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Beekeeping for Beginners [short story] by…
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Beekeeping for Beginners [short story] (2011)

by Laurie R. King

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1832264,645 (3.87)27

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Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
I thoroughly enjoyed my introduction to Laurie R. King's series featuring the aging Holmes and his young apprentice. This short story worked perfectly to showcase the author's writing, especially her excellence in capturing the 'voice' of Holmes. I thought this was a fast paced story that was also charming and bittersweet. It's really whet my appetite for more. Well done! ( )
  Zumbanista | Feb 23, 2016 |
I like Laurie King's work in general and love her take on Sherlock Holmes through the character of Mary Russell. I was not so taken with this story and I realized that part of the problem for me is the point of view. Holmes is a fascinating character to describe from the outside, but is very difficult to make believable from the inside. I was not fully convinced by the first-person Holmes here. That said, I'll continue to read books in the Russell series and I'm looking forward to her forthcoming historical mystery: The Bones of Paris. I appreciate the way she weaves her theological studies into the fiction. ( )
  bibleblaster | Jan 23, 2016 |
Summary:
New York Times bestselling author Laurie R. King reveals here an unforgettable new twist in the crackling adventure of how supersleuth Sherlock Holmes discovered his first (and finest) apprentice, Mary Russell.

Sherlock Holmes is fending off a particularly dark mood as he roams the Sussex Downs, in search of wild bees. The Great War may be raging across the Channel, but on the Downs, the great detective nears terminal melancholia—only to be saved by an encounter with headstrong, yellow-haired young Mary Russell, who soon becomes the Master’s apprentice not only in beekeeping but in detection.

Holmes instantly spots her remarkable ability, but his sharp eyes also see troubling problems. Why is this wealthy orphan who lives with her aunt so shabbily dressed? Why is she so prone to illness and accident? Is she herself the center of a mystery?

These are questions that the great detective must answer quickly lest his protégée, and his own new lease on life, meet a sudden, tragic end. The tale of their meeting has been told from Russell’s point of view, but even those who have never met the famed Russell-Holmes pair will read this tale with delight—and, as its climax builds, with breathless excitement.

My take: 4 look
A friend of mine has read several of the Mary Russell series, and piqued my interest in them. When I discovered this prequel, I was ready to begin. What a fantastic novella to introduce me to the characters and their quirks, and lay the foundation of the relationship between Sherlock Holmes and Mary Russell.

Mary Russell is quick, smart and the perfect apprentice for Sherlock Holmes. I can see trouble brewing between Mary and Dr. Watson, even through they have not yet met formally. The groundwork is there for a formidable relationship.

In this novella, Holmes feels a protectiveness of Mary Russell almost immediately, and when she starts showing up with unexplained maladies and bruising, he feels compelled to get to the bottom of it.

This was written very smartly and whetted my reading appetite for more in this series. ( )
  CarmenMilligan | Jan 18, 2016 |
"Never, ever, cease to feel wonder." ( )
  Jackie_Sassa | Nov 20, 2015 |
This is #10.5 in the series of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, but it serves as sort of a prequel to the entire series. It tells of the initial meeting of the two, told from the point of view of Holmes. Short and interesting! ( )
  TheresaCIncinnati | Aug 17, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
To the new bee
First words
Any reasonable man may reach a point in his life where self-destruction becomes a door worthy of consideration. A point at which it seems that the least a walking anachronism can do for the world is to remove himself from cluttering the landscape.
Quotations
There's nothing quite so handy as a nice controlled explosive device.
Rule One of surveillance is the same as that for beekeeping: Remain calm. Attitude is all, when it comes to disguise. If one does not emanate tension - rather, if one only emanates the diffuse tension of any ordinary city-dweller - even a suspicious eye will not snag upon one's figure.
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Sherlock Holmes is fending off a particularly dark mood as he roams the Sussex Downs, in search of wild bees. The Great War may be raging across the Channel, but on the Downs, the great detective nears terminal melancholia - only to be saved by an encounter with headstrong, yellow-haired young Marry Russell who soon becomes the Master's apprentice not only in beekeeping but in detection.… (more)

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