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Cinderella by Ruth Sanderson
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Cinderella

by Ruth Sanderson

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A retelling of the classic fairy tale we all know, with little details that vary from the original. After the death of her mother, Cinderella is forced to spend her days with her cruel stepmother and stepsisters. Cinderella is treated as a servant by them and is told that can't go to the ball. With the help of her fairy god mother, Cinderella goes to the ball and dances with the prince. She loses her glass slipper at the ball and the prince goes out to find the true owner of the slipper, who at the end of the story, becomes his princess. The two live happily ever after. ( )
  Eayyad | Mar 15, 2017 |
This book Cinderella is similar to the original fairytale "Cinderella" we all know and love. But, they do have some big differences. For example, in this book Cinderella's father is alive and a main character in the book. The plot of the story is that Cinderella's mother passed away and now he married a mean widow with two mean daughters. Just like in the original, Cinderella does all the cleaning and serves the family. It is told in the story that the step mother has control over Cinderella's father. As we know, the king's son is having a ball and invited every young beautiful lady to attend. Cinderella wants to attend of course but the step mother refuses to let her go. A fairy godmother appears and helps Cinderella look beautiful and uses pumpkins and mice to make a carriage for her to get to the ball. Another big difference is, Cinderella's beautiful dress in gold in this book and as we know in the original, her dress was blue. I know whenever I think of Cinderella, I think of her in the beautiful blue sparkly dress with her golden hair in a neat bun. Cinderella arrives at the ball and attracts to prince immediately and the rest is history. Another big difference between the original and this story is when the prince arrives to see who the glass slipper belongs to, Cinderella was sitting in the garden, not locked upstairs by the step mother. The prince notices and asks, "Who is that in the garden?" and her father says, "That's my daughter. Isn't she beautiful?" That was so cute. Cinderella and the prince lived happily ever after, of course. You can tell this is a fairytale from all the magical attributes and the unrealistic plot. The style in this book is similar to the original and so is the theme. I believe there is a few themes to Cinderella. For example: Good will always conquers evil. Good things happen to good people. Anything can happen if you just believe. Love will find its way. I think this book is just as good as the original, but for me, nothing will beat the original. I know children would love this book and enjoy it just as I did. ( )
  cmsmit12 | Mar 9, 2017 |
I found myself comparing this book with the Disney version of the fairy tale of Cinderella. I felt like this was your typical Cinderella story with a few things different from the version I am used to. As a recap, Cinderella is a girl whose father remarries and is forced to live with an evil stepmother and her two daughters. The stepmother and her daughters are very mean to Cinderella and make her do all the house chores. One day the kingdom hosts a ball and invites all the young ladies. Cinderella's step mother does not allow her to go and leaves Cinderella alone in the house. After they all leave Cinderella gets a gift from a fairy godmother and the rest is history! This book told the basic Cinderella story but some things were different. For instance, in this story Cinderella's father is alive and sees the mistreatment his wife and stepdaughters give Cinderella, but he remains quiet. Another important difference from the Disney version of Cinderella is that she was not friends with the mice. The mice were actually not given any fairy-tale like characteristics until the fairy godmother turned them into something. I thought that was very interesting because the mice play a big role in the story of Cinderella. I really enjoyed this book nonetheless. You can tell this is a fantasy book because of the magical and mystical attributes. The fairy-tale like characteristics were very entertaining. I thought the illustrations were very detailed and somewhat realistic. I think children would enjoy this book, and if they know another version of the Cinderella story, then I think they would definitely be like me pointing out every difference. ( )
  NihadKased | Sep 19, 2016 |
Ruth Sanderson wrote the classic story of Cinderella. A major difference that I noticed in this version is that Cinderella’s father was alive throughout the entire story. Even though his new wife and step-daughters treat Cinderella terribly, he does not stick up for her until the end of the story when prince charming is trying to find out whose foot fits the class slipper. Also, in this version readers find out how Cinderella receives her name. This book is a classic and includes very detailed illustrations that readers will find enjoyable. ( )
  cedoyle | Feb 20, 2016 |
Cinderella by Ruth Anderson is a lively tale and is very similar to the classic Disney movie I've seen. The one difference I did notice is that in the book Cinderella's father is alive throughout the entire story and is still made the servant in the house by her jealous stepmother. This is different from the movie where Cinderella's father dies in the beginning of the story, leaving her stepmother in charge. Stepmother did not make Cinderella the servant until after her father dies. Since Cinderella's father was alive in the book, and she was still treated as a servant, it made me sad that her father would allow that. One theme in this book is to treat everybody equal and with the same respect you would want to be treated with. Cinderella's family treated her like a servant, until one day the prince chose Cinderella to be his wife. Cinderella became a princess and her family, who treated her poorly, were trapped in their house by angry birds for the rest of their lives. ( )
  olivia.sanchez | Feb 18, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316779652, Hardcover)

Dreams come true with a little hope and a wave of a fairy godmother's wand. But will the prince find Cinderella after her ball gown turns back into rags? This classic tale is retold by Ruth Sanderson with the very youngest of readers in mind.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:43 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Although she is mistreated by her stepmother and stepsisters, a kind-hearted young woman manages to attend the palace ball with the help of her fairy godmother.

» see all 2 descriptions

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