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The Chairs Are Where the People Go: How to…
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The Chairs Are Where the People Go: How to Live, Work, and Play in the…

by Misha Glouberman

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Don't pretend there is no Leader, essay # 6, is an excellent illumination of this common problem in many groups. ( )
  Janientrelac | Dec 7, 2014 |
The Chairs Are Where the People Go by Misha Glouberman is a collection of performance art ramblings as transcribed by Sheila Heti.

This is one of those books that I read completely out of context. I chose it because I liked (and still do) the title and the cover art. The problem I had was in not knowing how to approach these short essays.

Some of the essays seemed to be rather scholarly looks at different aspects of culture and psychology with a semiotics bent. Others though came off as self absorbed ramblings.

In the end I decided to move onto other books in my to be read pile. While there were certainly essays I enjoyed (the titular one, the on on bar fights, and the one on how to stop smoking), there wasn't enough to keep me reading. ( )
  pussreboots | Mar 12, 2014 |
like a blog as other reviewers suggested. not really very interesting. why did i finish it??? how did it get published????? ( )
  mahallett | Dec 27, 2012 |
An endearingly unassuming collection of short essays from a smart and sensible mind. ( )
  jorgearanda | Feb 23, 2012 |
Wasn't a big fan of the book. It's kind of like reading someone's blog - in fact, it would have been better as a blog. Some brief flashes of insight (organizing an un-conference was useful), but mostly it's boring. I was disappointed that there wasn't more explanation of who Misha actually is (and what qualifies him to write a book as opposed to any number of other Canadians). Reads like a self-published ebook or blog. ( )
  kjreed | Jan 1, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0865479453, Paperback)

Should neighborhoods change? Is wearing a suit a good way to quit smoking? Why do people think that if you do one thing, you’re against something else? Is monogamy a trick? Why isn’t making the city more fun for you and your friends a super-noble political goal? Why does a computer last only three years? How often should you see your parents? How should we behave at parties? Is marriage getting easier? What can spam tell us about the world?

Misha Glouberman’s friend and collaborator, Sheila Heti, wanted her next book to be a compilation of everything Misha knew. Together, they made a list of subjects. As Misha talked, Sheila typed. He talked about games, relationships, cities, negotiation, improvisation, Casablanca, conferences, and making friends. His subjects ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous. But sometimes what had seemed trivial began to seem important—and what had seemed important began to seem less so.

The Chairs Are Where the People Go is refreshing, appealing, and kind of profound. It’s a self-help book for people who don’t feel they need help, and a how-to book that urges you to do things you don’t really need to do.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:23 -0400)

"How should neighborhoods change? Is wearing a suit a good way to quit smoking? Why do people think that if you do one thing, you're against something else? Is monogamy a trick? Why isn't making the city more fun for you and your friends a super-noble political goal? Why does a computer last only three years? How often should you see your parents? How should we behave at parties? Is marriage getting easier? What can spam tell us about the world? Misha Glouberman's friend and collaborator, Sheila Heti, wanted her next book to be a compilation of everything Misha knew. Together, they made a list of subjects. As Misha talked, Sheila typed.... The Chairs are Where the People Go is refreshing, appealing, and kind of profound. It's a self-help book for people who don't feel they need help, and a how-to book that urges you to do things you don't really need to do."--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

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