fille etait la clé de ce Bonheur qu'ils n'attendaient plus ? Inspiré d'un conte traditionnel ruse , la fille de l'hiver est à la fois un roman moderne et intemporel où le réalisme des descriptions n'enlève rien à la poésie d'une histoire merveilleuse ... dans tous les sens du terme.
Haiku summary
Set in Alaska,
A gentle tale about a
Snow child. Or is she?
(passion4reading)

No descriptions found.

(see all 3 descriptions)

Alaska in the 1920s is a difficult place for Jack and Mabel. Drifting apart, the childless couple discover Faina, a young girl living alone in the wilderness. Soon, Jack and Mabel come to love Faina as their own. But when they learn a surprising truth about the girl, their lives change in profound ways.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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